Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

You can send an email to [email protected] if you have questions about how to use this forum.

My first en plein air painting

edited March 2017 in Post Your Paintings
Did this in half an hour in almost no light to test my homemade panel. This may not be the best plein air painting but everything has a starting point. Besides having almost no light was another problem that I had to deal with. Hope you guys like it!  :)
Richard_PBOB73RonHopWIKENSummertassieguyrautchetandavelanderForgivenesssvelasque4s1some

Comments

  • Moody feel to it. I like the brushwork (as usual with your art). How did you find the panel?
  • I made them. This is just half inch ply and gesso. 
  • No, I meant how did you like using them.
  • Better than canvas but needs to be a little bit more smooth.
  • Great job on both @Kaustav . But why do you want smoother? With the way you like to lay on the paint I would guess you would want a lot of tooth... like raw canvas.
  • aha!! moon nearing dol purnima! lovely moody painting!!!!
    Kaustav
  • I like this one a lot.  I hope that you weren't in any danger while painting it.  Did you have to pull insects off the canvas while painting?  Was there a bibigah nearby?
  • edited March 2017
    Looks good, @Kaustav . Values and colours are right - that's just how it looks on a moonlit night. I think I could recognise your paintings now by the brushwork.
    Kaustav
  • When you say ply does that infer MDF or plywood. Sorry if that seems like a weird question
    Kaustav
  • @BOB73 I am trying to get away from canvases. They are unnecessarily expensive even though cost of making was very low (China you know). I feel like being cheated whenever I buy canvases! Also, I prefer working on rigid surfaces. Canvas boards are not durable and their coarse weave actually ruined my two brushes.
    I realized that I don't need a smoother board, just need to put a coat of oil which i didn't in the above panel and it took some time and effort to cover the panel.
  • edited March 2017
    @anwesha I saw it out of the varandah and I felt like capturing it. I had to do it really fast because the moon was going away!
    anwesha
  • @Summer none of that sort but there were a few mosquitoes and it was very disturbing!  :s plein air is not a joke, that's what I realized.
    SummerForgivenesssome
  • @RonHop that's plywood. It's cheap and tough. Half inch won't bend. 
  • @Kaustav What kind of wood facing does your plywood have?
  • Not sure @BOB73 all I could say is that those three panels are the best kind of plywood I have ever seen. Extremely high quality, smooth, nice sheen. Avaen the layers looked beautiful!
  • Very beautiful, like the brush strokes, captured the mood real well, even though it is in the dark you managed to capture these colors, especially captured the light quite well. Looks like a full moon and I get the feeling of it. I used to work in plein air for years and there are many challenges there, things moving, things changing all the time, the light changing, all moment by moment. And then you have weather, insects, birds, animals that visit maybe looking for food, and sudden temperature changes, humidity, dryness, etc.,.... Lots of fun!!! It's a whole other dimension in painting. Would you try it again sometime? I know of artists who painted plein air, in oil, in winter in cold snow!, I would never! I much prefer working indoors now.
  • @Forgiveness I prefer working indoors. But I don't care about insects etc. What I feel intimidating is over-inquisitiveness of people. Today working outdoors is not possible cause I don't enjoy painting cities. I want to paint the Sun, the sea, sky, fields, people working there, hard life in villages, nature. 
    May be after sometime in 10-20 years I will go to Shantiniketan in Birbhum with a bagfull of canvas, paint and an easel to paint that place from life. But only thing that I'm sure is that it won't look anything like today's plein air paintings! They are absolutely lifeless to me. Nature without the association of life is like painting a flat plastic sheet as a subject.
    Forgiveness
  • Kaustav said:
    Not sure @BOB73 all I could say is that those three panels are the best kind of plywood I have ever seen. Extremely high quality, smooth, nice sheen. Avaen the layers looked beautiful!

    It's probably birch or some kind of hard wood then. Pine or softwood plywood in America (even the cabinet grade stuff) is not very smooth and full of voids in the laminated layers. Hard to find nice plywood these days :/

  • Kaustav said:
    @Forgiveness I prefer working indoors. But I don't care about insects etc. What I feel intimidating is over-inquisitiveness of people. Today working outdoors is not possible cause I don't enjoy painting cities. I want to paint the Sun, the sea, sky, fields, people working there, hard life in villages, nature. 
    May be after sometime in 10-20 years I will go to Shantiniketan in Birbhum with a bagfull of canvas, paint and an easel to paint that place from life. But only thing that I'm sure is that it won't look anything like today's plein air paintings! They are absolutely lifeless to me. Nature without the association of life is like painting a flat plastic sheet as a subject.
    After a while, you will get used to the people. For me, it was very tough at first.  I'm sure you will have some positive encounters. Allow me to encourage you. You may sell a painting or two that way. People will get to know you, the artist. I have had some real nice encounters myself. Even though, I would much rather be in my studio without distractions, except for the view I might have.
     ... FWIW... There was an artist around here who would paint some one's home/farm inside his car, and when he was done, he would knock on the door of the homeowner and offer them the first chance at buying the work. Of course, a family I know of; they have one hanging over their fireplace mantle. They couldn't resist buying it. He created his own exposure. Exposure can be good, as long as it's safe. 
    Kaustav
  • @some "Exposure can be good, as long as it's safe." You said that right, thank you, this is so very important. I plan to paint scenes and things around my home town, as people recognize themselves or important things to them, they will buy. And many like this "1st chance at it" kind of purchase. And it is not uncommon to see some artists with camping vehicles as travelling studios! 
    Kaustav
Sign In or Register to comment.