Gallery full of wonderful paintings

galleryhenoch.com/index.html

Just stumbled on this site. It has wonderful paintings.

@Rtaeger‌ Check out the waves in Chris Armstrong and Todd Kenyon
@Kingston‌ Check out the flowers (Peonies) of Eric Wert
@Ronna‌ The still lifes in Olga Antonova's gallery remind me of how you apply paint
@TwoPalette‌ This artist uses lighter still lifes: Janet Rickus
@iwanttopaintrealism‌ Vincent Giarrano has paintings similar in style and subject matter to your paintings.

Looking at these wonderful works of art inspire me. My favorite is David Kassan.

I hope looking at these inspire you as they did me.
ebsRonna

Comments

  • David Kassan painted a friend of mine, Jasmine, a musician in San Diego.
    thomas-pr.com/136/photos/ambientdesignipadpainting.html
  • ebsebs -
    edited October 2014
    Interesting that you linked to this particular gallery. I stumbled upon it aswell earlier. David Kassan is a great artist. Had the pleasure of speaking with him after he gave a talk at the National Portrait Gallery in London this summer. One of his paintings was exhibited there in the BP portrait award exhibition.
  • @MeganS You have excellent taste. Gallery Henoch is one of my favorite galleries in NYC. I also like David Kassan. But I love Daniel Greene and Burt Silverman.

    http://www.galleryhenoch.com/artists/greene/greene.html
    http://www.galleryhenoch.com/artists/silverman/silverman.html
  • kevinTO said:

    David Kassan painted a friend of mine, Jasmine, a musician in San Diego.
    thomas-pr.com/136/photos/ambientdesignipadpainting.html

    Thank you for that link! I like up close, detailed shots of paintings. So soft with subtle movement.
  • @MikeO‌ , I really like Burton Silverman too. He has the more painterly feel I would love to do with portraits. I think portraits fair better with more movement in the painting to give it a less static appearance. Still lifes are perfect for the tight edges like the painting style of Daniel Greene.
  • Thank you @MeganS. I'm not familiar with her work. It's wonderful.
    Yes, it is inspiring. Thanks for pointing these out.
  • I can't even imagine trying to paint Roughage by Eric Wert. It's fantastic.
  • Ronna said:

    I can't even imagine trying to paint Roughage by Eric Wert. It's fantastic.

    I know! Just the background makes me nervous.
    Ronna
  • I found another artist! bryanlarsen.com/ He uses the same methods as DMP and somehow is able to create luminosity. He also transfers his drawings from paper to canvas with charcoal on the back of the drawing. Seems tedious, but it's working for me too. He has a blog called ON the easel with detailed shots. Wow. Just wow. Just keep painting, just keep painting....
  • @MeganS‌ Bryan Larsen's work looks great. Where do you find all of these artists?
  • @MikeO‌ Researching. Looking at different techniques. I'm following the flemish technique on a portrait right now. It takes advantage of my drawing ability and my past experience with values with the dead layer. We shall see if it works. I'm really afraid that I might have a great piece but one that either won't dry or crack. After seeing Bryan Larsen's work, I know that luminosity can be possible with DMP, you just have to fudge some of the colors.

    There have been some artists that use the grisaille and layers that work great with flowers as subject matter, but I haven't seen too many that are successful doing this with portraits. (Like this guy briandavisart.com/artwork.html) I think likeness can be lost so easily with multiple layers. I'm giving it a go. Already, after my first dead layer (which didn't completely cover the umber underpainting), I'm losing likeness. My charcoal lines are gone, so I'll just see it to the end and hopefully it'll be at least close. I'm also starting a white rose bouquet in the DMP method and hopefully achieve the light luminosity in the petals.
    MikeO
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  • MeganSMeganS -
    edited October 2014
    @KevinGE‌

    I'm not saying that it's not a good technique for portraits, I'm just finding out with my research (very small sample size) that it must be difficult. (I have a hard time stepping down from a challenge, even if I go through a "oh s#*t!" moment in the middle.) It's hard to judge portraits from long ago on whether or not they have likeness when we don't have a reference.

    Maybe today's society has put too much emphasis on likeness? Maybe it should be mean more than that?

    I was never taught how to paint either way. I've only heard of the Flemish technique and alla prima just recently. Most artists do something in the middle of both. They use a value study out of the under painting of thinned oil paint or a charcoal drawing on top of a burnt umber wash. Both allow the artist to see shapes instead of lines. I like seeing those shapes.

    I hope with many paintings under my belt, I'll have a method that works for me.
  • What a great gallery of work. Thanks for posting. I would like to make a stop there next time I'm in NYC. I'm due for another trip to the MET soon too. (Love that place)
  • MeganS said:

    @KevinGE‌

    Maybe today's society has put too much emphasis on likeness? Maybe it should be mean more than that?

    I really think that this is the case. All the self-portraits we see were mirror images, so they must have seemed a bit "off" likeness when they were painted, but that doesn't detract from their artistic merit at all. To me a great portrait communicates something universal about the human condition through time. Whether it is a close likeness is pretty irrelevant in the long run (although it may be extremely important to the person who commissioned the work).

    BTW in my "regular job" I am often in federal courthouses and congressional hearing rooms that are full of painted portraits, and most of them are pretty bad. Really.
    MeganS
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