New book on colour



Very pleased with this arrival newly released.

It may be of interest to some of you.

I already have his excellent The Art Of Still Life
tassieguyA_Time_To_Paintjudith

Comments

  • Nicely photographed. But the book's cover... shouldn't there be a 'u' before the 'r' in 'colour'?
    MichaelD
  • edited October 22
    Thank you @MoleMan,

    Yes that is the correct English spelling but as the artist is American he has spelled it the way that they do  :)
    MoleMan
  • MichaelD said:
    Thank you @MoleMan,

    Yes that is the correct English spelling but as the artist is American he has spelled it the way that they do  :)
     ;) 
  • I've seen that one out and was seriously thinking about purchasing it.  I, too, have The Art of Still Life book and am enjoying that one.
    MichaelD
  • @MichaelID. You've had sight of this book for while now, do you feel able to express an appraisal?
     
    Best rgds, Duncan  :)
  • edited November 9
    MoleMan said:
    @MichaelID. You've had sight of this book for while now, do you feel able to express an appraisal?
     
    Best rgds, Duncan  :)
    Hi Duncan,

    To be honest, with working full time (mental health children and adolescents) its really only the weekends that I have time, so I have not yet. Same with my art and I haven’t done any since may last partial portrait either.

    I have perused the book, but not to any in depth level as yet. From what I have gathered it is pretty comprehensive.

    I will update when I have had a decent delve.
  • Folks

    Here are a couple of editorial reviews. The link below has reviews and ratings by readers who have purchased the book.

    Review

    "In The Oil Painter's Color Handbook, Todd Casey presents priceless information that every art school should teach and every art student should learn. The book breaks down the subject of color into useful pieces of knowledge that painters can put into practice. He analyzes color in terms of light, value, pigment, mixing strategies, palette arrangements, and painting techniques. Each topic is clearly and succinctly explained in the text, illustrated with captions, charts, diagrams, and finished paintings. By the end of the book, the reader will have a clear understanding of how realist painters and illustrators have used color through history." - James Gurney, artist and author 

    “This is the most impressive and complete book on color ever produced. It covers a wide range of color concepts, including some I'd never seen before. It digs deeply into color harmony, techniques, and has powerful examples to demonstrate every concept.” - Eric Rhoads, Publisher, Fine Art Connoisseur Magazine


    https://www.amazon.com/Oil-Painters-Color-Handbook-Contemporary/dp/1580935885

    Denis




    MichaelD
  • Thanks Denis, I was going to suggest checking out published reviews. 
  • edited November 9
    I'll have to get this one. Thanks for posting about it, @MichaelD.  I've neglected theory, eschewing book learning for hands on practice. I've learned a lot this way, but it's time to delve deeper and look at stuff I may never encounter alone.

    But I don't want to buy it through Amazon who I'm very annoyed with. I had a subscription to Amazon Prime which allowed me to listen to and download classical music albums from Prime Music which I listened to on their app. I had a huge library which I'd paid for through my subscription. But then, without warning, Amazon changed the system so all you get is shuffled tracks and I can no longer listen to my albums. I lost my library. I might get the first movement of a symphony and then it launches into some rubbish I don't want to hear. This was to force users to sign up to Prime Music Unlimited for an extra monthly fee. I guess Bezos needs a new jet. I told them to stick it. I cancelled my Prime subscription and bought a subscription to Spotify. I'm ditching my Kindle and getting a different E-reader. I won't buy from Amazon again if I can possibly avoid it. So, if I can get the hardcopy book elsewhere I will. I checked it out on Casey's website. It looks wonderful. 
    judith
  • edited November 9
    @tassieguy

    No worries Rob,
    yes books are great but actually getting down and doing it is is the way, which you have been doing, so a nice balance of both I think.

    Amazon are ubiquitous, im sure that Bozo would rename the planet with his brand name if he could.

    I only ever occasionally do the free trial for Prime just if I am ordering a few items and it makes the delivery fast and free. I cancel it once I have the goods. Im not interested in their Tv/programmes.

    Its a shame they did that with your music, but I am not surprised. They lull you into thinking what you have from them is yours but, as in your example, they are free to mess with it when they choose. 

    My daughter bought me a kindle for my 50th a decade ago. I loved it initially but a few years on, because I didnt religiously update back ups it became defunct.

    I actually much prefer real actual books and of course kindles are useless when it comes to art books..

    I bought this book for about a 3rd cheaper than on Amazon, there is a minor dent on one corner which goes through to a fee pages, but I can live with it.

  • This will give anyone that is interested an idea of what the book contains





    Desertsky
  • You’ve piqued my interest in this book.  Maybe if I’m really good, for the rest of this year anyway,  Santa might present it to me? 😀
    The contents look great and it would be interesting to see how much of what I’ve learned in practice is quantified in his lessons and references.  I think it could also be useful as a tool to analyze how some of my favorite artist have approached color and lighting, etc.

    The only thing I wonder about is his 18 Hue color wheel.  I would think a 19 Hue wheel would be better. 😂 (spinal tap joke there.)

    MoleManMichaelD
  • edited November 10
    @GTO, good stuff.

    I like the spinal tap reference.  :)

     You will be looking at that colour wheel but dont touch or even point at it. 
    GTOMoleMan
  • @Michael, do you mean you get it from somewhere other than Amazon? I'd love to find out where else I can get it.
  • Disregard my last post, @MichaelD. I've found it elsewhere.  :)
    MichaelD
  • MichaelD said:
    MoleMan said:
    @MichaelID. You've had sight of this book for while now, do you feel able to express an appraisal?
     
    Best rgds, Duncan  :)
    Hi Duncan,

    To be honest, with working full time (mental health children and adolescents) its really only the weekends that I have time, so I have not yet. Same with my art and I haven’t done any since may last partial portrait either.

    I have perused the book, but not to any in depth level as yet. From what I have gathered it is pretty comprehensive.

    I will update when I have had a decent delve.
     
    Sincere apologies @MichaelD, I hadn't meant to cause you inconvenience.
     
    Reason I asked is because I have a youngest daughter who has drawn (nearly) all her life and adventured into grown-up watercolour painting around six-years ago. She leapt from there to oil painting earlier this year, is loving it, and is doing it really rather well.
     
    She's in her mid-20s (her mental health is fine, and her adolescence is well behind her :)). Had set her up with a minimal palette of approximate primaries, plus – and as a side dish – a strong green and orange, white and a tube of black... and on condition if I ever saw a thumbprint in the black tube I'd snap all her brushes.
     
    Sounds like a bit of a miserly start perhaps, but a disciplined beginning perhaps can afford subsequently an intelligently spent lifetime developing looseness. I was simply wondering whether the book might be helpful to her in developing her painting skills So thank you for going to the trouble of posting the photo of the Contents pages.
     
    With kind regards, Duncan
  • This looks like a good book. I have not read it. I own almost no art books. If something looks interesting, then I get it out of the library. I am in the US, and acknowledge that this may not be as easy for people living in different countries.

    From the table of contents which MichaelD posted, it looks like the author has written about 20 pages on additive and subtractive light. Since oil painting is always (yikes! how seldom I write "always.") concerned with reflective light, to me this seems like a lot of text which perhaps compares light systems which do not apply to reflected color. 

    Some contextual comments, NOT directed at this particular book:
    Every art book I have read on color has had aspects I disagreed with, or that I thought were just plain wrong. For example, that any color, fully exposed to full spectrum light, would be black. The physics of visible light is really interesting. I just think it is not useful for me as a painter; and I have seen the ways in which a painter gets off track by following uncritically something he or she read in a book. (For about 6-7 years, I taught art, many years ago.) I found the Richard Schmid color chart exercises very useful, from his Alla Prima 2 book. 
  • @tassieguy, glad to hear it Rob, much better to help the small businesses that funding Bozos trips  to space  =)

  • @MoleMan


    Not at all  Duncan no need for apology you hadn’t inconvenienced me. I dont know why I raised the point of my work, other than perhaps I find, at times, it consumes a little too much of my time that I would rather spend painting. But the job has, along with its difficulties, its rewards too.

    Well your daughter may get a lot form it, its hard for me to say. It might make a nice part of an Xmas present though. 
    I find with art books some of course it is repetition and, as with art its is subjective as to whether you enjoy it. I have some that I tend to dip into Occasionally. But really, and this will be no surprise, the learning is in the doing, so to speak.

    I am glad the photo of contents helps, as it may take some time for me to be able to feed back on the book.

    A couple of books I really like (your daughter may too) and I find, is great to dip in and out are Oil Painting Secrets From A Master  (Linda Cateura), and these are from David A. Leffel.

    and
    Problem Solving For Oil Painters (Gregg Kreutz).

    While I wouldnt really expect something from a book to solve my problems it does have useful information.


    In my limited experience I find that problems solving is something that is to be developed within yourself and is part of, if not, the essence of what we do when we paint and create art.
  • edited November 10
    @Desertsky

    I have had a brief look at the section on light but have not digested enough to her able to confidently relay any of it as yet.

    That is interesting that every art book you have read on colour has had aspects that you disagree with.

    Have they often been on the same specific aspects in the different books ?

    Maybe you could give an example.

    I guess there is the factor that we actually, as individuals, see colour and values, to certain degrees, differently. But I am not sure if that is what you are alluding to.

    I love my Alla Prima 2 book by Schmid and am reminded to revisit it.


  • @MichaelD - First, in case I didn't express myself clearly, the Casey color book you have recommended looks very, very good. The area of color theory and application in oil painting is the one that I most often disagree with in art books. You are right, all of us see a little differently. 

    All that I have read - admittedly a small sample of all that are out there - do a poor job in one or more of a few areas:
    - Too much confusing information about subtractive and additive colors - even though oil paint is never electronically projected on a black surface. I have had students, years ago, who read some of these books when teaching themselves painting, and reached several wrong conclusions - the worst being that they somehow could not understand this and so they couldn't be a good painter. 
    - Not enough balance between theory and application. Too much theory, usually. 
    - My pet peeve, meaning I doubt if bothers anyone else, is that color books often do not address color temperature and its relativity to the other colors surrounding it. 
     
    I like the Schmid book because it is the closest to what I envision is most helpful for beginning (and even not so beginning!) oil painters: here is what colors and color combinations act like in oil paint. Here are some examples. Here is how to achieve color harmonies.  Here is an exercise to help you get better. etc.  

    After you read through the new Mr. Casey book, I hope you tell us what its good points are. 
  • The best and most detailed by far explanation of colour and paint mixing is on the Handprint.com site. It's seriously detailed, but an amazing resource:

    http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/water.html
    Desertsky
  • @Richard_P -

    Yes, the Handprint site is one of the best - if not the best - on color. Thanks for reminding us about this. I tend to forget about it because of the emphasis on watercolor, but you are right: this site is a wealth of information about color and color theory. It has been available for free to the world wince 1994!

    I will now spend hours on it this week, refreshing my memory.  ...And of course he deals with color temperature :) 
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