Another still life

Hi all

Here is another still life, there will be a small series like this, all based on the same scene from the Danish Frilandsmuseet.

Thoughts and opinions welcome!

I still need to oil it out when dry.

Objects in Blue, Frilandsmuseet
Oil on Panel
20x40cm


IntothevoidallforChristGTORUESGAtassieguydencalAbstractionMichaelDJan_DtalorpaintsGary_HeathTJLkaustavM

Comments

  • A wonderful painting and nicely technically executed, if I had one little crit it would be the balance of values of the objects, I find the far left object a little too distracting and the pot a little too subdued but of course this could just be the way the photo is taken or could even be my monitor?
    Anyway, just a little observation.
     :) 
    Mio
  • @Intothevoid my chronic problems with photography 😵‍💫🥲
  • I think the values would look fine viewing this in person.  
    Your reflective highlights are excellent.  
    How do you plan to frame this?  
  • Very nice!! I like the color scheme I think it works wonderfuly
  • GTO said:
    I think the values would look fine viewing this in person.  
    Your reflective highlights are excellent.  
    How do you plan to frame this?  
    I'll post a photo in the next week or two. I found one that I think fits very well.
  • I love your work. This is so clean and balanced.
    Mio
  • Agree with the above comments, superb painting. Question: When you say 'oil it out when dry', is that the same as brushing or spraying on a varnish to protect the painting? Also, what type of panel is it, wood, aluminum, etc.? 
    Mio
  • MioMio -
    edited April 29
    whunt said:
    Agree with the above comments, superb painting. Question: When you say 'oil it out when dry', is that the same as brushing or spraying on a varnish to protect the painting? Also, what type of panel is it, wood, aluminum, etc.? 
    Thank you!

    In some spots, the oil sank to the bottom and the painting has an uneven finish. Oiling out (applying a very thin layer of medium) brings the colours to life a bit more. Similar to varnish, but permanent. I do this also between layers in the (relatively uncommon) case where I do more than one layer.

    This is on crafts plywood, is easy to cut to size with an old-fashioned handsaw. I also use MDF.
  • So you can brush on a thin layer of linseed oil for example, is that in place of varnishing or do you do that as well after the oil is dry? 
    Thanks, Bill
  • I do it to revive the colours. Most of the time, I don't put varnish on them.


  • FRAMED AND READY
    CBG
  • @whunt, you wouldn't brush it on. You would rub it in very thinly with a soft cotton cloth. Don't treat it like varnish or you'll end up with an oily mess. It should be so thin it dries very quickly and you can paint over it or varnish over it. It is not a substitute for varnish and won't do the same job as varnish which is applied to protect the oil layers once they are completely dry.
  • edited May 14
    Mio said:
    This is on crafts plywood, is easy to cut to size with an old-fashioned handsaw. I also use MDF.
    You might know this or have different information or it doesn't matter to you - but in my research on conservation, for what it's worth:
    1. Oiling out after painting is not recommended as it will yellow, and unlike varnish can't be removed as once dried (set, really, as part of the paint film) you will remove paint if you try to remove it. Varnishing will accomplish the same thing as oiling out and is removable. Oiling out is best used when you are going to go back in and paint more. (Source, Painting Best Practices - really hard site to reference precisely sorry). They are pretty consistent on oiling out only where you're going to paint over immediately. Blues and whites will particularly pay the price for yellowing.
    2. Neither that plywood or MDF are recommended if you want the painting to last. MDF isn't designed to last, absorbs moisture badly, urea-formaldehyde usually the glue which won't help your painting...
    "Plywood has many issues that makes it less than ideal as a painting support. One of the most important issues is "checking". Checking is thin, long, and relatively straight cracks that form in the paint film, usually in the direction of the plywood grain.
    Checking is not a product defect. Plywood is prone to cracking because of its method of manufacture. Plywood cracks from its expansion and contraction with changing moisture content due to changes in relative humidity and temperature from the environment. Stresses are induced which later show up as cracking. Many small fissures are produced in paint films as a result of the plywood checking. The edges of these cracks may protrude upward and be felt as sharp burrs. Subsequently, the paint may become detached from the edges of the cracks and lead to flaking.
    Checking may be minimized on plywood panels by proper edge sealing, but it will not entirely eliminate this problem from occurring in the future." (George O'Hanlon).
    Mio
  • @Abstraction thanks for this. I am aware of the problem with the panels - not sure what else to use that I can easily cut to the different sizes I use from painting to painting. Copper and alu is a bit tricky. For sure I do not like linen or canvas - the texture drives me nuts. Any suggestions?
  • edited May 14
    I'm the same, every painting is the size I want it to be, so I need to cut to size.
    I use hardboard - called masonite in Australia - it is simple to cut. You can even cut it with a good blade There are no added chemicals, it uses the timber resins to hold it together, although they use an oil for tempering but the heat process means it has no effect for painting. Tempered is best if you can get it - and S2S better as it's smooth on both sides - I can't get that here. Needs to be sealed. If you google MITRA rigid supports and then MITRA grounds and primers - these are guides put together by art conservators - i've found most of their other guides really helpful also. 
    Mio
  • Wonderful painting and colors. I like both the photos. Didn't have a problem in judging the quality of the piece.
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