A 3-Step Method for Strong Compositions

Folks

This is a good technique.

Extract: from Ian Roberts book promotion
A 3-Step Method for Strong Compositions
When you assess your photos, I would recommend three steps--all of them moving toward finding a main design or composition: (1) cropping to eliminate the deadwood, (2) drawing a road map of the design and (3) eliminating everything that doesn't enhance that design.
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Denis
EstherH[Deleted User]SummerBOB73

Comments

  • Denis what do you mean by drawing a road map....thumbnails ?
  • dencaldencal -
    edited September 2015
    Marieb

    Yes, it could be thumbnails, but the essential element Roberts is talking about is the arrangement of shapes and values that will contribute towards an attractive, balanced and interesting design.
    It's about giving yourself an opportunity to play with the picture. For example, 'will this church tower look best in the centre of the canvas?' , ' could I adopt a viewpoint from the building opposite to eliminate the tapering effect of perspective?', ' what if the streets were wet and reflected some colour?' , ' what about a large tree to balance the tonal mass .... Etc, etc.

    I find that still life painting forces me to ask this type of question, not so a landscape or portrait that I tend to accept at 'face' value and start to draw without consciously taking the best opportunities to improve the design.

    Denis
    BOB73
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