Do these colours seem off?

Firstly I am by no means bashing this person's abilities as an artist, they are obviously aware of the technicalities in creating a painting.

I was browsing youtube and came across this channel and started watching their videos and their palette choices unsettles me for some reason, I am just going a bit mad or am I just being too picky? I get to the point where I have to stop watching on some. would just like to bounce it off some others.
Which either way they will get a few more clicks and interest in the brushes they sell  :)

https://www.youtube.com/c/pdranitsin/videos

Comments

  • No, it's not just you, @Intothevoid. Those colors unsettle me, too.  :)
  • Intothevoid

    Yep! Too intense. Raw colour that is rarely, if ever, found in nature.
    Artists painting in this style prefer strong, bright colour. The stronger and brighter
    (lots of white), the better.

    Denis
  • @tassieguy @dencal

    Thanks for the sanity check  :)

    The only way I can describe some of the paintings is 'sickly feeling'. I wonder if the use of over intense colours have something to do with the over use of saturation in photos these days?
    If that artist is copying from photos it may explain the over intensity? Or maybe they just like blinding landscapes!
  • I associate that kind of colour use with cheap landscapes sold at open air contexts like outside fuel stations on the grass or something.
    SuezallforChristJerryW
  • I associate that kind of colour use with cheap landscapes sold at open air contexts like outside fuel stations on the grass or something.
    Yes, "cheap" is a good term. But don't forget that all depends on the target audience and on how does the artist position themselves. If they do not claim that that is how the real art should like and the rest is junk ("hey, look at those Corots, they must be painted with manure"), it is fine. If the target audience is those who cannot afford even copies of classics, it is still better than them having blank walls or some abstract art that they (same as most of us) cannot even explain what it depicts. After all, art is making someone feel good, so why not?

    And then there are reasons for bright saturated colors. You may live in some dry region where bright greens do not exist. You may have saturated burning sunsets but that is all you can view as "real". I once had tough time trying to convince someone who has not seen North American fall colors that there is nothing like that in Western Europe. You have to see that in person - the reds, oranges and yellows may hurt! They were still laughing at me even when I shown my own photos. The greens I see in the countryside near Alps are so bright in May - you can do that only with Hansas mixed with phtalos and not with ocre. And then get hit by non-believers! :) Yes, the classic landscapes of the region do not show that but I see that around me (plus, the poor classic artists did not have the synthetic pigments).

    JerryW
  • Probably one of the best artists as this is Erin Hanson.

    But, let's look at one of her paintings where we boosted the saturation:


    Far too much.. now let's look at how it really is:


    See how much more muted it appears now? Even though it we look at it first it looks so colourful. Balance is key, especially not having all the hues at the same chroma level.
    AbstractionJerryW
  • outremer said:
    Yes, "cheap" is a good term. But don't forget that all depends on the target audience and on how does the artist position themselves.
    Agree. For instance, many people make a good living painting sets of colour-themed, arty-looking pleasant works that aren't intended for art shows or making a mark in history - but for interior designers, where the works will very tastefully decorate a display home, an office building, a hotel. They can produce a high number per year and may even paint each series all at once.
    The fuel station stand paintings I refer to - the green or purple sunset over the sea paintings are an extension of this and produced at low cost. Probably by people in third world countries who don't make much per painting. I understand your point that 'colouring' can surprise, but I've been to 75 countries across six continents and I am specifically referring to unrealistic colourings made for colour theme, not intending to copy nature. All valid for the market they select, but they don't appeal to me, I don't take them seriously as art and their price reflects their worth.
    Others make a good living painting for tourists - and choose themes that evoke culture or place or memories. Etc.
    It's all part of the art world and valid.
    JerryW
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