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Shelf with Objects, Frilandsmuseet

MioMio -
edited March 15 in Post Your Paintings
Hi All

Here is another from my Frilandsmuseet series. I made a huge error on the reference photo -- the real shelf is a triangle and I cut the top off. So I decided to make it a rectangular shelf-box when I painted it.

All comments welcome!

Michael






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Comments

  • Great job. I actually like the rectangular shelf better. 
  • HondoRW said:
    Great job. I actually like the rectangular shelf better. 
    Thank you! So do I -- If it's not a right angle, it's a wrong angle.
  • Great. I, too, prefer the rectangular shelf. The objects look uncomfortably squeezed into the triangle.
  • @Mio

    This piece is amazing!  Well done!  Is it life size?


    I am curious, what are your thoughts about setting the field of view (camera angle) used to shoot a reference photo and the anticipated size of your painting, or expected viewing distance?

    I've been toying with the idea of purposefully matching the camera field of view with the anticipated size of the piece and expected viewing distance, but I have yet to test how much of an effect it has on the viewing experience.

    If your piece is life size, standing at the same distance the photo was taken must be breathtaking!
  • @CBG

    Lens choice and rectangle ratio are all you need to accomplish this. Lens choice first. A 50mm to 70mm equivalent. There is little distortion at this focal length. Wider lenses will distort ellipses. Longer lensers will flatten. Set the camera mounted on a tripod at the desired eye level. Newer cameras give the option of 2 by 3 , 3 by 4 or square viewfinder. The RAW file will be in desired ratio. 
    Finish canvas size.
    24 x 36 is 2 x 3 ratio. 30 x 40 or 9 x 12 are both 3 x 4 by ratio. Then scaling to a printable size  in photoshop or affinity. Make print to a scale where you can use the proportional divider tool to scale to canvas. 
  • @CBG

    Lens choice and rectangle ratio are all you need to accomplish this. Lens choice first. A 50mm to 70mm equivalent. There is little distortion at this focal length. Wider lenses will distort ellipses. Longer lensers will flatten. Set the camera mounted on a tripod at the desired eye level. Newer cameras give the option of 2 by 3 , 3 by 4 or square viewfinder. The RAW file will be in desired ratio. 
    Finish canvas size.
    24 x 36 is 2 x 3 ratio. 30 x 40 or 9 x 12 are both 3 x 4 by ratio. Then scaling to a printable size  in photoshop or affinity. Make print to a scale where you can use the proportional divider tool to scale to canvas. 
    All helpful and I definitely need it with photography!

    In this case, all I had at the museum was my old Samsung phone and I had to rely on the auto settings ( lol ). I didn't expect the place to be so inspirational. I am doing one more painting from the museum before trying some new subjects ... then back to it! I have about ten more beauties from there.
  • @CBG Thank you! To be honest, I just used my phone to take pictures in the museum hoping that some of them would turn out well. I didn't think about painting anything from there until afterwards when it turnout out that some of the pictures were really good (or in this case, some of the picture was good). I think the objects here are smaller than life size. I just happened to have an odd shaped piece of wood laying around and it seemed to fit the composition so I used that. I like this one even if it is a series of happy accidents.
  • @Mio

    I'd say your end product is primarily the result of a process of purposeful effort, in which happy accidents have been put to use.  Once again excellent.

    I ask my question about camera angles because I had previously believed smart phone camera wide angle shots were always unworkable.  Upon reflection, it became clear to me that a large angle, as such, is not a problem, as long as the finished work subtends the same large angle in the context of a viewer at the appropriate distance. 

    So, a wide angle shot would look fine and immersive if painted on say a 5 foot wide canvas and viewed from a bit more than 3 feet away, but if the same image is painted on a 16inch wide canvas viewed from 4 feet it would look wonky and not be as engaging with the viewer.  Conversely, if one takes a telephoto shot with a relatively flat feel, a smaller standard sized canvas viewed from medium to greater distance would be more engaging than when painted on an overblown mural-like canvas viewed close up IMHO.  I begin to believe the idea of a painting being a literal window (into the artists world) can sometimes strengthen the impact of representational work, and I think field of view can play a part.
  • @CBG that's interesting, I never thought about it. I always relied on trial and error and built an intuition. I should make a bigger effort with the photography - should make a dedicated effort to learn a bit more. Would make some things easier!
  • I think you did a fantastic job on this.  There are a couple minor tweaks to the ellipses on the two left objects, nothing major.  
    I like the way you did the worn and dusty wood. 
    Have you considered painting directly from life?   You would avoid the distortion of the camera that way.
    Mio
  • GTO said:
    I think you did a fantastic job on this.  There are a couple minor tweaks to the ellipses on the two left objects, nothing major.  
    I like the way you did the worn and dusty wood. 
    Have you considered painting directly from life?   You would avoid the distortion of the camera that way.
    Since the objects are all from the 18th and 19th century (some earlier!) I was ok leaving uneveness in the objects. Or so I tell myself..

    My flat is cramped as it is, I don't really have a spot to set up for live painting 😕  
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