Warm white HELP

I write to you from Wit's End, USA. There are a surprising number of us here, and I'm not the only one with paint on my clothes. I digress.

I'm working on my still life and cannot, for the life of me, match the lightest color in the rose.

I've mixed the steps in the background, wood surface, and green flowers. I'm (so far) satisfied with those. I know some steps are too small, but I often like to make sure I'm getting the existing colors as close as I can before I move on. Naturally, some new colors will present themselves when I'm "covering the canvas with paint" in the third process Mark talks about. Mixing extra steps before I start helps me to be sure I have "seen" my subject.

In this case, I'm about to see these artificial roses thrown out the window and run over by cars as I look down and scream "serves you right!"

How do I get closer to the lightest color in the rose? What am I doing wrong? No matter what I do, the value looks off. Mine is just too dark. If I start with white, adding yellow makes it a light, bright lemony color. Adding a touch of red makes it too brown. Adding white, it becomes a lighter tan. Adding red, a pinker tan. Around and around I go. What looks like a winner on the palette is way off when checking the color.

To me it looks like a warm white. But I also don't trust me at all yet. I trust the color checker. But at this point the color checker seems to also be holding up its little hands and saying "I dunno, sis." My brain knows these are white flowers that look yellowy because of the warm light. That's why I don't trust my brain and I'm relying on my eye to tell me what the color really is. And it keeps looking whiter and warmer than I can seem to mix.

I've attached photos, but I know the colors in them are not terribly accurate. 

Please give me any advice you have on mixing a brightish warmish white. 

Comments

  • edited November 5
    @Atlanta, you colour looks pretty close. If I were painting those flowers, I'd probably use white, Arylide yellow, yellow Ochre and a touch of Cadmium orange. But it looks as though you are using the limited pallet and are getting the values right but can't quite match the hue. My advice is that it doesn't matter. Mark always says that it's the values that are important and you can get away with a slight difference in hue. So, I wouldn't worry about it. Just get as close as you can with the hue but make sure the values are spot on. 
    Desertskyjudith
  • edited November 5
    @Atalanta - tassieguy had good suggestions. I would add to keep painting. I am guessing that you are relatively new at this - you will get better with practice and feedback. 

    "How do I get closer to the lightest color in the rose? What am I doing wrong? No matter what I do, the value looks off. Mine is just too dark. If I start with white, adding yellow makes it a light, bright lemony color. Adding a touch of red makes it too brown. Adding white, it becomes a lighter tan. Adding red, a pinker tan. Around and around I go. What looks like a winner on the palette is way off when checking the color." 

    If you are adding all these colors to the same nut of white paint, I think you will never get the color and value right. You will get a very light mud color.  A few non-DMP suggestions: if you are dissatisfied with your painting, put it away for a few weeks and look at it with fresh eyes. Before I start a painting, I make on a scrap the value strings of the few colors I will use on the painting: usually the color itself, 2 lighter values and 2 darker ones. I work out any potential problems here rather than on the actual painting. 
  • @tassieguy That's a great point. Getting the values right is what I want most to achieve, and you spotted it—I am using a limited palette. I'll focus on the value and then just tell people I can't remember what color the rose actually was. Ha!

    @Desertsky You make a very interesting point about the light mud color. This is only my second DMP painting. I'll keep going. I'm hoping to really get the DMP foundations/fundamentals down right so that I can have great habits to build on. I'm not afraid of doing something wrong, exactly, more worried that I'm missing something obvious. But as @tassieguy says, values are paramount. Back to the easel!
  • If white and yellow is too chromatic then you need to grey it down. You can try adding red and blue to make a purple which is opposite of yellow. Or you can try just mix a black (blue and burnt umber) and add a tiny bit to a white until you have the same value, but a gray colour.

    Then adding bits of this second pile into your white+yellow first pile you should get to the colour.
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