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Is this mineral spirit??

I have no idea what mineral spirit is :/ is this it?

Comments

  • Mavis

    I think you might find white spirit can leave a powdery deposit on the dried paint surface.

    White spirit (according to wikipedia) is a cheap distillate of petroleum that can be used as a substitute for the turpentine made from trees.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit
    White Spirit is a petroleum distillate that is used as a paint thinner and mild solvent. In industry, mineral spirits are used for cleaning and degreasing machine tools and parts. According to Wesco, a supplier of solvents and cleaning equipment, mineral spirits "are especially effective in removing oils, greases, carbon, and other material from metal."[citation needed] Mineral spirits may also be used in conjunction with cutting oil as a thread cutting and reaming lubricant.

    Mineral spirits are an inexpensive petroleum-based replacement for the vegetable-based turpentine. It is commonly used as a paint thinner for oil-based paint and cleaning brushes, and as an organic solvent in other applications. Mineral turpentine is chemically very different from turpentine, which mainly consists of pinene, and it has inferior solvent properties.[8] Artists use mineral spirits as an alternative to turpentine since it is less flammable and less toxic. Because of interactions with pigments, artists require a higher grade of mineral spirits than many industrial users, including the complete absence of residual sulfur.

    Mineral spirits have a characteristic unpleasant kerosene-like odor. Chemical manufacturers have developed a low odor version of mineral turpentine which contains less of the highly volatile shorter hydrocarbons.[9] Odorless mineral spirits are mineral spirits that have been further refined to remove the more toxic aromatic compounds, and are recommended for applications such as oil painting, where humans have close contact with the solvent.

    In screen printing (also referred to as silk-screening), mineral spirits are often used to clean and unclog screens after printing with oil-based textile and plastisol inks. They are also used to thin inks used in making monoprints.

    Mineral spirits are often used inside liquid-filled compasses and gauges.

    Mineral spirits are also used for re-gripping golf clubs. After the old grip is removed, the mineral spirits are poured into the new grip and shaken. After, the mineral spirits are poured on the new underlying tape and the new grip is slid on. After an hour of drying out, the new grip and club are ready to use.

    Although not normally marketed as a fuel, white spirit can be used as an alternative to kerosene in portable stoves, since it is merely a light grade of kerosene. It cannot be used as an alternative to white gas, which is a much more volatile gasoline-like fuel.

    White spirits are also a major ingredient in some popular automotive fuel/oil additives, such as Marvel Mystery Oil, as they are capable of dissolving varnish and sludge buildup.[10]

    Mineral spirits are also commonly used for cutting fluid in ultraprecision lathes (commonly referred to as diamond turning machines).
    Denis

    mavis_swt
  • White spirit is Cheap?? Lol that thing there cost SGD19.90 lol.. I didn't buy it.. Waiting for you to save me Denis :D always providing helpful information.. Thank you!!! :x
  • Mine is GAMSOL 100% odourless Mineral Spirit made by GAMBLIN.
    There are several sizes available on Amazon at the moment and the description explains why it is preferred by artists.
    Gary
  • edwardedward -
    edited March 2013
    Sometimes Mineral Spirits is sold as "Paint Thinner" in hardware stores. But it will say that it is mineral spirits somewhere on the front of the can. At least that's the way it is where I live. (Just make sure it says 100% mineral spirits. Some say only "Made with Mineral Spirits" which may contain something unwanted for all I know).
  • Unless it says Artist's Grade on the mineral spirits it will all have residue in it that makes it unfit for using with oil paints, especially in the Mark Carder Method. You might clean brushes, but why buy two containers of it? It's about like the difference between diesel and high octane gasolines. Not interchangeable in engines.
  • Read this Mavis http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit
    I always use a high quality odorless mineral spirit like Gamsol. I rarely throw any away. As I use it and get paint solids in the container I will pour it in another larger container and let it settle. After a few days you can pour off the clear odorless thinner and reuse it. One can lasts a long time for me. :)
    mavis_swt
  • KarenKaren -
    edited March 2013
    Referencing @gfish 's link:

    "Artists use mineral spirits as an alternative to turpentine since it is less flammable and less toxic. Because of interactions with pigments, artists require a higher grade of mineral spirits than many industrial users, including the complete absence of residual sulfur.

    Mineral spirits have a characteristic unpleasant kerosene-like odor. Chemical manufacturers have developed a low odor version of mineral turpentine which contains less of the highly volatile shorter hydrocarbons. Odorless mineral spirits are mineral spirits that have been further refined to remove the more toxic aromatic compounds, and are recommended for applications such as oil painting, where humans have close contact with the solvent."

    The only reason to buy something from an art supply store that you can buy, literally, anywhere else, is to put more money in the pockets of the art store and the art supply house that slaps their own brand label on it.

    I will just about 100% guarantee that the art store artist grade thinner comes from exactly the same tap as the stuff in the hardware store. Don't buy into the hype.

    Do your own research and draw your own conclusions.

    From Wet Canvas:
    I'm not a chemist and haven't even compared the ingredient statements on any of these products so what I say has no scientific basis. I am familiar with marketing though, and would guess that there are relatively few manufacturers of mineral spirits. Many manufacturers make "private label" product. Basically the same stuff with different labels. Once a company has gone to the expense of researching and developing odorless mineral spirits they will use many avenues to sell it. One way is under their own name. Another is "private label". That's not to say that Weber and Gamblin don't have some kind of proprietary formula, but it seems unlikely that all the brands of odorless mineral spirits out there each have different formulas. In fact there is a little shelf sign at my local Daniel Smith store that says that their OMS has the same formulation as Gamsol. My guess is that OMS is OMS. The fact that your OMS is cheaper doesn't mean it's inferior, or even different.
  • KarenKaren -
    edited March 2013
    Other references:

    http://garybolyer.com/2011/07/28/top-6-solvents-for-the-serious-oil-painter/

    http://peabody-here.blogspot.com/2012/03/solvent-riddle-thinners-turps.html

    http://matthewkinsey.com/odorless-mineral-spirits-oms-facts-for-artists/2010/01/10

    So unless you call Gamblin or Daniel Smith and actually pin them down on how, exactly, theirs is different, I'm inclined to think Odorless Mineral Spirits is fine.
  • Mavis,

    White spirit is easily located in a DIY store, there is version odor-free (or almost) and cost cheap... in a store for painter artists, it is too expensive then that is exactly the same
  • FYI - quoting from Paints & Colors- What Every Artist Needs to Know About by David Pyle page 136 "Always read the product labels. The labeling standard for Chronic Health Hazards in Art Materials (ASTM D-4236) has been codified into US law as part of the Federal Hazardous Substances Act 15 USC S 1277. In cooperation with the Art & Creative Materials Institute (ACMI), all art and creative products marketed in the USA include labeling that details if and how precautions should be taken. ..In addition, the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has prepared standards for the safe use of artists' materials. These have been published as a booklet entitled :ASTM Standards for the Performance, Quality and Health labeling of Artists' Paints and Related Materials,: ISBAN 0-8031-1838-4. The address foro ASTM is ASTM, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959.
    ...Whenever and whenever possible use a low aromatic solvent, such as Sansodor from Winsor & Newton, or Gamsol from Gamblin Artist Colors. Both have equal Threshold Limit Values (TLV, at 300 ppm) and, of the two, Sansodor has a slightly higher and safer flash point."

    I did not know this info when I bought my artist grade mineral spirits which tells me that it conforms to ASTM D-4236 but tells me nothing else, so I will order the Sanodor to get the safer flash point and to have a lower ppm of contaminents.
  • Lots of chemistry here but from my experience of 30 years around chemicals is, if the odor threshold allows you to smell it the parts per million are higher than the same chemical with no odor. I do not know if this applies to mineral spirits but it applies to my comfort zone.
  • One other point I noted in a description of Gamsol was that ordinary white spirit/mineral spirit etc sold as paint thinner or brush cleaner are formulated on the harsh side purely for thier cleaning properties whereas gamsol is on the gentler side which makes it suitable for artists.
  • The following are Threshold Limit Values (TLV) for an 8 hour work day (according to ACGIH: American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists).

    Higher values are less toxic.

    Turpentine 100ppm (including W&N distilled)
    Aliphatic Hydrocarbons 100ppm (Turpenoid, Utrecht Odorless)
    Iso-paraffinic Hydrocarbons 171ppm (Maimeri Odorless)
    Common hardware store OMS 100-200ppm
    Hydro-treated Heavy Naptha 300ppm (includes Gamsol)
    Thanks to Michael Skalka of the ASTM for the basic outline presented here. Michael Skalka is the Chair of ASTM D01.57 and the Conservation Administrator at the National Gallery of Art. He also is an artist.

    Proper ventilation, gloves (for recipe mixing), respirator, etc, should always be used. And if used properly, should not be problematic for the average individual's health.

    There is no suggestion or supporting research that common hardware store OMS (odorless mineral spirits) will affect the paint or surface quality in a detrimental way.

    So as long as you take care to reduce exposure to vapors, you can certainly buy the less expensive hardware store OMS and should not have an impact on the paint quality or finish.


    edwardstevonski
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