Spring Melt -Kunanyi - 30" X 36" - OOC

edited November 2 in Post Your Paintings
This is an old, melting snow bank up on the mountain here. The vegetation has been buried in snow and frozen all winter and looks a bit bedraggled but there's some hints of new greenery.  For me, the picture has an edgy,  slightly creepy feel - something to do with the sinuous trunks and stems of the plants and the acid green against the dark shadows and the wan light overall on the landscape. But I quite like that edginess.

Anyway. I got the canvas covered tonight so thought I'd ask for feedback.

Sorry about the crappy phone photo. I'll take a better one outside in sunshine tomorrow. 

All comments/suggestions, critiques gratefully accepted.

Thanks for looking and commenting.  :)

Rob

   
EDIT: I've replaced the original photo taken at night with my phone with a much better pic taken outside in daylight with my proper camera.
BarryCMichaelDAbstractionkaustavMLeo2015CsontvaryArtGalBuckyGary_HeathJerryWPaulB

Comments

  • Beautiful work @tassieguy, there is a good flow to the branches which goes well with the solidity of the rock.

    I also love the harmonious aspect of foliage, snow and rock in the landscape. 

    Wonderful 

     :) 
    Abstraction
  • Oh even better, I can appreciate the colours more now particularly the reddy browns

     :) 
  • Thanks, @MichaelD:)
    Yes, it's a much better photo. I'll delete the other one.  
  • edited November 2
    This is a fantastic series. They absolutely need to be seen together to demonstrate how your eye is capturing an essence of quite different forms, shapes, designs in the set of the same landscape...
    So this one vaguely reminds me of the 1960s-1970s fascination with b&w psychedelic patterns only in the sense that the dimension in your painting is driven by the lines that create movement and pull your eyes over, up, down, across and around the landscape. The only place your eyes don't want to go is out of the painting. And that's gotta be a win.
    And that's so different to the last one where the solidity of the forms dominated the composition.
    The key focal point is the top of that shrub against the sky but juxtaposed against the secondary and completely different texture of the rocks. And then my eyes are pulled into the foreground with that sparsity and splash of colour. Australian colours are so muted and reward you in their subtlety.
    The undulation of the landscape and the vastness stretching away also add to the composition. The lighting variations are nice. I don't know what's left to do, it's just so nice as it is.
    Gary_Heath
  • Trees again! :) What else can I say? All your paintings are brilliant, and superbly detailed.
    Abstraction
  • Thanks, @Abstraction. My worry was that the composition wouldn't work. I'm so glad you think it's ok. I really appreciate your detailed comment.  :)
  • Thanks, @Richard_P. Much appreciated.  :)
  • It is a painting of rugged beauty.
    The shapes of the trees are echoed in the rocks.  I see you have been using a tilted horizon in your recent paintings to ad a mor dynamic feel.
    This photo does not have the creepy feel if the previous one.  You’ve got to be close to completing your works for your annuyshow now.  

  • edited November 2
    Thanks very much, @GTO:)

    Yes, I've been using sloping horizons in an attempt to give an edgy feel.  I've also been looking into dynamic symmetry in an attempt to tie the elements in a composition together harmoniously while still keeping the edgy feel imparted by a sloping horizon. 

    I've got enough paintings now for my annual show, with still about eight weeks left. That's good because a few of the paintings I've done I'm not altogether happy with so the eight weeks remaining will give me a chance to do at least a couple more. 

    I feel its taken about 8 months to find my feet with this new series. I got so used to exploiting the abstract swirls in the seawater that formed the basis of last year's show  that I've had trouble adjusting to not having water as a compositional element in a picture.  I guess snow is a sort of substitute. 

    It continues to be a learning experience. I wish I'd gotten into painting when I as younger. I fear I'm running out of years.  :/ 

    Thanks again for your encouraging comments, GTO.   :)
  • CBGCBG -
    edited November 2
    @tassieguy

    Love this one, and especially the spaces revealing the sky in the main bush.

    My attention is also brought to that nice little bush on left and below center with the wonderful green crown atop a tangled mass of dark grey. 

    From these two places which I love (and from almost all other places), my eye keeps getting drawn to the intense white snowy patch just above and to the left of that green crown. Is that on purpose? 

    It might just be me, but when my eye responds to the invitation and gets there, it complains for having been drawn there... and wanders back to things it is more interested in... but always feels the pull.  It's as if my eyes would rather be led by the snow to the interesting other places, rather than drawn away from those other places to that patch of snow.

    All in all, once again, a great painting as usual!
  • edited November 2
    Thanks very much, @CBG. Much appreciated.  :)

    And, yes, that patch of snow between the bushes is meant to be a focal point. But I didn't want the eye to stall there, which is why those bare branches that have been flattened by the weight of the now melted snow sweep diagonally upwards and point towards the crown of the tree and the big rocks. I was lucky that this is actually what's there and I didn't have to invent much. But because you find it an eye magnet, I'll see if others feel the same and, if so, I'll add some very faint blue shadow on the bright patch of snow to tone it down a bit.  

    Thanks for alerting me to it. This is why I love this place.  :)
    CBG
  • Beautiful painting.  The only thing I noticed that bothered me slightly was the very sharp angle in the snow in the bottom left area.  I wish I could see all of these together in one place.  Its going to be a phenomenal show.  May you be blessed with lots of happy buyers.
  • Thanks very much, @oilpainter1950. I'll look again at that angle in the snow.  I appreciate your taking the time to comment. :)
  • beautiful painting and very interesting composition! gives the impression of the side view of a wave, before crashing :) 
  • Thanks very much, @Anwesha:)

    The 'wave' was the first thing I noticed when I looked at the scene.  It was one reason I decided to paint it. I'm glad you noticed it, too.  :)
    anwesha
  • This is amazing! Things look really sharp and crystal clear!
  • tassieguy said:
    I wish I'd gotten into painting when I as younger. I fear I'm running out of years.  :/
    Now you're into your lawless years you're on the run.
    tassieguy
  • Yes, @Abstraction.  Maybe I should have tossed in the law five years earlier than I did.  Then I wouldn't have had to run so hard to catch up with art before the lights go out and the door clanks shut on me forever. But if I can get another ten years of painting in  I'll still be a happy chap.  :)
  • Stunning Rob, this one’s really vibrant. Looks to me like the vegetation is a bit more simplified/abstract than some of your others? I think that adds to the other-worldly feel of this. Love it. 
    tassieguy
  • Thanks very much, @Roxy. Much appreciated.  :)
  • tassieguy said:
    Thanks very much, @CBG. Much appreciated.  :)

    And, yes, that patch of snow between the bushes is meant to be a focal point. But I didn't want the eye to stall there, which is why those bare branches that have been flattened by the weight of the now melted snow sweep diagonally upwards and point towards the crown of the tree and the big rocks. I was lucky that this is actually what's there and I didn't have to invent much. But because you find it an eye magnet, I'll see if others feel the same and, if so, I'll add some very faint blue shadow on the bright patch of snow to tone it down a bit.  

    Thanks for alerting me to it. This is why I love this place.  :)
    Art is so strange.  Now, because of your discussion with anwesha, I see the wave... and now that I see the wave, that white patch, no longer confuses or irritates my eye...... but instead makes much more sense visually to me!

    So strange... what can I say? 

    So as for adding your faint blue shadow, you might not need it at all, but if you do include it you could also imply your wave a bit by toning down the midpoints of the wave (perhaps subtly making a pattern?) leaving the "crest" alone in it's foamy whiteness... of course you wont want it too obvious but I think a little subliminal hinting would be just fine!


  • Thanks, @CBG.

    I think part of the problem with posting paintings here is that most of us are not professional photographers.  Also much in a painting is lost in the small photos we can post here.

    After reading your first comment I went back and looked at the painting and compared that bright patch of snow in the photo with the same area of the painting. There are actually subtle blue shadows in the painting within that bright area that the camera didn't pick up. The human eye is more sensitive than my camera, even though it was quite an expensive one.  So I don't think I need to add anything to that area. 

    And I wanted the wave to be pretty much subliminal - it's about the snow, bushes and rocks but the wave is there as a sort motif beneath the surface, if that makes sense.

    Thanks for taking the time to look closely at the picture, CBG.  Much appreciated. :)
  • I want to focus on the painting within the painting (top right corner), and my eye is annoyingly (joke) pulled back into the rest of the work.
    I think it is successful.
  • Amazing painting again @tassieguy! I agree with abstraction in that seen together this series will look incredible. 
  • Thanks very much @ArtGal. Much appreciated.  :)
  • BuckyBucky -
    edited November 7
    I was away for a few days, so just seeing this now. This is great @tassieguy Really like the feel of this!
    I can't quite figure out what makes me say this, but is there something about this one that's slightly different in terms of the brushwork? Maybe slightly looser? Or is it just the feel of it? 
    I also agree with anwesha about the active feel of that snowbank. 
    Wish I could see all of these paintings in person! 
  • edited November 7
    Thanks, very much, @Bucky:)   You're right - it is a little looser than some of the others. Also there's more happening - the composition is busier than some of the others which have just a few main masses.

    Thanks again for taking the time to comment. Much appreciated.   :)
  • Great job.  I really like it.  The slope horizon is unsettling and presents a very realistic scenario where the real viewer will also likely feel unsettled, for various reasons, I think you mentioned tree roots...Pity we can't see this painting in the flesh.
  • Thanks, @Gary_Heath.

     I wanted that edgy feel. I'm happy you think it works.

    Thanks for your comments. Greatly appreciated.   :)
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