How to transfer a tiled image with mod podge?


I am trying a technique to transfer a drawing, I print an outlined version of my reference (such as the flower I am posting here), then I apply glue or mod podge to a gessoed canvas , wait 3 minutes, remove the paper and voila! the outline is pretty much transfered, then I wait for a day, wet the surface and rub a little whats left.

This works but... If I want to paint a large image I can split the flower in half using 2 A4 prints, then I can tape it togheter to form a complete large image but when I Put it on the canvas there is always a problem when the 2 papers meet and that part gets distorted and damage the drawing.

Anyone here has experience on this kind of transfers? any tip to share?



Comments

  • I have not used mod podge to transfer a drawing and usually use the grid method to make a light sketch.  There is a nice video a ran across that shows how to transfer a drawing onto your canvas that might be helpful.  Here is a link to a YouTube video  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zf38peykm8c&t=6s
  • I once did an oil transfer. I just painted thin layer of cheap raw umber on the back of the source - which was A4 paper, and it then works like carbon paper. Care needed on placement, yes. I taped it down with painter's tape to avoid shifting.
  • Alexev

    Your question is about enlarging an image. It seems you have the mod podge technique settled.
    The easiest transfer is by coating the back of the print with contrasting dry chalk or pastel. Place face up on your canvas and over draw your design.

    I would advise against the use of any transfer medium that remains between the gesso and the oil paint layers. Whilst not toxic mod podge contains half a dozen chemicals that may interact, migrate, stain or swell up causing cracking, delamination or colour changes.

    Look at the following methods for enlarging an image; proportional dividers, pantograph, grids, projectors, camera Lucida. Many computer graphics programs allow any image to be greatly enlarged and then accurately tiled to print out an A4 mosaic of perhaps sixteen sheets to make a mural.

    Best of all, to train your eye and hand coordination, use a freehand pencil or charcoal along with basic units of measure, such as a head length, to draw confident lines from the shoulder on your canvas. Use techniques such as envelope, negative space, drop lines, standard proportions etc.

    Denis
    A_Time_To_Paint
  • dencal said:
    Alexev
     Many computer graphics programs allow any image to be greatly enlarged and then accurately tiled to print out an A4 mosaic of perhaps sixteen sheets to make a mural.


    Yes, I know how to do that, in fact, that's what I am doing (trying) because, when I try the transfer of that 'mosaic' the union of the pages are 'hard' they dont get well as it were a single page.

    The idea of the proyector is a great one, I tried that too but my proyector is not that good so when I enlarge too much an image, it gets disttorted, out of proportions (My projector is not a pro one)
    dencal
  • Alexev

    When printing the mosaic use an overlap of a few centimetres to improve the edge joins.

    Denis
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