Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

You can send an email to [email protected] if you have questions about how to use this forum.

Please let me know what you think of the still-life video...

For those of you who have watched it, please let me know what you think. After months of editing I have the video version of the artists' curse and I have no clue if it is any good.
VangieRonnaKat

Comments

  • Mark, it is absolutely wonderful. As usual it is extremely detailed, very easy to follow and beautifully edited and shot. I downloaded both the HD and Low def versions. Even the quality of the low def one is excellent. As with all your videos I found it truly inspiring and, as I said in a previous post, I cannot wait for my stained canvas to dry so I can get stuck in. I'll most definitely be purchasing every single video you put up here. As. I'm sure, will a lot of people. Thank you again for your generosity. This site is fantastic!
    cynthiagwilson
  • You made my day :-) Thanks for the compliment! :-)
  • Awesome, as usual!!! Thanks heaps again!!!
  • I will be watching it shortly. I'm painting the entire downstairs getting ready for Christmas. I was thinking of your video on the way home from the paint store. Can't wait to watch it!
  • I downloaded the HD version. Just need to make some time to watch. Can't wait! I don't doubt that it will be fantastic. Donna
  • I just saw the video.well Done mark thanks..
    Do you always use your color checker when you paint or only for the videos.?

    Thanks
    Alex ^:)^
  • Mark, what size canvas did you use for this video? Thanks.
  • Totally agree with Charley re possible negative connotations re totally unnecessary apology for the out-of-focus parts... not noticeable at all, if any ... you're the only one who's concerned about it.
    Besides, $20 for over 4.5hours of instructional video is just a token charge, almost a give-away. It's worth a lot, lot more than that, especially with all the hours that you spent on developing it.
    I've announced this video & freebies on FB yesterday. Every bit helps.

    What an exciting time!!! Looking forward to more!
    All the best to your continued success, and David's.
    Mark_Cardercynthiagwilson
  • Mark, I haven't watched the entire video yet, but I've watched the section on drawing and a good bit more. All has been magnificent so far. I think you should remove the third sentence in your description of the video where you apologize for the out-of-focus parts. It's not needed, the problem isn't noticeable, and the only possible effect it could have is to instill a false worry in people who are thinking about purchasing the video. My opinion is not based on the possibility that you may lose a little money--not at all--it's based on the possibility that some people may balk and deny themselves the opportunity to benefit from this wonderful video. If those potential purchasers could see the video in order to judge, I'm sure they would agree.

    I really appreciate that CharleyBoy, I think you are right. It just drove me nuts while editing but I kind of knew it was my perfectionism over thinking it. Ok, I'll have David remove that bit.

    Thanks!

    VangiemyccynthiagwilsonGary
  • I just saw the video.well Done mark thanks..
    Do you always use your color checker when you paint or only for the videos.?

    Thanks
    Alex ^:)^

    When I do most landscapes, almost never, maybe a couple times at the start. But sometimes I do a lot, like in painting portraits or whenever I want to do hardcore realsim I usually check as I lay them in, but then once I have the canvas covered I do very little.

    It is more for value than color, then once I have the values established, so they are all in "sync" - values throughout match - then I play a ton. But that just what I personally evolved into doing. Everyone should do there own thing.

    And depending on your experience, I recommend at least a couple of years of hardcore color matching from life so you can learn to see value and color correctly and instinctively. That means checking every brush full of color before you "guess" (because that is what you would be doing) where it goes.
    cynthiagwilsonGaryTattooArtist
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] admin
    edited November 2012
    Vangie said:

    I've announced this video & freebies on FB yesterday. Every bit helps.

    I was wondering where that Facebook traffic was coming from. :)
    Vangiecynthiagwilson
  • I downloaded the HD but couldn't get it to play. But it doesnt matter because I then downloaded the low def version and the quality is perfect. I only had time last night to fast forward through sections just to check it out until I have time to sit and watch. But what I did see is very informative and well done. Thank you Mark for doing this. And by the way, the website is excellent too!
  • Downloaded the low def version as you know I am in "old europe" here and it took me about 40 minutes...phewww. I did not take into consideration to upload the HD...should I ? For me the quality is fine on this version.
    Anyway...started to watch the first 10 minutes and already learned something new you didn't have on the old vid...the golden lines....I like it, Charley boy is right about that sentence.
    Can't wait to watch more. =D>
  • @ David; where on fb?
  • AmritAmrit -
    edited November 2012
    Just bought my version. Downloading as we speak. Perfect to watch on a cold day.
    At £12 it is an even bigger bargain. Hmm, that's one large kebab and chips or this video, I know what I'd go for. Both :)
    valentin[Deleted User]
  • myc said:

    where on fb?

    I can't track that, at least not yet.
  • I have watched the drawing part so far and its really helpful. I especially liked the fact that you tackled a complicated shape, the elephant statuette, and explained how to do it by boxing in the outer dimensions and using the proportional divider to check angles.

    Martin
  • Vangie said:

    Mark, what size canvas did you use for this video? Thanks.

    18 inches x 29.5 inches

  • Finally got the video downloaded and am just starting to watch it... I'm very early into it and liking what I'm seeing. Vangie asked the size of canvas, but how do you decide the scale of the painting compared to the set-up. May be a dumb question, but I've never done a still life before and if I use the vertical golden line at the mason jar as the starting point, for example, and continue leftwards, I will either run out of space or have too much space at the far left of the canvas. Do you simply use proportional dividers to measure your set up and then decide how to fit it all on the canvas?

  • @ David: sorry misunderstanding. I thought you did announce it on fb,
  • @myc When you want to alert someone to a post you're responding to with the @ sign, it only works if you don't put a space between the symbol and the name, and you have to put the full username of the person you're responding to. It's not necessary unless you want to make sure someone sees your response (so in a thread someone is actively participating in, there's no need generally).
  • mycmyc -
    edited November 2012
    @David_Quinn_Carder Ok thanks very much for the information!
  • I think this is a very well produced, well edited video - Charley was absolutely correct in his suggestion!

    The video is to the point, high in pertinent information and low (as in none!) in bs that is so common in many instructional videos. I agree with the positive comments made by all those above. I would also like to add comments regarding two additional aspects of the video that struck me.

    First, is 'balance'....the video is edited so that it is almost exactly equally divided between getting ready to paint and then actually painting. The message is that no matter how excited you are to start and how much you want to immediately jump right into putting paint on canvas, proper 'prep work' (drawing, mixing puddles of paint, etc) is key to being successful when you actually start to apply paint to the surface....it will also save a ton of frustration, frustration you will experience if you skip the prep work!

    The second aspect of the video which struck me is the pace, rhythm, tempo (however you use wish to describe the way the information is presented). It moves along but is unhurried. It's not a lecture but more of a conversation (sometimes with yourself Mark! :) ). It is easy to listen to and easy to watch. When it was done, I was struck with this thought: "I can do that"! This is the highest compliment I can give any form on instruction or any instructor. :)
    VangieLizONeal
  • I agree Gary, I have an old mineral spirits bottle that I have never painted because of all the white staining on it..... Now I am dying to try and paint it. Hey....it could be my paint something white in the challenge! I love to watch Mark paint!
  • No wonder you're a gold star boy, Gary!!! Very well put!!! :)
  • Thank you Gary and all! All I see are things I want to change.
  • edited December 2012
    I thought it was great and you really did a quality job of just diving in and painting in the last ~2 hours. Twenty bucks for a four-hour-long instructional video is very generous.

    I can't wait for more and think it's a great price point compared to $100 and $200 video courses on all the other sites.

    Can't wait for the next one (portraiture, I hope).
    tjs
  • I can't believe the cost of this video! I just downloaded it. It was super simple! It took about 20 minutes to download then I immediately burned it to disc. I have windows 7 so this was also very easy.

    What I have watched so far the quality is excellent and far better than the other art DVD's I have at home. You guys did such an awesome job!

    THANK YOU SO MUCH!
    TattooArtist
  • Thank you Steven and TJ!
  • Mark How Long did it take you to paint the still life from start to finish in real time..
    sketchySteven
  • Good question.

    3 days

    day 1 was penciling and color mixing, real time about three or four hours.

    day 2 painted the blue mason jar, the book, and the bottle - I think about 4 hours

    day 3 I finished it - about another 4.

    Lots of off camera wiping brushes, looking and thinking, fixing cameras, waiting for some helicopter fly over (my house is between the lava flows and the airport) etc.

    One thing I would spend a ton of time doing was thinking. Where I might just stare at the still life and think about how I want to tackle something, or just looking at my palette. I cut all that out, so it looks like I am super efficient and fast. But I am not.

    Vangie
  • So about 20 hrs cool thanks..
  • Marc, I purchased the video and am very very happy with it. You have an excellent teaching style. No nonsense and you explain yourself very thoroughly. I would take pride in this video lesson. I have been searching for good oil painting instruction for a couple years now. I worked with watercolors mostly in college so one thing I always found frustrating was the slow drying time of oils. Then I realized maybe I should learn to paint more alla prima so the slow drying time would be a positive thing for me. I now understand that oils need to be as carefully planned as a watercolor and if I avoid mistakes early on then I won't need an area to dry to go back and rework. Are there any other still life videos that you will make available? Thanks for your efforts in teaching and making things affordable.
  • LindenH said:

    Finally got the video downloaded and am just starting to watch it... I'm very early into it and liking what I'm seeing. Vangie asked the size of canvas, but how do you decide the scale of the painting compared to the set-up. May be a dumb question, but I've never done a still life before and if I use the vertical golden line at the mason jar as the starting point, for example, and continue leftwards, I will either run out of space or have too much space at the far left of the canvas. Do you simply use proportional dividers to measure your set up and then decide how to fit it all on the canvas?

    Sorry just seeing this. I will explain that in detail when I film the how to determine canvas size tutorial. But, basically all you do is first figure out how big you want your main object to be. That is up to you, set up your proportional divider accordingly - refer to PD basics video for this.

    Next, just look at your still life and then decide what you want to include - frame it up in your eye or with a camera viewfinder - whatever you got to do. Make note of something in your still life that intersects the spot where you want the border to be. Or put a dime or other small coin at the spot your want your vertical canvas edge to be.

    Now you can measure horizontally from the dime to the other side of the canvas (the should have made note of where you want that to be) with your PD. Just plot points on the floor or a big table so that you have a point defining the left edge of your canvas, and one defining the right (you could use two more dimes).

    Now just measure with a ruler from one dime to the other - that is your canvas width.

    I imagine that is confusing - I'll try to get this vid done soon. Much easier to demo it.

    LindenH
  • Thank you jpost! So glad you find the vids useful! :-)
  • AmritAmrit -
    edited December 2012
    Hi Mark, I have one question regarding this. The level of realism you achieve is just amazing. One I have not been able to achieve.

    image

    image

    I know this was my first attempt at a full method, but do you have any ideas on what I did wrong and where I can improve (ignoring the little rocks as those were very rushed.)
    Mark_Carder
  • Just watched the low def video, which was definately good enough quality for me.
    Very good and great value!
  • Amrit said:

    Hi Mark, I have one question regarding this. The level of realism you achieve is just amazing. One I have not been able to achieve.

    image

    image

    I know this was my first attempt at a full method, but do you have any ideas on what I did wrong and where I can improve (ignoring the little rocks as those were very rushed.)

    I think it is GREAT! Only two big things. One it needs varnish badly, that will help a lot, and second it looks like maybe your whites where not balanced properly. And that has caused your entire painting to be dark. Could just be your photo. But go varnish it with a high gloss varnish, then judge it. As it is, it is so flat I can't even see into your darks at all.

    Watch color checker basics to see how to do that.

    And forget the old DVD, you can watch it once, but it would be better to watch the YouTube stuff, I explain things better now. Some of my old teaching on the tcm dvd is actually plain wrong.

  • Jonny said:

    Just watched the low def video, which was definately good enough quality for me.
    Very good and great value!

    Thank you Jonny! :-)
Sign In or Register to comment.