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BEST CANVAS SURFACE FOR A BEGINNER ? fine grain / medium grain / coarse grain ?

Hello Everyone !
I am eager to start learning to paint using the CARDER METHOD and had a query regarding the CANVAS TEXTURE .
Unfortunately I am not able to buy the suggested Linen , at this moment in my life so I just have to make do with basic store bought CANVAS.

I have just dabbled with oil paint a bit and I am a pure-beginner .

I know a few people must have used this method with super success by even painting on something smooth as MASONITE ! (I couldnot find any examples but I will search better and harder )

I know with practice one can work with ANY surface , but i wanted your opinions on what TEXTURE in particular would help a beginner most when it comes to painting on canvas ?

MY MAIN AIM IS TO HAVE SOMETHING WHICH HELPS IN "PULLING THE PAINT OFF THE BRUSH EASIER " for my few beginning paintings .

fine grain / medium grain / coarse grain ?

Comments

  • I'm a beginner too, Gerard, and I'm using store-bought canvas. There's so much to get going starting up; the least of my concerns is the tooth of my canvas. I wouldn't know the difference. The other thing to watch out for is procrastination and fussing over details as an excuse for putting off mixing paint. I know I did my share of that kind of fussing. I'm not saying you are, but just beware. There are some things that matter and some that don't. I am not telling you which are which, you have to ask yourself. I'm just finishing my first painting.
  • GERARD61

    Generally speaking:
    Broad brush impressionist style - coarse grain.
    Fine detail realist representational style - smooth surface.

    Getting the paint off the bush is the task of Mark's slow dry medium (SDM).
    If you are having problems you can also lightly coat the canvas with SDM.

    Denis
    GERARD61
  • I agree with applying the gesso to the store bought canvas. I would put two coats sanding between coats. Don't forget to apply the quick dry white/burnt umber mixture as your final layer. In my opinion that gives a nice painting surface. You want the paint to lay on the surface not sink into the canvas.
  • Hey I am a beginner too. I just started learning Aboriginal Art painting. My trainer has suggested using medium grain canvas surface. I think you should also use medium grain.
  • I am currently using store bought canvas. I bought a roll of primed canvas on sale at Michaels. I also use their professional gallery wrapped canvas but only buy with the 40% coupon or during their huge blowout sale they have once a year. I do coat the canvas with at least 2 more coats of gesso with a final coat of the burnt umber/fast drying white combo. If you want to try a hard surface, I love ampersand's gessobord. A bit pricier, and it feels weird at first, but it's really fun to paint on.

    In the grand scheme of things, I don't feel like it's too big of a deal. Just make sure you coat the canvas with enough gesso that the painting won't break down. Then get to business painting!

    When I sell a painting or two with enough money, I will buy some linen. But not until then. I need to work for that stuff!
  • I am using a fine grain canvas as I am also a beginner and this fine grain canvas is much better than other canvases.
  • I've been using Masonite-like pressed board for several years. A 4X8 foot sheet of it costs about $10. It can be cut to any size. I paint on the smooth side, but sand it (the smooth side) first, dust it off, and wipe it down with a damp rag. Then, I apply either gesso (two or three coats), or a couple of coats of acrylic matte medium. Then, paint away.

    As for painting on a rigid surface, for several years now, there has been a slow move toward rigid surfaces. Several companies now produce rigid supports, including surfaces made from wood, and even plywood.

    One of the main arguments for rigid surfaces is that less damage (cracking) will occur to the paint on a solid surface. Finally, instead of paying up to $20-$30 for a painting surface, you will find that you are paying something like 75 cents to a dollar or slightly more. I figure I've saved hundreds of dollars over the years by painting on these Masonite-like surfaces.

    Sorry that my comments to this thread are late.
    [Deleted User]Ron

  • @Ronna
    Ronna
    December 2014
    I agree with applying the gesso to the store bought canvas. I would put two coats sanding between coats. Don't forget to apply the quick dry white/burnt umber mixture as your final layer. In my opinion that gives a nice painting surface. You want the paint to lay on the surface not sink into the canvas.

    Ronna, What size or grit of sandpaper do you use for sanding between coats of gesso?
    SusieQ
  • I used a fine grit. It doesn't take much sanding. Just a light amount.
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