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Jim, first three hours of a multiple day pose. Figure study from life, charcoal on paper, 16" x 20"

Comments

  • Nice drawing. Would love to see it worked up as a painting.
    dlonergan
  • Nice drawing. Would love to see it worked up as a painting.
    Thank you! I would too, but I confess, I don't have a clue where to start!
  • edited February 2016
    Kingston said:
    Can I be critical? You seem to have worked only on the contours of the figure. 
    Kingston, I totally agree with you, on all accounts. "Jim" was done in a figure drawing class where I was instructed to draw, in pencil, an envelope/outline for every figure, followed by an outline for every shadow shape and every shape within a shadow shape, which then had to be filled in with shading (a process that I always felt was a bit like painting by numbers), somehow achieving subtle transitions. The preferred method for creating the contours and shadow shapes was "sight-sizing". I am not sure where "sight-sizing" came from, but it seems to have been invented about a decade ago. Personally, I have always used comparative measurements, occasionally, perhaps too often, digressing into "eyeballing".

     "Jim" is the last piece of work that I did using the preferred method and was a bit of a rebellion. I broke all the rules trying to get a little life into the drawing and still didn't manage it.

    Here is the last "finished" pencil drawing I did from life, just before Jim, following the rules set out for me. The model held/returned to this pose for about 6 weeks. I like the drawing well enough, but I think that the figure is as stiff as the pedestal that she is leaning on. 


    Here is a life drawing that I did about 25 years ago, or rather, two drawings on the same piece of paper:  Still some contour, perhaps too much, but much freer.  I might even have added the contour after the shading. Kind of looks that way to me as I view the drawings now.  I don't remember how long these poses were - short, probably - maybe 10 or 15 minutes each. Personally, I like these drawings a lot better.  


    I am a drop out from that particular school, and, in my heart, feel that I have taken hundreds of steps backwards. I am 65 now - not sure if I have enough time to get back back to where I was a quarter of a century ago.

    The take away --- if the school, teacher, workshop, method, whatever, isn't working for you, move on...



    dencal[Deleted User]
  • Kingston said:
    I spent 20 year not painting. You can do it.                Reply:   :)
  • dlonergan

    Nice work. No harm trying new approaches. Each has plusses and minuses. The experience builds you skill repertoire. 

    As as a general observation I find the more formal and rigorous the procedure, the less life in the drawing.

    Denis
    [Deleted User]
  • dencal said:
    dlonergan

    Nice work. No harm trying new approaches. Each has plusses and minuses. The experience builds you skill repertoire. 

    As as a general observation I find the more formal and rigorous the procedure, the less life in the drawing.

    Denis
    Denis, I agree, at least on the second statement. As to experience building skill repertoire, in general I agree, but in the specific, it may take me a bit of distance and time to come around to the benefits of a more formal approach. 
  • You have a great eye and feel for the human figure, dlonergan . 

    Thank you, davidwwilson. The Arts Council in my city has drop-in figure drawing sessions on Tuesdays - that is my next plan for continue work on the figure. Re: lack of color information, I have been studying color value in an online course and recently completed an assignment to paint a simple subject using three tube colors: a pure red, pure yellow, and pure blue. The assignment was also in color mixing, so we had to make green, violet, and orange and use the green, violet and orange to paint the painting. I challenged myself to match the values of the photograph I was using to paint a realistic picture. The photo didn't have much color information - black cat, not purple, on a tan sofa cushion looking out a window the view from which was completely blurred by the depth of field that I chose. "Moonpie", is the result.  I think I could try a similar approach with a figure drawing.
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