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Mini Canvases - What about the weave?

Hi All:


So I was thinking, as a novice, some reasons I do not paint as often as I otherwise would want, include:

1. Not having enough time to devote to a big work I care about

2. Not wanting to waste paint on something I don't care much about

3. Not wanting to waste a canvas on something I don't care about

The problem then is how do I do studies, practice mixing, and practice painting with all those psychological barriers?  


Then I thought, what about mini (I mean really mini) studies.  I could just crank them out and get some practice and not care much about any of them.

1.  They are small and therefore each does not take as long.

2.  They use much less paint, both to mix and to cover, but I would get the same color mixing practice.

3.  Mini canvases are super cheap.

(BTW: My eyes work well for fine work, if I have the right glasses on....) 


https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07SM8K8ZG/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_E60SHVX7QQHZ3KH33A99?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1


My main reservation now, is that the weave, in relation to the scale of each work, seems much too large.


Is there such a thing as a "tight weave" canvas?  Is it available in mini sizes?

Any thoughts or advice would be welcome!


Comments

  • You could also look at oil papers, which have no weave and you could cut into small sizes.
    CBG
  • edited May 12
    What @Richard_P said.

    If you don't have a lot of time to do big works and if don't want to waste paint and canvas on small things you don't care about then you could cut the back and front out of  cornflakes cartons and use them to paint studies on.  No weave to worry about. Or you could apply a couple of extra coats of gesso to your "mini'" canvases to make a smoother surface. Apply enough and there'll be no weave at all to worry about.  Or you could try digital painting where you wouldn't need canvas, paint, medium or brushes. And no cleaning up to do. Where there's a will there's a way.  :)
    CBGDesertsky
  • tassieguy said:
    What @Richard_P said. Or you could apply a couple of extra coats of gesso to your "mini'" canvases to make a smoother surface. Apply enough and there'll be no weave to at all to worry about.  Or you could try digital painting where you wouldn't need canvas, paint or brushes. Where there's a will there's a way.  :)
    Thanks!  BTW I am moving away from digital:  https://forum.drawmixpaint.com/discussion/comment/159617/#Comment_159617
  • You could just spray varnish on an artist grade paper.  That will seal it from the paint and if it turns out to be a keeper it will hold together well.
    CBG
  • edited May 12
    Yep I have been painting on Archers oil paint paper lately, and cheaper paper for practice.

    I put a layer of gesso on then after its dried another layer with a mix of earth coloured acrylic.

    I think many of the finished works are about ready for varnish now.
    CBG
  • Particularly if you are practicing mixing, you can just scrape off the paint when you are done.  That is a done thing.  You can also wipe it off in such a way that it becomes a stain or underpainting for something you want to try.

    You can work small on panels, because they are OK at any size, but particularly when small, they have a fine texture.  There are lot of ways of adding texture to panels if you find them too smooth, though it can be just something to adapt to as many people like them fine as is.

    You can get 1/8" hardboard and a 32 square foot sheet is about 16 dollars even with what materials cost today.  It can be cut into 32 12x12s, though the economy pays off best if you have your own saw.  Art stores sell panels for cheap, and you can easily scrape panels off as they are firm.  The nice thing about cutting one's own is that you can make any size or ratio you like.
    CBG
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