Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

You can send an email to [email protected] if you have questions about how to use this forum.

Help! Complete stuff up

edited December 2018 in General Discussion
So, it’s getting late, I have 5 canvasses to stain, I might as well do it now and then I can put the second coat on tomorrow night.

Grab a brush, squeeze the stain out into a small bowl, start painting. Gee, it seems really thick and dark. Maybe because it’s the last bit in the tube it’s thickened up or something. Keep going, have to put some Gamsol in with it as it’s not spreading too easily, the colour looks strange, really strange.........as I start to cover the last canvas ( with a million thoughts running through my head as to why the stain is so weird) I look at the tube, it says Burnt Umber   :scream:   @#$&$ “.$&#  @#&$% .....so I finish staining the last canvas.
So I am wondering if I have just wasted a $100 worth of canvases by covering them with burnt umber mixed with Gamsol, or can I just go over the top tomorrow night with the actual proper stain and all will be well?

I’ve  also used up all my Burnt umber  :anguished: Waiting on an order from Geneva

you can laugh at me if you want, I’m laughing at myself

Comments

  • i think its important to remember the fat over lean rule... if the BU mixed gamsol is thinner (less oil) than the stain, i dont think it will be a problem if you add a layer of the stain later. I've used a couple of times a very thin stain made of very much diluted BU, just as a tint to the white canvas.
    Boudicca
  • edited December 2018
    It will be perfect!  That is what the paintings wanted..  When I am playing around with my tonalism - the base is always burnt umber - it gives a warm glow base.  Lately, I have started toning with terra rosa. Sometimes I stain with a mid-tone grey - one of my latest paintings was a phthalo!  I was experimenting with how far I could push it with the canvas stain - some artists just are trying to "kill the white" with just about anything.  If it seems to dark, just scrub more and it should be a lovely mid-tone warm color - I would never apply anything other than pure oil paint over what you have.  It will be fine!!! Believe it or not, that phthalo ended up giving a certain vibrancy to the painting.  

    I think your "mistake" was serendipitous .
    Boudicca
  • Boudicca

    Chill. Not critical. All you need is some neutral hue to kill the white. For me gray, brown, rust red or black works well.

    Denis

    JuliannaBoudiccaanwesha
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2018
    But it was funny how it happened.  I laughed out loud because I'm always grabbing the burnt umber instead of the foundational stain--but catching it in the nick of time!  Now I know what to do if it should actually happen.  Am I the only one who wishes the foundational stain were lighter in value/color?  Or, that Geneva would offer a more mid-value version?  That would help.  :)
  • Shonna, it'll be fine. You're a pro and you can overcome anything with oil painting I'm sure. @Summer add a little white to the stain.... no rules.
    Summer
  • At least it wasn't Cadmium Red, that would have been expensive..
    Boudicca
  • BOB73 said:
    @Summer add a little white to the stain.... no rules.
    Good idea Bob.  Will it compromise the product you think?  I dunno but I am going to experiment with that for sure. 
  • The Geneva stain is oil paint not the fast-dry alkyd so it won't mess with the mixture.
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2018
    BOB73 said:
    The Geneva stain is oil paint not the fast-dry alkyd so it won't mess with the mixture.
    How did you find that out?  I assumed it was an alkyd because I know Mark dislikes beginning a painting on a wet oil wash.  But then the foundation stain is dry by the time we actually paint on it because those umbers dry very fast. 

    Summer
  • If you're going to add white to your stain, I recommend w&n fast drying white? It's really fast drying! Makes for a good ground for oil painting.
    Summer
  • If you're going to add white to your stain, I recommend w&n fast drying white? It's really fast drying! Makes for a good ground for oil painting.
    I will do that.  Thanks.
    Forgiveness
  • @Summer    I know exactly what you mean -- I have banished my foundation stain to another spot altogether because I'm always getting mixed up between the tube of BU and the tube of foundation stain.... it used to drive me nuts.
  • I’ve been saving the extra pallet paint in an air tight container. My thought is to use it as a base for canvas stain. What can I add to the mixture to get it to dry sooner?
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2018
    I’ve been saving the extra pallet paint in an air tight container. My thought is to use it as a base for canvas stain. What can I add to the mixture to get it to dry sooner?
    That is a good question.  It is a question I had to come to grips with myself.  I decided not to add anything. Because I use oil primers and paints, I have panels drying for six months in a storage area.  Then I use linseed oil sparingly over the areas I will be painting on when I take a panel out of storage just in case six months wasn't enough drying time. 

    If you choose to use additives to shorten the drying time, you have to pay close attention to what compounds you are using and when.  Oils can be applied over acrylics, for instance, but acrylics cannot be applied over oils. 

    I like to keep things simple and deal with the long dry time factor.  If you shorten the drying time by using alkyds, alcohol and acid,  while you are painting, you won't have to worry about leftovers.  There won't be any.  The same goes for using Liquin added to oils while painting.
     
    By not adding any extra clove oil, that in itself will shorten the drying time, but not by much.  Hope this helps.

    This is my understanding from my experience and I welcome any comments.  Especially advice to the contrary.   :)  

    Summer 
    PaulB
  • @Kodiakwood  I thought I would add a little something about the option we have to paint on a wet stain or a dry one.  I believe a dry stain is safer because at the end of the painting the most that can show through is this dry stain which hopefully is a mid tone or a compatible one, anyway.  If a wet stain is applied first, say with an umber or a sienna or even a drawing is produced with a brush using these same colors, and it is not allowed to dry first, what could happen, as subsequent paint layers are applied, the bristles of the brush could bite into the wet stain layer and expose whatever white primer was used.  That is always a mess to remedy.  It doesn't always happen depending upon the brush you are using and the pressure you are applying to the brush.  But why take a chance if it could happen.  That is why I always paint on a dry stain.  Hope this helps as well  :)

    Summer
    PaulB
Sign In or Register to comment.