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Florent Farges Demonstrates the Blight of Blending

Folks

In the quest for style we often advocate a non blending application of paint.
Rarely discussed is the aesthetic cost of dry brush blending. Dull, plasticised forms, lacking spontaneity and visual interest. Farges here demonstrates Harold Speed’s nostrums of using intermediate values and generous dollops of pigment to give dimension and life to a form.



Denis

KaustavMichaelDEphram

Comments

  • @dencal Thanks for posting this, I found it very helpful.

    As was this posted among the comments by the artist 

    ".. it's also very important to put the right value at the right place. So, in my opinion, blending with a dry brush should be avoided as much as possible for beginners that want to learn."
    dencal
  • MichaelD said:

    ".. it's also very important to put the right value at the right place. So, in my opinion, blending with a dry brush should be avoided as much as possible for beginners that want to learn."
    Paul Foxton says that blending is a subtractive process. Going in with a dry brush, it lifts paint off the canvas, so make sure there is plenty there before blending.
    MichaelD
  • Right over my head, @dencal --- an astonishing amount of stuff that is posted is over my head - but when that happens I just shut up. Probably a good thing,too...
  • edited December 2018
    Good advice but every book I've ever read on painting insists that it's wrong to hold a brush like a pencil.  It's not an easy habit to break but holding it further back leads to better brushwork. I suppose it depends on what look a painter is after. Many painters today who strive for a photo realistic look in their work tend to hold their brushes like pencils. I usually try to avoid it.  Below: Sorolla, Bouguereau, and Sargent.                                                                  . 
    Boudicca
  • I’m glad someone shared this video. One of my favorites of all time (behind Marks videos). 

    Blending was the most fustrating and confusing thing to me when I started painting. It was this video and then later Mark Carder’s that helped me to realize that you don’t really do much blending at all...its all about putting the right values in the right place and leaving most brush strokes completely alone. 
    PaulBtassieguyDianna
  • @Leo2015 said Good advice but every book I've ever read on painting insists that it's wrong to hold a brush like a pencil.  It's not an easy habit to break but holding it further back leads to better brushwork. I suppose it depends on what look a painter is after. Many painters today who strive for a photo realistic look in their work tend to hold their brushes like pencils. I usually try to avoid it.      

    I agree, as I have got more practised at holding brushes I find I am moving further down the handle and it makes for a looser and more deft stroke. It’s actually easier to control the brush I find, or maybe I’m starting to get muscle memory.                                                                          
    Leo2015Dianna
  • Also helps avoid getting paint from the canvas all over the heal of your hand and smudging what you've already painted. :)
    Leo2015Dianna
  • @Boudicca, I sort of agree with you. Books can be misleading sometimes. If you want to see some nice brush holding technique, find Kaustav's video of him painting. I think it was before he started pleinair . He points his hand at the canvas and lets the brush dance in his hand. I'll come back and post a link if I can find it.
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