"One painting a day" - didn't go as planned

edited October 11 in Post Your Paintings
Hey folks,

I've tried to do the "one painting a day" challenge but it was a complete failure :p
DMP members have posted their painting a day challenge paintings, you can check them out:



Excellent work by all of them :)
It's not an easy challenge since there are days u feel super excited about painting and other days u just feel like u wanna spend the day doing nothing.. and the worst feeling is how bad u feel about yourself for not painting.
Meh anyway, I got over the fact that I actually could not paint every day, simply because I was too tired and any time I was attempting to paint feeling like that it would immediately show on my painting.

Lessons learned,
  • If you're tired, negative, careless, or any bad feelings u have, it just shows on the painting.
  • A Painting a day is about getting into a routine of painting as much as you can. I doesn't have to be necessarily painting, it can be any type of media. As long as you're doing something that engages you to think about values, color temperature, and edges you're getting your daily practice.
  • The less you paint/draw, the more difficult it is. Of course like everything practice makes perfect. Simple things like, how much paint to lay on the palette, what kind of surface to paint/draw on, what brushes help you express more of yourself, how to set up a simple subject, and a lot more that you'll only find out if you paint regularly.
  • Color mixing gets easier. It actually does, you're not spending too much time to think what color u need. I got into the habit of thinking of color relationships. Cool and warm. Understanding a bit more about color relationships made me know before I even started what colors I needed to mix.
  • If you can paint from life, please do. A picture is nothing like our own eyes. You can see all the color variations and nothing can reproduce life through our eyes. If you have to paint from a picture, use a screen(wish I knew that earlier), it actually makes a big difference. If I could, I would only paint from life. Prob when I get older i'll walkabout with an easel :p
  • Lastly, at the end of the day, you feel better. You learn how to deal with failures and move on. Failures are something you have to embrace and learn from your mistakes. Don't just get annoyed like me :p. Observe your failure, stare it out and see what your "mistake" was, and learn from it. Sometimes we think we need other people to tell us if something is wrong but the truth is that we already know if something looks right or not. We just don't like the truth :).  That sometimes we paint shit =)
Anyways, I don't wanna tire you out with my long message. If you haven't done it before, I really urge you to do so. I will do the challenge myself again when life gets a bit less stressful and less busy
Here's what I managed to do so far. Most of them are from reference photos from the internet (Unfortunately i don't know the creator of them, they'll not be sold anyway. They end up primed to be re-used for painting). Rest are from life.
Feel free to post whatever u like, even if it's a critique.


FROM REFERENCE IMAGES





The following photos are taken by myself.



PAINTED FROM REAL LIFE




thx for stopping by! :)














IntothevoidArtGalMichaelDGary_HeathdencalGTOAbstraction

Comments

  • edited October 11
    Hey @Marinos_88, dont be too harsh on yourself. It sounds like you actually got a lot from what you did manage to do and there is some good work there.

    Your reflective points/suggestions/advice are spot on and very informative.

    I found when I did it that if you push through and making it as habitual as brushing your teeth it becomes easier. 
    Of course the mind will get in the way and give you every excuse and reason why you cant manage it today. On those days I did find that what I produced I was not always happy with. Other times I was pleased that I got on with it when I had to felt like doing so.
    Its good to remember to have fun with it and enjoy, not make it a chore.
    It can also help you trust yourself that you know more than you give yourself credit for. As you mentioned, we really know when something is not right.

    Thanks for posting this and your links, you will have inspired others.

     :) 
    Marinos_88
  • Hi, @Marinos_88. I agree with @michaelD. There is some good work here. I especially like number 4 and number 15. The grapes in number 4 are great and the mug in number 15 is beautifully painted. The landscapes in numbers 1 and 3 also speak strongly to me.  :)
  • Nos. 1; 8 & 9 appeal to me the most.    I like the illustrative look of 8.
    I love the touch of the bird in 0
    I love the light and shadow on the crops in 1.

    You make me feel tired just looking at what you have done.   My days are so full of late I have had no chance to pick up a brush at all.   Well done, procrastination is so easy, but gets us nowhere.  Hats off to you.
  • Michael, 
    Of course the mind will get in the way and give you every excuse and reason why you cant manage it today. On those days I did find that what I produced I was not always happy with. Other times I was pleased that I got on with it when I had to felt like doing so.
    Its good to remember to have fun with it and enjoy, nvot make it a chore.
    You're absolutely right, I remember taking my self too seriously thinking my paintings look crap. Well it doesn't bother me much anymore, that's part of the learning process. I will remind my self what you said next time, to enjoy it and not make it a chore. True. 

    Rob,
    I would like to further develop the landscapes you mentioned but unfortunately it's not my pictures(wish it was). I cropped them both and the composition/light is really strong. Shame. anyway...Next time I have to take my own pics. 

    @toujours
    Thx
    I too like no8. Its a quick watercolour sketch. 
    I tried to do it from picture on a big canvas but it didn't turn out as nice. I'm thinking the tight frame might be better. 
  • Those are good lessons.  Peter Dreher, a German artist painted the same cylindrical glass every day for about 14 years, 5000 or so paintings.  He did it sort of like a monk / zen thing.  They were each done on 8”x10” and the glass was life size.  The title of the series was Day By Day Good Day.
    they probably only took him an hour to do.
    http://www.artnet.com/artists/peter-dreher/

    That certainly solves the problem of coming up with subject matter. 

  • GTO said:
    Those are good lessons.  Peter Dreher, a German artist painted the same cylindrical glass every day for about 14 years, 5000 or so paintings.  He did it sort of like a monk / zen thing.  They were each done on 8”x10” and the glass was life size.  The title of the series was Day By Day Good Day.
    they probably only took him an hour to do.
    http://www.artnet.com/artists/peter-dreher/

    That certainly solves the problem of coming up with subject matter. 

    I don't know that to think about that.
    I have considered painting clouds over a series of a few weeks, but only to get familiar with them,
    If it were a meditative thing, I can see it would help get you into the mood for painting.  This could help with the main painting you work on for the day; however, one wonders if that extra hour spent just painting the main picture you are working on would achieve just the same results?

    This is one of those things that is going to keep popping into my head for a long time.   I don't know whether to thank or curse you for it (joke!)!!
    GTO
  • I enjoyed every one. Particularly love the eggs - that single point of focus is really impressive, the warm and cool, the sense of the textures... and the understatement of that which is in the periphery. Thanks for your reflections. My last two paintings took six months and a year part time. Current one is a nightmare that has been all year from conception, photoshoot, research, initial painting and technical challenges, more research and... still going. I think after this I need the immediacy of quick sketches like you've done.
  • @GTO
    Peter Dreher, a German artist painted the same cylindrical glass every day for about 14 years, 5000 or so paintings.  He did it sort of like a monk / zen thing.  They were each done on 8”x10” and the glass was life size.  The title of the series was Day By Day Good Day.
    they probably only took him an hour to do.
    Jesus, I can't imagine doing that. I would get bored on my 3rd one probably  :#
    I was reading a book recently "art and fear" by Ted Orland, and I remember him saying how you can work on the same subject /design and produce a large amount of work. Suppose if you find something you really like why not. Thx for the tip!

    Thx! Personally, I couldn't spend that much time doing one piece. I think it's mainly because I like wet on wet, It's also more forgiving. Plus I'm lazy :p. Well, you might be feeling like that but it sure pays off spending some time on a piece. Like the "Main Creek, Baldry's Crossing Circuit Walk, Main Ridge" you've done. The amount of detail is mad.
    But yeah, go for it, the good thing about it is that you don't feel the pressure to finish a piece, or make it work. It's more like practice. By the way, i used cheap artboards, and cut them in half or cut them to the desired size, here:





    Abstractiontassieguy
  • When Rhoads interviewed White, they were talking about life drawing and how it supports plein air, or landscapes.  They mentioned that there was this group of famous artist who met every day very early in the morning and did life drawings or painting, every day, for years.  The went on to be some of the big names we all know today.  Of course, life drawing is not a glass.

    -----------------------------------------------

    This guy has a great video about doing the Bin Chicken every day:



    After watching that, I thought I might paint a picture of Kate every day.  Not that I care about royalty, but I figured there had to be enough pictures of her online to keep it up.  Was I wrong.  Probably there are, but I ran out of pictures I would want to paint in the first few minutes of looking, so maybe a glass, or a self-portraint.  She takes a good photo, but there are so many washed out formless for painting, pictures I didn't want to touch it.  One of my neighbours is I appeared on Ophra once famous, and her partner is also pretty famous.  They both take great photos, but not one between them that is really paintable, without at my level of bad work, my having to invent too much.  I did a shot of one of them that was cropped nose to hairline, and emphasized amazing eyes.  But it came out looking like David Bowie and nobody recognized her, though she lives 100 yards away, and my kid almost lives there.  And in fairness it was a pretty good likeness of the photo.  When I paint from a photo, I try to think of it as a form of still life.  If that makes sense.  It isn't a bad portrait from life, it is what it is as far as the photo is concerned.

    ----------------------------------------------

    Brian the Strada guy, paints 4 paintings a day, rain or shine.  2 in the morning and 2 in the afternoon.

    You may not feel motivated, but his idea is that it's a job and you need to have that kind of discipline.  You don't feel like it?  So what.  Of course if it is purely pleasure...  But then maybe you never achieve the higher level that might be even more gratifying.

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