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edited July 2016 in Color Mixing
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  • @Candora check out the "Mixing skin tones with a limited palette" discussion in this category
  • edited July 2016
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    jat
  • I'm in the same boat Candora!
    [Deleted User]
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  • Almost all flesh colors/tones are a form of orange, unless the model is in an extreme environment such as stage lighting, or standing near a neon light, etc.  The trick with basic flesh colors is not to make it too red or too neutral.  One makes the model look related to fresh boiled lobsters, or like they're deathly ill.  Thus, your flesh colors become an exercise in subtlety.  Since you are following the DMP method, mixing your basic colors won't be as much a problem as it will be finding methods to neutralize heavy-handed flesh colors.  Some artists mix strings of neutrals to use in neutralizing too-strident colors.   I make my neutral string out of a mix of about two-thirds ivory black and one third raw umber, lightened with cremnitz white in 5 to 7 values.  For me, the process is to mix a flesh tone as close to the final color/value that I need, and then add a neutral of the same value to kill the stridency.  You can achieve the same thing using the DMP method by blues and greens to town down the red/orange in your mix.
    [Deleted User]jat
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  • As posted here skin color s are just variations on orange. I would start out with a basic color recipe, depending on the skin color of the person I was painting. Ascertain your values and reduce those values in terms of their numbers, to a degree, to highlight contrasts as well as simplify all the various color choices given in a patch of skin. Determine the temp of the lighting; was it outdoors  clear sky at noon-this is suggestive of cool blue light with warm shadows. Early morning/ towards evening sunset beginning to set-warm orange yellow light and cool shadows. At 10 or 2 in the afternoon-i's rather equal in terms of temp. With the latter time you can determine if your shadows or your light is warm or cool (the choice is arbitrary and up to the artist) but definitely choose between cool light warm shadows or warm light cool shadows-for their contrasts. Example palette for Caucasian skin tone:
     A base of cadmium scarlet, cad. lemon, t. White, phalo green. Cool light add to the base p.Rose, Ultramarine blue and T.white, cool shadow add to base alz.crim and Ulta.Blue, warm shadow add to base Cad.Scarlett and alz crim, warm ligt add to base P. rose. This palette is from Chris Saper portrait artist, I have a couple of her books I have found useful
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  • edited June 2016
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    jat
  • Very nice!

    You could try other still life instead of going straight to portraits if that is easier?
    [Deleted User]
  • That's beautiful, Candora! It makes me want to have another go at painting flowers.
    [Deleted User]
  • edited July 2016
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    [Deleted User]davidwwilsonBoudiccadencal
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    [Deleted User]
  • You've done a fantastic job with this, Candora. The hair and the skin tones are great. I'm going to enjoy watching this one develop. 
  • edited July 2016
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