Work in progress 20"x30" Oil on Canvas

Been working on this one for a bit. The dog is done (For now) and i'm working on the back and foreground. Let me know what you think sofar. Any suggestions or criticism is welcome.
GTOArtGalBuckytassieguyAllieA_Time_To_PaintGary_HeathCabralanwesha

Comments

  • Good work.  The dog looks good and I like the long curves of the grasses. 
    The background may need some atmospheric effect so that it does not distract from the dog.
    ArtGal
  • I like the dog and the foreground a lot and I agree with @GTO that the background is a little distracting. My eyes keep going up to those mountains. 
  • @Bucky @GTO Ya, for some reason the mountains look brighter in photo, I'm not happy with them yet and still have more work to do. I think I need more variation in the colors of the grass in front of the dog.
  • The dog and the grass are shaping up very nicely, @MJC. With the background mountains, I think you just need to make them a bit lighter in value and bluer to impart atmospheric perspective and create more depth.
  • I agree.   As it is, it has a bit of a poster feel to it rather than a painting.    If the poster look is what you were aiming for, then you should be more than happy with it.    If you want more of a painting feel, then perhaps some of the above suggestions would help to take the viewer's eye from focussing too much on the mountains.
    Well done with the foreground.
  • I love the dog and foreground.  Very well done.  The mountains have very repetitive shapes .  even if they are that way, I would take my artistic license and vary them as well as lightening them and painting them with a bluish to lavender color.  The painting is really nice as is,  but a little value change could take it up several notches.
  • Looks great to me!:) Would maybe try to define some bigger shapes in the grass or add some colour variation to the ground, but I haven't seen the reference. Love the dog! The shadow under his ribs does so much good  work for me idk:P :D
  • Yes, better. The mountains don't compete so much for attention now and seem to be an integral part of the picture.
    MJC
  • That works better.  Much more restful to the eye.  Like the daisy flowers and the seed heads.
    MJC
  • I think that's a huge improvement. Great job! 
    MJC
  • Thanks all for your advice, sent the pic to the client and they are ecstatic. I will post a final phot after i get it varnished. Again thanks for all the help!

  • edited September 3
    Wow. I love the sense of personality in the dog - capturing that nobility. No wonder the owner is happy. You have a wonderful eye for detail, and I love the play of textures in the grass.
    Air affects the light in two ways. The contrast of values becomes weaker - so the darks become lighter and lights less so. We think they're white, but they're not. And secondly the colours become less saturated. The atmosphere particularly sucks the yellow and orange out of the light - so it's a blue to violet haze. I did two things - pulled back the saturation of the grasses behind - air makes a difference even in a short distance sometimes - and then a bluish haze over the hills to push them back because they were still very warm. I don't know - just playing as I can't see your source.
    It's a beautiful painting.


    MJC
  • edited September 3
    @Abstraction, where I live the hills (very, very similar to these in distance, height and colour) are reasonably close.  they appear just like this.  The mountain range behind the one you see (where I live) then develops the atmospheric haze if you climb the nearby ones and look out into the grand distance.

    So, from my experience, it was just right without your attempt to make the mountains appear more distant.

    I wonder which is the case with the actual position the painting is done from?

    Ed to add. the more I think about it, the more I think your addition of atmosphere distracts from the painting as it does not somehow suit the style of the artist.  MJC has a wonderfully unique style, which has an almost poster feel to it with its clarity.    It is not a reconstruction of a traditional landscape painting, it is how MJC interprets it.  Personally, I think the way it was done and handed to the client is spot on.
    Just my limited knowledge opinion of course, but I do think MJC has a very unique style and I would be saddened to see that become more mainstream traditional landscapey work.

    Then again, perhaps my ideas have very little value, and that is why I am not some famous artist, pulling in clients and acclaim and $ !!!
    Abstraction
  • Thanks for that perspective - good discussion, and my rough edits were only intended for discussion too. I have just completed a seascape in the pilbara - up north in Australia - where the cliffs in the distance were also much warmer and darks stronger than I expected. When you don't see the source image you're just guessing.
  • Thanks for that perspective - good discussion, and my rough edits were only intended for discussion too. I have just completed a seascape in the pilbara - up north in Australia - where the cliffs in the distance were also much warmer and darks stronger than I expected. When you don't see the source image you're just guessing.
    Would love to see it if you have the inclination to share it at some stage.
    Yes, it is tricky without the source, but then again, with all paintings, at some stage, the source materials have to be disregarded, and the painting be allowed to take on a life of its own.  Where did I read a wonderful quote about that recently.....????  I remember, it was in the comments of an Ian Roberts video.   

    Tremolux Man wrote
    "... If all we are interested in is documenting 'things', then we should just be photographers cataloging the world around us. Painters are interpreters of the visual world, not archivists."

    I thought that was a wonderful way of looking at the different disciplines.
    Abstraction
  • And I don't want to obscure the delight in MJC's interpretation of the visual world: that suspended moment of the dog in its element in nature, in the up close texture of the grasses. Beautifully observed.

  • This is the source photo for this painting. I didn't follow it very close for the background.
  • @MJC
    Nice Brittany. I'm an English Setter guy. Good dog painting. Try not to distract the viewer from the the dog.
    Your photo works better than the painting which emphasizes everything to the same degree. 

    A classic bird dog painting. The focus on the dogs.
    Percival Leonard Rosseau (1859-1937) Perfection: Ned and Bob

    AbstractionMJC
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