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Writing a CV/Resume - advice?

So I am sending out applications for shows, etc. They want some info, 5x7's etc. And of course a CV.
Now I have really very little to nothing to put there. I have had tons of art lessons all the way up until college. In College I only took one class (it was however an advanced drawing class at North Texas, which allegedly has a very good art dept). So I know the CV isn't going to sell anyone on me, but I want to be able to send something that doesn't look ridiculous. Most of you all have been to Art College. I went to Music School. I've never entertained a profession in any way, in art until lately. During the day I work in Computers. The only thing I can really say is stuff about my style and goals, but I don't see other CV's with much detail on that. comments?advice? anecdotes?

Comments

  • i guess I'm screwed.
  • Ezra

    Don't be distracted by detail and formality. Here is a good site for creative CVs.



    Denis

    Irishcajun
  • All is lost.I'm doomed.
  • Ezra,

    Love your profile pic, I see lot's of "CV" in it.  You speak eloquently.  Keep on keeping on, you got it, whatever it is, you got it.
  • ok. how can i argue with that. hah.
  • nadanada -
    edited March 2016
  • I hope that I'm not stepping on anyone's toes here, but I'm going to include this forum and Mark's course on my CV at the end of two year's time--I've learned so much in just nine months! 
  • David

    Does it need to misrepresent? What about a literal description of your passion and enthusiasm demonstrated by participation in art related activities and events over a long period of time?

    Denis

  • This discussion was informative for me Ezra, thanks for starting it and all those who contributed. I never heard of a "CV" before this discussion.  It helped me learn more about how the art world operates and what it expects from artists who are trying to display and sell their work to the public.
    MeganS
  • This discussion was informative for me Ezra, thanks for starting it and all those who contributed. I never heard of a "CV" before this discussion.  It helped me learn more about how the art world operates and what it expects from artists who are trying to display and sell their work to the public.
    In the USA, they call it a resume. 
  • Just tell your story.  Plain and simple.  No need to do more than that.  The folks that read it are are just interested in learning more about.  
    Some artists don’t start painting until their later years.  Keep it simple.  
    tassieguyanwesha
  • I find it hilarious that even the art world now requires resumes.  Most people who go into art do it to avoid the drudgery of the corporate world, of which resumes are a necessary evil.  Did Van Gogh or Monet have a resume? I think not.  The art should speak for itself, and attaining notches on your resume should not have to be a goal in and of itself when we're talking about a purely visual medium.   
    I know this is probably motivated by collectors as well wanting to be able to brag to their friends that the artist they bought from has this or that credential or won such and such prize, but then you're starting to drive art into the same realm as wine where you have all the experts giving wine ratings and rich consumers buying based off that when they can't tell the difference between a $1000 bottle or a $10 bottle in a blind taste test.

  • @Csontvary maybe if Van Gogh had a CV he’d have sold more than one painting during his life. 😀.  
    Whenever you have a buyer and seller you have a market and a good gallery director should be able to guide a collector in what can be a difficult market to navigate.  
    But back to the CV... I see it as just a bit of history and info about the artist that helps the gallery or buyer understand more about the artist.  I think it’s also a good idea for the artist to be able to talk about their paintings.  Some artists (including myself) find it uncomfortable talking about themselves and their work. But it’s something that you have to get used to.  
    But it all depends on what your goals are.  Some artists aren’t interested much in showing their work or entering competitive shows, and that’s fine too.  
    Csontvarytassieguy
  • edited November 10
    Keep it simple. Judges don't want to read waffle. Here's a real example of a CV that might be useful.  If you haven't yet entered any shows or competitions or had an exhibition then leave that section out. If you are entering your first competition just give your basic details and a brief paragraph about the work entered. (See below)


    Name: _____________

    D.O.B 1950

    Education

    B.A. Dip. Ed. LLB GDLP

    Began painting 2016
     

    Exhibitions & Awards

    2020  
    - Solo exhibition, Collville Gallery, Hobart, Tasmania

    2019   
    - Finalist - Lloyd Rees Art Prize, Colville Gallery, Hobart
    - Finalist - Henry Jones Contemporary Art Award Finalist

    2018  
    - Huon Valley Community Bank Branches Award Winner
    - Annual Artists Show, Colville Gallery
    - Henry Jones Contemporary Art Award Winner Peoples Choice Award

    2017
    - Huon Valley Community Bank Branches Award Winner
    - Lloyd Rees Art Prize, Finalist

    2016
    - Huon Art Prize winner

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Paragraph about the work entered:

    Example: This is my interpretation of the landscape around my home. My aim was to describe the landforms broadly,  while still ... etc, etc
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hope this is helpful.  :)
    StephanHM
  • @Csontvary I should also add, for just a bit more ‘color’, that I do agree, in what you infer, that good art doesn’t need a CV.  There’s a saying that good art is inherent in the artwork and great art is conferred upon the artist.  There are a lot of great artists that are never confirmed.
    tassieguy
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