Amazing realism “Chinese artist Leng Jun is the master of hyperrealism”

Comments

  • edited October 6
    Truly amazing realism! And the paintings are better than any photo.
    MichaelD
  • Wow.  Amazing skills and observation.
    MichaelD
  • Practice practice practice. 
    MichaelD
  • Amazing, yes, but I am still not getting the motivation. "Pushing it to the higher level"? A pointillism painting making such great visual impression when viewed from distance - is that not high enough? Or a juicy impasto that teases you with its structure? If he can't do that but can do only hyperrealism then he's not reached the highest level too.
  • CBGCBG -
    edited October 6
    An untouched photograph, lacks all the compositional techniques possible except for framing and maybe depth of focus and overall brightness, such a photograph lacks (to name but a few):

    -local edge control and (de)emphasis
    -local contrast control and (de)emphasis
    -local brightness control and (de)emphasis
    -local saturation control and (de)emphasis
    -local detail control and (de)emphasis 

    Typically painters use these because a work of art contains something significant in it, which is to be emphasized, or to which attention is to be drawn, as well as other things which are not significant or not as significant. That kind of art intends to be more than merely reproduction... which an untouched photo cannot provide.

    One of these is not a portrait, it is an add for knitwear... a painting of a sweater which happens to contain a person... and right now
    I'm not in the market for a sweater.
  • I understand the criticism of hyper-realism.  And the advertisement feel to this particular set of paintings.  
    Leng Jun appears to be pushing his ability to paint with his ability to see.  And I think his comment about pushing himself was referring to painting people, portraits.  
    He has gone far from his native culture and embraced western influences.  It’s not surprising that there is a “capitalist “ feel to his work.  
    There could be a risk here that his successes with his technical skills might trap him into a box and prevent him from becoming the artist he could be.  
    I know of an artist that worked hard at his painting skills with some early success and his art mentor said something along the lines of “you have great skill, now what are you going to do with it?.”  In other words, “What have you got to say and how are you going to contribute to the human conversation?”

    CBGjudith
  • edited October 6
    @CBG very good points! But photography has many technical means and retouching is part of it. Actually, the problem with photographers is that they do not care about the result as much as painters do. Even the best books on photography won't teach you as much on composition and visual design and the most simple books on painting. You will learn about front and backlighting, "the rule of thirds" and that will be it.
  • edited October 6
    He has developed his skill to the highest peak. I hope he continues to do well. Many people love hyper-realism. His paintings are more real than any photo. In his portraits, the texture of skin, for example, is wonderful and superior to anything you could get with a photo.

     He may loosen up as he develops further but I don't think that is a requirement. If he is satisfied with what he is achieving in his current style, then he should stick with it. We don't all have to model ourselves after Monet, Sargent, Cezanne or Freud. 
    MichaelDGTOMoleMan
  • Well this has caused some interesting responses. 

    I love and appreciate conventional (for want of a better word) painterly style artwork as well as realism and hyper realism.

    I also respect and appreciate the level of work and craftsmanship of them.

    Subjective isnt it.

    That old saying springs to mind regarding opinions.

    They are like bum holes…

    we all have them.

     :) 

    tassieguyMarinos_88MoleMan
  • MichaelD said:
    Well this has caused some interesting responses. 

    I love and appreciate conventional (for want of a better word) painterly style artwork as well as realism and hyper realism.

    I also respect and appreciate the level of work and craftsmanship of them.

    Subjective isnt it.

    That old saying springs to mind regarding opinions.

    They are like bum holes…

    we all have them.

     :) 

    and this is a wonderful place to exchange learn and grow from them…. er opinions that is.
    Richard_PMichaelDAbstractionMoleMan
  • Thank god you clarified!!
    MichaelDAbstractionjudith
  • Richard_P said:
    Thank god you clarified!!
    Phewwie, I second that  :)
  • I love this style of painting.  It looks like the people he has so beautifully captured could literally step right out of the frame, off the canvas, and into the real world.  I admire an artist who can capture this amount of detail.  I consider myself a detail oriented person but it doesn't always translate into my art.  I don't think I would ever have the patience or skill to paint like this, though part of me wishes I could.  I guess as a fellow artist I can really appreciate how much work had to go into his amazing pieces.  They are in my eye very beautiful.  
    MichaelDAbstractiontassieguy
  • @A_Time_To_Paint I too appreciate that kind of skill.  I think part of the challenge in doing that kind of realism is technical.  You’ve got to be using brushes capable of accurately laying down the paint.  The other part is just plain old looking at something until you really see and understand the details.  I noticed with his work there are some places where he does this with great skill and others where he doesn’t bother with as much detail.  For example, compare the hand of the girl in the green sweater with the hand of his “Mona Lisa”.

    MichaelDAbstractionMoleMan
  • It is amazing.
    Marco Grassi has me in complete awe. And here it's not just the hyper-realism, but his use of it - blending porcelain with human skin, for example, and evocative imagery.
    MichaelD
  • CBGCBG -
    edited October 7
    Imagine out of focus = loose suggestive brushwork

    As Painted



    PSP Portrait


    PSP Sweater


    Original Art by 

    Leng Jun


    I dunno... maybe I AM in the market for a sweater.  :)
  • edited October 7
    Here's a better view of his hyper-realistic/ surrealistic style. He blows me away. I'm actually pleased he's continuing to adapt his style.
    The porcelain arm is stunning - tiny cracks, etc.

    Years ago I was walking through an art gallery in Perth and suddenly as I entered the next room a naked woman was sitting on a chair. Motionless. I simply could not tell if she was a living work of art or the first hyper-realistic sculpture I had ever seen. I felt awkward. I wanted to know which it was, but busied myself with the paintings on the wall, because I struggled with the idea of studying her as an object. She was either brilliant at keeping still or not real. Eventually my wife and I realised it was sculpture, right down to every tiny pore on her skin, the tiny hairs on her arms. I couldn't pick a fault.
    In terms of art with impact, that was one of two in that gallery that day that I've never forgotten.
    The other that day was to stand before another of John Longstaff's large paintings: Breaking the news. It doesn't seem that stunning online, but standing before it I felt the history, the emotion. I remember wanting to paint because of it, and paint the kinds of objects on the table also. I'm painting a table like that now.
    GTOMichaelDjudith
Sign In or Register to comment.