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Any purpose to color match tube colors?

For years I painted with the same palette. Warm and cool yellows, reds, blues, a neutral orange, dioxazine purple, burnt sienna and white. I have been drawn to limited palettes as of late, experimenting with ancient colors, etc. This led me to Geneve paints. I'm having a blast with them.

But here is my question, and it's genuine, not a "gotcha". Why does the Geneve website give the percentage formulas to mix tube colors, Paynes gray, Venetian red, Naples yellow, etc.? If the focus is on color matching what is observed from a photo or life what would be the need for mixing paint to match tube colors? I'm assuming it's just to demonstrate that these colors can be mixed. Is that correct? Is there another reason or purpose to trying to match a certain color from the 5 colors that you could buy already mixed?

Thanks in advance for an answer.
[Deleted User]SummerRon

Comments

  • RichMak said:

    If the focus is on color matching what is observed from a photo or life what would be the need for mixing paint to match tube colors? I'm assuming it's just to demonstrate that these colors can be mixed. Is that correct?

    This is correct. It's just "proof" that those colors are within the range of the palette, to ease concerns of would-be customers.

    I will copy/paste some additional comments I made when this topic came up back when we first posted the first formulas:

    The biggest help the chart gives [people who do want to premix a matched "tube color"] is that it tells you what NOT to use when mixing it. If a color formula only includes brown, blue, and yellow, you will know only to use those three colors, and you won't have to fight contamination from white or red. In some cases, mixing the wrong color in will prevent you from mixing a color no matter how much paint you add (practically speaking), so the chart tells you "it's about this much brown, this much blue, and this much yellow", and then you do the final tweaks yourself against your own swatch of the tube color you're trying to match and you only tweak with those three colors.

    In the future we will sell empty sealing jars designed for the paint. You buy empty jars from us with our Geneva label and a blank for writing the color name down, and you keep it with your other jar colors. And of course you don't have to stick with established colors. Want a slightly warmer Cadmium Yellow? Go for it, make it up, call it "Lemon Sunset" or whatever you want. :)

    GERARD61Summer
  • Thanks David for your patience. I found information I requested in my first post in another sub forum. Looks like this question was answered before as well. I am trying to catch up with the backlog of topics, but it's a work in process.
    Your answer makes perfect sense to me.
  • @RichMak It's not your fault, the search engine on this forum is terrible. I use Google for searching instead, and need to implement Google search or something halfway decent soon. No time!
    Kaustav
  • I am so happy that I learned to use the basic 5 that Mark recommends. It's rare that I have to step out and buy any other color except of course Turquoise.
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