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Thark Ridge 26" X 26" - OOC

edited March 17 in Post Your Paintings
This is the first in my "mountain" series. I got the canvas covered tonight and thought I'd ask for feedback before I finish it. It took a week and there are still some things to do. I'll post a better photo taken outside in daylight when I finish it  tomorrow. 

Comment/suggestions/critique are very welcome. 

Thanks

Rob :)

(Edit: I've replaced the original photo taken at night with my camera. I think this one is better.)




ForgivenessA_Time_To_PaintCBGArtGalLeo2015Allie

Comments

  • @tassieguy

    For me the equal emphasis flattens the image. I knocked the dark 'stripe' of the plane and the hillside done a full tone on the left of the line. The scene seems to be cloud covered. This might created most density in the air. It also minimizes the contrast of the dots which are similar in size and value to the foreground.
    Allie
  • I like it Rob. Interesting composition. And the far mountains with the jagged ridge really add to the overall look. Looking forward to seeing the final product. Btw are all your photos of finished paintings taken outdoors? I’ve seen Mark’s video on it and tried it but I seem to get better results indoors. But I’m just using an iPhone so maybe that has something to do with it. 
  • There is a feel for the expanse of the fore and middle ground. There does seem to be less contrast in this compared to the coastal paintings.  Maybe there was some overcast in the clouds.  I like all the details in the brush and rocks in the foreground.
  • Thanks, @Kingsonfineart, @HondoRW and @GTO, for your comments.

    This is still a WIP and when it's finished it will have more "atmospheric perspective". There was almost complete cloud cover on the day with just the odd partial break and so there were patches of weak sunshine here and there. For example, there is some weak sun on the foreground rocks and on the ridge. However,  the valley between was shaded. I thought it was an interesting effect but I can see that it can create a sense of flatness in a painting. If it doesn't work as it is I might try glazing over the ridge and/or raising the chroma in the foreground rocks which are still unfinished. 

    This was really a practice piece to get a feel for painting distant hills and and wide horizons with rocky foregrounds after a year of painting rocks and water close-up with no horizon. It's only taken a week so far and I'll probably spend another couple of days on it.

    Anyway, I think it gives an idea of the type of mountain landscapes I'll be painting for this new series. I'm looking forward to snow covering all you see here. Not cold enough up there yet.

    I'll post a better photo when I'm done with it.

    Thanks all for the feedback.  :)
  • edited March 17
    Did a bit more and took a photo in sunlight with my camera. It's still not the best. For example, there are some bright patches on the clouds that hardly show up in the this photo even though it was taken under the best conditions with not a bad camera.

    I can't yet decide whether to glaze over the ridge to reduce the contrast there so the dots are not so visible as per @Kingstonfineart's suggestion. Each of those dots represents a boulder or a bush - I followed the photo of the background closely even though I shifted rocks around in the foreground. When I decide and take another photo I'll post the final version.

    Thanks for looking and commenting.  :)

    Rob




    Gary_HeathMichaelDAllie
  • Taking photos of paintings is the worst ☠

    But regardless, it's great work! 
    tassieguy
  • Is this Neo-pointillism? It has got more life than the old pointillist guys! looks like a cross between Van-gogh and Pissaro and your sensibilities. Amazing!
    Gary_Heath
  • edited March 17
    Thanks, @Kaustav

    I wanted to try something different with my brushwork in this next series. But I didn't intentionally set out to make it a pointillist work.  However, I love the post-impressionists like Signac and  Pissarro  and Seurat.

    Gasometers at Clichy

    I saw this painting by Signac at the National Gallery in Melbourne when I was a kid and fell in love with it. This photo does not do it justice but the pointillist technique is evident. I use pointillism where the actual texture of things resembles pointillist technique. The bushes, for example, and the boulder strewn ridge. But you'll notice that I did not use it in the sky because the sky was smooth. So, yeah, I only use it when the actual texture calls for it.

    Thanks for taking the time to comment.   :)
    kaustavM
  • I don’t think you want to lose the points on the ridge.  That’s part of the beauty when viewing this in person; getting close and pulling back, seeing it come into focus.
  • Thanks, @GTO, I think I agree. And you're right, from a distance they don't read as points. It's only when you get closer that you realize they are boulders and bushes. I'll leave it as it is. Thanks again.  :)
  • CBGCBG -
    edited March 17
    @tassieguy


    Have you seen Mark Carder's video about asking "what's more subtle"? 

    If you compare your piece with the reference photo, are there areas which are more subtle in the photo than your painting or vice versa?


    I like this one, although I am not sure what to look at.  What was it about this scene which gripped you and made you want to paint it?  Just curious!

    Are you comfortable posting your reference photo?  :)
  • Looking forward to seeing you do for mountains what you did for water and shoreline🙂. I wasn’t much of a van Gogh fan until I saw some of his work in person. Here’s one I saw in 2019 that I really like a lot. Up close it looks like a bunch of globs of paint but step back and there’s something about it I really like. As you say this photo doesn’t do it justice. 


    tassieguy
  • edited March 17
    Thanks, @CBG.

    It was the shadow over the valley between where I was standing and the distant ridge that gripped me at first. But as I looked and became immersed in the scene before me, it was the sparkling clarity of everything both  close and distant in the summer light and clear mountain air that really grabbed me. Everything sparkled.  It was an overcast day with some areas of thinner cloud that allowed the sun to weakly light the ridge in places and the rocks in the foreground. But nothing was more subtle than anything else. You are meant to be looking at everything. There is no traditional focal point - you know, a path winding through a meadow towards distant misty hills with nicely arranged trees, buildings and figures a la Poussin. The landscape here doesn't look like that so I don't do that sot of thing. 

    I like my paintings to be read both two dimensionally and three dimensionally. Up close, I want a surface like a tapestry. At a distance I want it to read as a believable representation of a real landscape. This, and the limitations of photography, can lead to the appearance of a certain flatness when seen in small photos on the web.

    There is no point in posting the reference photo because it doesn't look anything like the painting. I had to move rocks and hills and I cropped it brutally. When I zoomed in to the part I wanted to paint, all you see in the painting was there in that crop but I slightly rearranged things. I'm not much interested in the exact reproduction in paint of landscape photos but I hope my paintings capture the feel of the places I paint. 

    Thanks for looking and commenting.  :)



    CBGGTO
  • edited March 17
    Cheers, @HondoRW. I'll do my best with the mountain. I hope my vision of it will speak to others.

    I love VVG's paintings. Until you see them up close and in the flesh your don't feel the life in the paint or the vibrancy of the colour.  It's the same with Cézanne.  :)
  • Hi Rob, the foreground rocks and veg looks great -exactly the treatment I thought you’d give them. I think my eye is getting a bit confused with the detail on the mid-distance hill though, competing a bit with the detail in the foreground - possibly a similar response to @KingstonFineArt’s. But I see above you have indicated you might increase the atmospheric perspective. Regardless this is a great start to your new series. What’s the peak in the background?  Best day walk I’ve ever done hands down was to the Eliza plateau/Mt Anne. 
  • edited March 18
    Thanks, @Roxy.

    The mountains in the background are Trestle Mountain and Collins Bonnet which are close to Mt Wellington/Kunanyi and about the same height. 

    This was a practice piece to get me into painting the rocks and mountains in the area. The next one won't have the competing detail. There really was that much detail on that ridge. It's a mass of boulders and bushes which are clearly discernible from where I stood.

    I agree, Mt Anne is something else. There's evidence of glaciation all around it and from certain angles it looks like the Matterhorn. It reminds me a lot of the Southern Alps in NZ. Next time you're down this way we should drive up the mountain now that it's only half an hour away. Quicker than driving from Hobart down to to the farm at Flowerpot.  :)

    Stay well, Roxy.

    Rob
    Roxy
  • Beautiful! I'm always amazed by your brushwork. The time and care it takes to paint like that is so impressive. One thing I often become frustrated about with myself, is reaching a point in a painting where I start losing patience and start taking shortcuts, i.e. blending. It's always an inspiration to see what avoiding that looks like. Great Work! 
  • Thanks very much, @Bucky.

    Yes, I know it's hard to avoid blending. I still fall into the trap now and again.  :)
  • Beautiful @tassieguy! the brushwork is different from before and looks very Monetesque. Looking forward to see other paintings from the new series :)
  • Thanks very much, @ArtGal. Working on the next one now with the benefit of what I learned doing the first one.

     I really appreciate the feedback you guys give.  :)
  • Seems small compared to your last works. New theme! Enjoying it, but looking forward more so to the completed painting and series if it turns into one. Your comment of painting the same seen with snow reminded me of another artist. He has mental health challenges, everyday he walks to his local park and practically paints the same painting everyday, only with different weather. A curator ask if he could display his work. He finally accepted but stated, "but what if someone wanted to know the weather state on a particular day". Took some careful persuasion but the curator managed to get 6 months worth, of decades of images". 
  • edited March 21
    Thank you, @geoffrey_38.

    Yes, it was small for me. It was a practice piece for my next series. The mountain here in Hobart is the theme for my next show. I hope to get some unusual or even startling paintings out of my visits up there. If I paint the same mountain twelve times that's ok. It's a big mountain with lots of different faces. It looks different each time I go there. The light is always changing, as does the colour of the vegetation with the seasons and with snow. This mountain offers plenty of variety.

    And look at Monet. He painted haystacks and Rouen Cathedral and his lily pond dozens of times each. Same with Cezanne and Mont Saint Victoire. 

    I hope your local artist with the health challenges is doing well and continuing to paint every day even if it is the same subject.  :)
  • I like it.  There is nothing clever about this painting in terms of composition, colour or lighting, but it succeeds in taking you there and giving the viewer a poetic feeling, the landscape described aged and mysterious.  Technically, well-executed.  Great stuff.  Keep going.
  • Thanks, @Gary_Heath. I'm glad the feeling of a particular ancient landscape comes across.

    You're right, I didn't think much about composition or lighting - I just painted more or less what was there. In subsequent paintings in the series I'll pay more attention to composition and lighting. I want more of a sense of space. This one is all on the surface because of the fine detail on the ridge as well as in the foreground. The space and distance in the one I'm working on now is clearer.

    Thanks for looking and commenting. Much appreciated.  :)
  • @Tassieguy – I like the mountain series painting. It looks a lot like much of the southwest US.  I too have experimented with compositions without a central focal point – but mine were not as successful as yours. :)  Also, I really admire the foreground level of detail and how you organized it.

    Spacially, the dark horizontal line in the midground of the painting does not read coherently for me because it’s the only dark thing, it is not broken up much, and the more distanced edge is kind of hard rather than soft.

    Only in reading your explanations did I realize it was a cloud covered strip of land. If you are going to continue with this idea, I would like to suggest: making a more gradual transition with the rocks from foreground to darker midground; make the stripy clouded sky more distinct so the viewer can understand that the dark midground is cloud covered; soften the far edge of the dark stripe, and perhaps put a small indistinct dark stripe on part of the closest mountain.  

  • Thanks, @Desertsky.

    Yes, you're right. That section was badly thought out. Even though that's how it looked to me in reality, I should have used artistic license and made the transition from dark to light more gradual across that valley. But it was a good lesson which I am employing in the one I'm doing now. It's the same scene but with more distance between that ridge and the foreground and a dropping off of detail as you travel towards the ridge. Fine detail will only be in the foreground rocks and shrubs. 

    I should have something to post in four or five days. 

    Thanks for your feedback, @Desertsky. Much appreciated.  :)
  • tassieguy said:
    Thank you, @geoffrey_38.

    Yes, it was small for me. It was a practice piece for my next series. The mountain here in Hobart is the theme for my next show. I hope to get some unusual or even startling paintings out of my visits up there. If I paint the same mountain twelve times that's ok. It's a big mountain with lots of different faces. It looks different each time I go there. The light is always changing, as does the colour of the vegetation with the seasons and with snow. This mountain offers plenty of variety.

    And look at Monet. He painted haystacks and Rouen Cathedral and his lily pond dozens of times each. Same with Cezanne and Mont Saint Victoire. 

    I hope your local artist with the health challenges is doing well and continuing to paint every day even if it is the same subject.  :)
    I don't know the artist, was in this documentary from 53:28 till 54:40. Sure they're not fine art but neither was Van Gough's when he was alive.


  • @tassieguy Oh my god, how did you paint it? this is unbelievable. Do you have any website where I can see more of your work
  • edited April 2
    Thank you so much, @vartikasinha. I'm very happy you think it works.

    You can see more of my work at Colville Gallery. Look under "Artists" and you'll find mine are under Robert Brown. Or search here on the forum under @tassieguy.   :)

    Thanks again for your kind words.
    vartikasinha
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