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My first en plein air day

Comments

  • Wow, that is a very distinctive style. Love the big tree, very powerful.
    Kaustav
  • I like this bottom one a lot. Love the colors and especially attracted to the tree trunk section - nice shapes and colors. This is just a personal opinion from a painter in progress.
    Kaustav
  • Bottom one is a great composition and has more character as a painterly work. They are both very aggressive. I think the top one lacks something in variation between values that makes the whole thing less interesting as an art piece. I guess the top one looks powerful but incomplete. But that's me you are a lot more knowledgeable of these things and after all, yours is the only opinion that matters. 
    Kaustav
  • Thanks everyone, there are a lot of errors in these paintings. They are not paintings to be honest, they are like sketches. I found out that painting from life is extremely tough compared to painting from photos or in studio environment. It is about seeing the right things, and after 20 minutes you don't see the source, you start to see your painting more. You ruin colors, values, shapes. But I am sure things will be amazing after a year. I won't make the value errors that arise from painting from a photograph. I will have enough sketches and highly trained eyes.  :)
    jswartzartKschaben
  • Bravo, I haven't tried plein air yet but want to. I'm glad you enjoyed it and gonna give it another go. It seems like a lot of fun!
    Kaustav
  • edited May 2017
    Very Van Gogh, Kaustav. I like the second one best. Sketches don't have to look "finished". They can be fine works of art in their own right or they can serve as material for more developed  studio paintings. Your strategy of practicing outdoors is a good one. It hones the ability to really see what is there and builds skills.  All artists, especially aspiring landscape artists, would benefit from it.
    Kaustav
  • Thanks @jswartzart  and @tassieguy The main problem is that the light is always changing! You see a shadow and a well-lit are and when you look again it is not there. Looking and painting faster is extremely important.

    One advantage is that my set-up is so small, that I could paint anywhere and anytime. When you paint you don't notice that it is a small painting that you are working on though.
    Forgiveness
  • edited May 2017
    When I used to paint en plein air, just for me, I found that choosing a two hour slot at a time on one location and revisiting this same location with similar weather for 2,3 or 4 visits, same time of day to complete a painting. I found this to be most enjoyable. I used to work in watercolor. I used to be able to take water from the river in the beginning days but not so by 1981 and had to bring my own water from home. I firmly believe that oil painting outdoors will really do well for me. I also understand that it is good not to expect too much from yourself for first few visits outdoors and things get quickly better from there. Your progress is fantastic already!
    Kaustav
  • edited May 2017
    Thanks everyone! These two small boxes from Utrecht and Julian are good ones to have for yourself if you don't want to carry too much, but can produce small but finished paintings. The ones from Utrecht are extremely pricey here so I had to make my own from the scratch.
    httpimagesutrechtartcomproductsoptionLargeUtrechtThumbbox_open1jpg
    Image result for julian thumb box

    jswartzart
  • I'm not schooled in art and art history so maybe I'm wrong but I thought when artists went out the way Kaustav is doing they made rough sketches with pencils/charcoal, crayons or watercolors then went back to their studios to develop an oil painting. Alternatively they sort of set up temporary living arangements and painted on location with a more complete arrangement of easel and supplies.
    Forgiveness
  • edited May 2017
    @BOB73 ,This used to be so until about sometime in the sixties. Sometimes an artist would be invited to paint for the client on location overseas, with accommodations and food provided with pay as well! Outdoor painting was not so popular in the 60's and on, until recently! Today there are more and more artists painting outside than ever before in history, everywhere! Many find it quite peaceful and meditative. Although if you are in a location where there is traffic, at least carrying a pair of earbuds with you are helpful.
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