new color-matching chart for Geneva Artists' Oil Color

Mark_CarderMark_Carder admin
edited June 2015 in General Discussion
I'll be talking about this more in tomorrow's video, "The Benefits of a Limited Palette", but you can go ahead and check it out here: genevafineart.com/color/#chart

There is a printable version available as well. We will be adding MANY more colors to the list in the months ahead, but these are just a few I've already done.
[Deleted User]SummerCastillodencalrgrgreendlIrishcajunTonybhilat

Comments

  • Thank you Mark, your effort is appreciated!
  • This is great. Can I make one suggestion? A swatch showing an example of the color you're mixing would be a helpful visual.
  • David, very informative response. But I'm curious, how did y'all arrive at those precise percentages?
    Eliza
  • edward said:

    David, very informative response. But I'm curious, how did y'all arrive at those precise percentages?

    Big syringes full of paint, with ml marks. Then some math. :-)

    edwardrgrElizacadia
  • Big syringes full of paint...
    Heh, I thought it must be some sort of machine like the paint matching gadget at hardware stores.
    Eliza
  • dencaldencal -
    edited June 2015
    Kingston

    These colours are base pigments from which to mix values to match a subject.
    That is they are the equivalent of tube colors. For example I like Naples Yellow and Yellow Ocher as a component of skin tones.

    I appreciate having the correct pigments and the proportions to mix these tube colors using Geneva pigments.

    Denis
  • Mark_CarderMark_Carder admin
    edited June 2015
    I understand that people become accustomed to painting with certain colors. But myself I have never used anything but the five colors my entire career, so I do not speak from experience. But If I'm trying to match raw umber and I miss it and my raw umber ends up a little green, I ask, why not use this color, why is raw umber more special than this arbitrary color that I just mixed.
    edward[Deleted User]Ron
  • edward said:

    David, very informative response. But I'm curious, how did y'all arrive at those precise percentages?

    Big syringes full of paint, with ml marks. Then some math. :-)

    Thanks. I, too, was scratching my head about percentages. I imagine Geneva paint is quite fluid, then.

  • Fourthly, other manufacturers might take issue with the way their color is displayed, because they end up doing it subjectively (just like we would) in order to portray the color. Especially when we have the same color by two different manufacturers. And going back to point #2, if we try to do it consistently, many of the colors simply won't be accurate due to screen limitations.

    Huh? Do other manufacturers hold some sort of print copyright on color value and intensity of their published color swatches?

    I agree with your explanations 1 through 3.

    FWIW: I picked up a color swatch book (without actually looking at it first) only to discover it was a waste of $10.

    Once again the video (and color mixing percentages), I am reminded of the shades of college "Color Studies" courses.

    You really cannot measure x number of color drops of one color mixed with another color to achieve a desired color result.

    Color juxtaposition and interaction affects desired outcomes.

    Ultimately, it really is all in the "eye of the beholder" "thingy". (You must look and see, and always check values and intensities of color.) (Sorry, if this sounds a bit cliche (and redundant to what Mark has already described in all of his videos) but it rings true in color studies.)

    Perhaps for some, it would be helpful to describe basic color theory concepts.

    Can you describe for your students, some of the basic elements of color interaction, in your future videos?

    For instance: How complimentary colors (since we are working with a limited primary palette) positioned against (and/or mixed with) each other, creates color subtraction? Vibrating and vanishing boundaries? How grey absorbs the complimentary color of another color?

    Color theory is not easy to do, and takes much practice.
  • Kingston:

    I've only ever worked with a limited palette. Cad Yellow, Alzarin Crimson and Prussian Blue. I have never really used tube black. (My HS teachers always talked about "tubey" color, and warned me to stay away. I guess they were purists, in a sense; trained classically like the painters, which Mark Carder describes here.)

    Then, in college color studies courses I saw how gray affects a color (based on Itten's and Albers' texts); how colors vibrate (or not) against each other (when using homogeneous color aid paper). It opened my eyes to the illusions of color.

    One of Mark Carder's techniques that amazes me, is his homogeneous color mixtures. If only I had that sort of patience.

    I have yet to duplicate the color I see. However, I know many painters who have.

    After reading and watching here on this site, I am willing to go back and attempt to create value and intensity scales again.
  • Thanks. I'll try using ultramarine blue (a purer, more balanced, blue) over Prussian (which has more yellow).

    Prussian especially appeals to me most when it's mixed with yellow; I also love the teal shades it creates with white.
  • When I first hit on Marks 5 color concept I jumped on it. I saw how he was able to match any given tubed paint except touquoise. That was it for me and I've stuck with it. I am still very happy with this way of working.
    The only trouble I have with the new Geneva paints is that they are too creamy for me.
    I like the richness of pigment but the drying time is not something I can work with because I tend to blend a lot. I've seen Marks portrait paintings as well as his landscapes and I think they are superb. Perhaps I'll find another way to use the Geneva paints.
  • Ron said:

    the drying time is not something I can work with because I tend to blend a lot.

    My paintings have always taken weeks to dry. And, I tend to blend a lot too.

    However, Mark Carder's technique cautions painters not be too anxious to blend, but rather primarily focus on color gradations (steps). Color value, and color saturation.

    Though it has not been stated specifically, it seems that Mr. Carder paints in an alla prima (wet on wet) technique; with the intention to finish the painting in one or two sittings. His results are quite beautiful.

    I was taught to paint in glazes, or in the style of Grisaille. So, due to my medium recipes, my paintings have always seemed to take forever to completely dry. And, then when completely dry they take on this glossy appearance.

    I look forward to working with Geneva paints in the future, especially for the specific homogeneous paint pigment quality.
  • David, very informative response. But I'm curious, how did y'all arrive at those precise percentages?
    Big syringes full of paint, with ml marks. Then some math. :-)
    I just wanted to check if there was still a chart available for common colors? I saw the old link - http://forum.drawmixpaint.com/discussion/3610/new-color-matching-chart-for-geneva-artists-oil-color - but cannot find anything.

    I appreciate the method means you can find any color eventually and quickly with practice, but for example black being 60/40 ultramarine and burnt umber is a great starting point. Do you still have a chart like this available?

    Would save a lot of money in overly large paint piles for tiny requirements.
  • Thanks BOB73 I found your info very useful.
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