Optical blending versus Blending Paint

With paints blending a blue paint and a yellow paint gives green, and that blending blue with orange gives grey... green and red also give grey.  This is due to paint interacting with light in both subtractive and additive manners.

Optical blending is more akin to purely additive color.. blue amongst yellow is grey (white if at full intensity), blue amongst orange produces a muted purple lilac, and of course red amogst green gives yellow (the brightness depending on the intensity of the green and red of course).


Are there known techniques for playing with the various products of blending by modulating between optical blending and paint blending right on the canvas?  Has anyone tried optical blending to achieve more vibrancy?  Or to achieve an odd shimmering nonvibrancy (blue and yellow)?


For example maybe I want to create grey... rather than mixing blue and orange I could put blue and yellow next to each other (avoiding mixing some green might be difficult alla prima)?

In another example, if I have an intense orange-red, and an intense blue ... I essentially get grey when actually blended. but next to each other, optical blending should produce a very visible lilac...   arguably extending the "optical" range of my palette...



Just curious about the possibilities here.

Comments

  • What you are describing is the technique used by some of the impressionists. Especially pointillism.

    https://drawpaintacademy.com/pointillism-art-movement/
    dencalCBG
  • @tassieguy

    “I really like this effect but, with a large painting, the pointillist-like technique can be mind numbingly tedious”


    Which must lead you to conclude…..What’s the point.


     =) 
    tassieguyArtGalMarinos_88
  • edited October 2
    @tassieguy I noticed that effect, very striking. Your paintings look like photos until you zoom in and see quite deliberate brushwork that confused me how it creates the effect it does. Really impressive.
    Delacroix created a sensation with this painting the Barque of Dante, with his droplets of water simply created by four colours juxtapositioned creating the 3d illusion of the drop and shadow. Exactly what you're saying. Some suggest this sparked impressionism.
    MichaelD
  • Oh, I'd never seen that painting before, @Abstraction. It's marvelous.

    Yes, I think it's fair to say that Delacroix was a precursor or forerunner of Impressionism. He was very popular with the Australian tonal impressionists.   :)
  • edited October 2
    MichaelD said:
    @tassieguy

    “I really like this effect but, with a large painting, the pointillist-like technique can be mind numbingly tedious”


    Which must lead you to conclude…..What’s the point.


     =) 
    Well, all I know is that there's not much of a point left on my brushes after a few thousand dabs with their points.   :)
    MichaelDMarinos_88Annie
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