Question on Photo Paper

Just got my new color printer...and wondering if there are different types of photo paper to buy?

Do you get better quality with glossy...or what? any help appreciated...thanks!

Comments

  • You want glossy for sure.
  • I use HP Premium Plus and sell prints. HP says it is: clay-based, archival, acid free and lignin free paper which is "HP's very best photo paper, delivering professional quality prints that resists fading for up to 115 years".
  • GaryGary -
    edited January 2013
    You might want to have a couple different papers. One high quality (per David and Sue's suggestion) and a lower quality (= cheaper) for when your experimenting with settings or need a quick work copy, etc. This will save the good paper for those times your looking for the best copy you can get.
    sue_deutscher
  • @gary What do you mean by work copy? If you mean something you're going to use as a reference for color or for color mixing, it needs to be glossy (and should also be the best copy you can get!).
  • edited January 2013
    DAVID QC...thanks for the quick reply...is there any specific brand thats better then another? I am going to be using these for reference and color mixing..so I don't want to skimp on this step and want the best I can buy...

    Since I started Mark's method, I've been using "lousy" prints from local photo shops...because I didn't have a color printer...so I hope to see lots of improvement in my work...that I know good photos will help...

    SUE: thank you ..this sounds like what I'm looking for

    GARY: thanks to you too Gary....appreciate your input as well
  • @Mark_Carder will have to jump in here as I don't know anything about printers besides the fundamentals. If you're using an Epson printer I think it's "Premium Glossy Photo Paper" or something like that.
  • GaryGary -
    edited January 2013

    @gary What do you mean by work copy? If you mean something you're going to use as a reference for color or for color mixing, it needs to be glossy (and should also be the best copy you can get!).

    @David_Quinn_Carder I agree with your last statement David...that's not what I meant by a work copy (poor choice of wording on my part). I often make copies of pictures that I might paint in the future with references on the back on where I found the picture (I don't use 99% of them but it's like a little reference library), copies of a subject I'm painting and I use the back of the work copy to write notes to myself for future reference (do lots of that), copies of cropped pictures I hang on a wall to see if I like the crop or not (pin them on my studio wall for several days - a composition thing, not a color thing), etc. None of these work copies are used as a reference for color or color mixing or anything else that requires accurate color...I use the good, expensive paper for that. I go through lots of photo paper (maybe I'm odd that way) and find a 'two paper' system works for me. :)
  • @gary I thought you might have meant that, I was just making sure! Makes sense… the nice paper is expensive.
  • Don't skimp on your paper, go with Epson premium glossy, or whatever brand of printer you have, use that brand, The inks are calibrated with their specific paper, different papers will produce different color.
  • Mark....I've been checking different papers out..my printer is a Canon...they have a Professional Quality High Gloss paper (top of the line) and next one down is a Glossy 2 paper (high Performance) ...confused about the high gloss vs regular gloss??

    Also, should I buy the largest size that my printer will print...I plan on using the grid method of photos for larger paintings...??

    You can tell, I know nothing about photography, printmaking etc...truly appreciate your help...thanks!

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