Carrie

Our good friends, James W. Hall and Evelyn Hall lost their sweet dog, Carrie, recently. I did this 11" x 14" oil on linen painting of her for them.

Not sure if I'm finished with the fur on ear or not. I need a few days of not looking at it. Right now it's all a blur.

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studioaniaopnwydertjsdencal[Deleted User]AmritGaryAZPaintervalentinRonnasue_deutscherelenaHarrelledwardKarencynthiagwilsonmycjcdrNiharikagLizONeal

Comments

  • edited April 2013
    I love it Garry!
    I would refine the fur on the ear. because of balance. Carrie's face is detailed ... the same should be on the ear!
    The painting is stunning!
    Maria
    garrykravitedwardmariebjudith
  • I agree with Maria. The level of realism in the dog's nose, mouth and eyes is just stellar so the ears are catching me funny. That snout is amazing.....
    garrykravit
  • ^:)^ :-c ^:)^ You already know I love this!
    garrykravit
  • Thanks guys, I'll go ahead and do the detail on the ears. That's what my gut is saying and your thoughts drive it in that direction.
  • This is amazing Garry!
    garrykravit
  • Super Garry! I have a bit of a different feeling about more detail in the ear. I think it looks good as is but, more importantly to me, I think the lack of fine detail helps keep focus on the face itself, particularly the eyes. Congratulations! :-bd
    garrykravitJodieU
  • Aw, this is sweet :-) I love it. What a beautiful gift.
    garrykravit
  • I agree with Gary. You might want to refine the ear a bit, perhaps soften some edges, etc., but the lack of detail directs the viewer to the face. IMHO, if you go with the same level of detail on the ears, it will look like a photograph rather than a painting.
    garrykravit
  • Thanks guys, for all of your incredibly kind compliments. I appreciate that. I think Martin nails it, remove some of the obvious (what I will call) flaws in the larger, defined brush strokes on the ear because these call attention to themselves, maybe by softening the edges, maybe adding slight value differentiation within some of those strokes, but don't bring in the same level of realism into the ear or you end up with a photo.

    G
    Martin_J_CraneHarrell
  • I think that you nailed it - great job!
    garrykravitGary
  • That looks so good, you should take him to the Vet for some shots to be on the safe side. :))
    garrykravitGary
  • What a nice gift for your friends...I'm sure they will really appreciate it...I just want to reach in and pet this cute little thing!
    garrykravit
  • edited April 2013
    By the way, the eyes are in-cre-di-ble. You've probably answered this question before, but when you're working from a reference photo, are you following Mark's portrait instructions and working from a laminated photo, or are you using an image on a computer screen and a color checker?
  • mnsrc said:

    By the way, the eyes are in-cre-di-ble. You've probably answered this question before, but when you're working from a reference photo, are you following Mark's portrait instructions and working from a laminated photo, or are you using an image on a computer screen and a color checker?

    Thanks Martin, I am working from photographs printed out and then laminated. I often put the images on a monitor as well so I can "blow them up" for detail. In this case it wasn't really necessary as the photos gave me the level of detail I wanted and the painting is relatively small.

    The first photos I had done were printed by Costco and I was very unhappy with them in terms of color. I had not decided to purchase the new Epson printer at that point. When I did get the printer and printed this photo I saw significant difference. Costco essentially blew out some of the lighter colors/hues to get more detail. My printer, without adjustment to the image (I was provided with a .jpeg image which I didn't take) came out much darker but closer to Carrie's correct colors, maybe a little too red. So what I did was paint off of both images, using my printer's image for truer color, and Costco's image for detail in the nose and eyeballs. This is probably what I will do in the future if I paint from photos, and it's what lots of people recommend when painting from photos, use a darker one and a lighter one. I am pleased with the results.

    This is a bad photo because it was taken with an iPhone and it's too bright in my studio ... but you get the idea.

    Costco photo on left, my printer's photo on right:
    image

    This is the Costco photo I used for eye detail:

    image

    This is my printer's photo used for color:

    image
  • Thanks for the explanation, Garry. I can definitely see what you mean.
  • Incredibly stunning and such a thoughtful gift for your friends. Donna
    garrykravit
  • Oh my gosh, that's so good.
    garrykravit
  • I think you've managed to capture this little guy's personality...probably the most important aspect of the painting. Just beautiful!
    garrykravit
  • It is so successful that I ask myself just a question... Nim does not do a crisis of jealousy? :P
    garrykravit
  • Oh Garry, how beautiful. ^:)^ ^:)^ The first thing that catches my eye is the eye and then the nose. Super great job. One other thing I notice and maybe its just me but the white section on the head at the top where it meets dark hair looks like it is higher than the dark at first glance but I know it is in shadow and isn't but at first it looked like it. And under the nose, the left has some reddish hair but not on right, i compared the picture and the painting side by side and it appears the picture has a little reddish tint on the right side like slight fur, Maybe not. But I just love this and I know your friennds will cherish it. That eye is just so so real and the nose looks just like she's ready to rub that cold nose against you.
    garrykravitrgr
  • SusieQ said:

    Oh Garry, how beautiful. ^:)^ ^:)^ The first thing that catches my eye is the eye and then the nose. Super great job. One other thing I notice and maybe its just me but the white section on the head at the top where it meets dark hair looks like it is higher than the dark at first glance but I know it is in shadow and isn't but at first it looked like it. And under the nose, the left has some reddish hair but not on right, i compared the picture and the painting side by side and it appears the picture has a little reddish tint on the right side like slight fur, Maybe not. But I just love this and I know your friennds will cherish it. That eye is just so so real and the nose looks just like she's ready to rub that cold nose against you.

    Thanks Susie!
    The photos and even the painting are not really accurate in terms of what is seen in person. The camera is doing weird things and I'd say that it's even over defining some things that look much more blended and soft in person. The eye does a good job of hiding flaws. :) I appreciate your look at it with a critical view toward helping to get it perfect.

    G
  • Gary, I supected that but can't see what you see, Would love to see the real thing, the painting I mean because i know it would be better than the photos.
    garrykravit
  • Great Gary, the eyes are very good! I`m sure they will love it.
    garrykravit
  • Garry,
    I know I would sincerely appreciate receiving this painting if the Carrie had been ours. Well done!
    garrykravit
  • Gary, this is really terrific. Can I ask how to laminate the photos? Thanks so much!
  • Hi G,
    Truly stunning painting, and a lovely gift for a friend. Love how you dive into painting. No matter what the outcome, you just make it work! Very inspiring. Awesome!!! =D> =D> =D>
    garrykravit
  • rgr said:

    Gary, this is really terrific. Can I ask how to laminate the photos? Thanks so much!

    Thanks rgr,

    You can laminate by simply using a roller and cold laminating material on a photograph, but I was never happy with the results I got. I always seemed to have milky, washed out looking photos.

    I bought one of these - which by the way has worked great, there is only review on Amazon and that guys seems to have had a bad experience - the GBC Swingline 3000L.

    http://www.amazon.com/Swingline-12-Inch-Laminator-Warm-Up-1703075/dp/B009FFYIKY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1365975616&sr=8-1&keywords=GBC+Swingline+laminator+3000l

    And I use the crystal clear laminating material. They make it in 1mil, 3mil, and 5mil, I think. I accidentally bought a package of 1mil, which while works great has a tendency to crinkle on the photo if you're not careful. It doesn't really affect anything but I don't like the distraction. From now on I'll probably only buy the 3mil.

    Good luck!

    G
  • Thanks Gary! I added it to my amazon wish list, but it's a bit pricey so it may be there a while :) I'm a ways off from needing one though so I'll start saving now. By the time I'm feeling I'm up to a portrait maybe I'll have it! My wife wants me to paint our dogs. I assume she means she wants me to paint their likeness, but you never know. ;)
    Garymarieb
  • rgr said:

    My wife wants me to paint our dogs. I assume she means she wants me to paint their likeness, but you never know. ;)

    Funny you should mention that! There was this guy Quentin Gregory, an artist, who had a series of DVDs. He had one called, "You can paint ducks!" A friend of mine and I were talking about this one day, for whatever reason, and a few days later he sent me a painting that the DVD inspired. He's a writer with a rather twisted sense of humor.

    image
    rgrcynthiagwilsonGary
  • Gary,
    You are too much. Spliting my side. :)) :))
    garrykravit
  • This is outstanding Gary! Incredible realism. One question: Do you let the paint dry before you paint the highlights and details or do you paint into the layer beneath when it's still wet?
  • ebs,

    Thank you.

    I pretty much paint wet into wet, or wet on top of wet. Sometimes the paint dries and I add a highlight over the top, sometimes it's not completely dry but tacky. It just sort of depends upon where I'm at but I almost never intentionally wait for it to try to paint a highlight.

    G
  • ebs,

    Thank you.

    I pretty much paint wet into wet, or wet on top of wet. Sometimes the paint dries and I add a highlight over the top, sometimes it's not completely dry but tacky. It just sort of depends upon where I'm at but I almost never intentionally wait for it to try to paint a highlight.

    G

    Just as long as you don't blend :))
  • Garry thank you for answering. Sorry to ask you so many questions but, I noticed in a thread you said that you often painted just using linseed oil and no solvents. I want to avoid solvents aswell and was wondering what paint brand you used and if you mix the linseed oil into the paint in jars to get the "ketchup consistency" Mark talks about? Or do you just use the paint straight out of the tube, and then add linseed oil to it? Thanks again.
  • Great job Garry! Your handling of the various textures-fur, eyes, nose - all awesome.
  • JCDR, thank you. I appreciate that.
    ebs said:

    Garry thank you for answering. Sorry to ask you so many questions but, I noticed in a thread you said that you often painted just using linseed oil and no solvents. I want to avoid solvents aswell and was wondering what paint brand you used and if you mix the linseed oil into the paint in jars to get the "ketchup consistency" Mark talks about? Or do you just use the paint straight out of the tube, and then add linseed oil to it? Thanks again.

    ebs, Well, the answer depends upon what method/style I'm using. When I paint with Mark's methods, which I did on this painting, I use Slow Dry Medium (SDM) as discussed by Mark. I like painting in that style and I seem to have pretty good results. But again, I'd like to to completely get away from solvents.

    When I paint not using Draw Mix Paint (DMP) I sometimes use a sort of traditional mixture of 1/3 linseed oil and 2/3 Odorless Mineral Spirits (or maybe I have proportions backwards). Sometimes I just use linseed or walnut oil. Sometimes I use Galkyd, or Neo Megilp (both Gamblin products). But with any of these I never pre mix them with the paint. The only time I premix is with the SDM as Mark calls for. When I paint with these other mediums I put them in a little stainless bowl and dip my brush in as necessary. You have to be careful if you use straight oil, linseed or otherwise, as if you use too much the paint will curdle or crack very easily when drying or dry.

    I use all different brands of paint at the moment. I have not tried any of the very expensive brands though I'm sure I'd love them if I did. I have tubes by many different manufacturers, mostly W&N Artist, Rembrandt, Utrecht, Grumbacher PreTest, and Gamblin. I'd say that my favorite overall at this moment (until I try the new Geneva paints that Mark and Liz are producing) are W&N and Gamblin. Rembrandts are good too. They all work though. Some just have consistencies and textures different than others. I like a really buttery smooth paint.

    I am told that the absolute best way to paint, in terms of what's best for the paint layers to adhere, is with no medium at all. Of course we rarely do that for a variety of reasons. Sometimes we want to thin our darks, and sometimes we want to keep the paint open (wet) for a long time, like with SDM.

    I have been experimenting with a lot of different styles and methods. They all seem to work and I'm finding that they're not as critical as just painting.

    Today I am starting a new painting that I will be doing while following along with Morgan Weistling's DVD. He paints a 27" x 34" painting of a girl doing her homework. His method is to use only paint with paints straight out of the tube, mixing and applying little tiles of color as he goes. He uses only walnut oil to clean his brush and tries to keep all solvents out of his studio. He will sometimes, though rarely, use Liquin, when he needs to thin the layer like with darks. Generally he uses no mediums. I personally love the results of his style and believe that this is kind of where I'm heading with my painting. It's very much like Mark's method but he just doesn't premix and he doesn't use a slow dry medium.

    Best,
    G
    Cin_D
  • Thank you so much Gary for your thorough answer! Really appreciate it.
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