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Need skin texture advice

Sorry for the repost but I wanted to explicitly ask a question. So my reference photo has what I might call halftones on the skin. I don’t believe those are pores, I think it’s just insufficient resolution on the photo. She has perfect skin, and I don’t really see any cool colors. Or am I missing them?

Plus I’m a beginner and I over blended, and so it’s not a bad first attempt but she does come off as a little bit too plastic. How can I make it look more realistic, more natural? Where do the cool tones usually fall on the skin? How can I get a little texture when I don’t really have it on the reference photo?

So I’m not sure what to do next. I like where it’s at but I think I can do better and I think I need some texture and detail but not sure where to go.


Comments

  • It looks very good, you've captured the likeness well. one thing i can see may be soften the hairline a bit? love the necklace :)
    emazcritterisfun
  • CBGCBG -
    edited March 9
    @emaz

    You are on the right track when you talk of overblending... it's the thing that kills texture and interest created from abstraction.

    I note that you are dealing with a not so great reference.  The colors are very monotone and she already looks more plastic than organic... possibly because she has a ton of makeup on which masks the natural variations of reds and peach in natural flesh, and that copper yellow lighting is horrible.

    Looks like,  other than your overblending, the plastic appearance of the result is primarily the fault of the reference you started with.  I think if you start with a good reference, and use only a slightly more abstract brushstroke, blending a wee bit less, you'd get really good results!


    Check out these Mark Carder - Draw Mix Paint videos which discuss texture, and abstract brushwork, and realism (of course many more videos of his also touch on it):












    emaz
  • Hair lines are important for a natural look. 
    Likeness is good. Do some more color checking. The lightest lights are missing. 
    The darker tones don't tell a consistent story in my opinion. 
    Good work 
  • emazemaz -
    edited March 9
    CBG You’ve nailed it completely. Yeah the reference photo was not the best selection. But now that I’m this far in, any ideas on how I can give her a more natural appearance? This is my first painting ever. Especially with portraits do people paint in skin pores for detail? How is that done? And where are the cooler tones normally located on the face?

    I can only go so far to fix a less than stellar reference photo. But what kinds of things might help?

    The other comments were great too, thank you. Yeah I had a little bit of difficulty doing precise color matching despite watching all of Marks videos. Seems to be an art. Very good point about the darker shades not being consistent.

    For a first painting I think I’m pretty happy with it, but I would like to improve it. So the comments are much appreciated.
  • edited March 10
    I would first correct your proportions. As a general rule the edge of the mouth is vertically equal to the pupil, Given she is is a model and slightly off center this rule is a little as cue. If you look closely there are many subtle color and value variants around the corners of the mouth. Your shadows on the forehead are to bright also. But don't be disheveled, have fun with it and learn. While Mark does state to make each painting your masterpiece this advice is fairly advanced. You're the artist, learn from Mark but remember art is all about practice.
    emaz
  • edited March 11
    I would first correct your proportions. As a general rule the edge of the mouth is vertically equal to the pupil, Given she is is a model and slightly off center this rule is a little as cue. If you look closely there are many subtle color and value variants around the corners of the mouth. Your shadows on the forehead are to bright also. But don't be disheveled, have fun with it and learn. While Mark does state to make each painting your masterpiece this advice is fairly advanced. You're the artist, learn from Mark but remember art is all about practice.
    For example: I sat down the other day and did this charcoal and coloured pencil drawing during our resent lockdown. I was using a model as source on my computer screen. 


  • It is very good. The shadows on the nose to be a bit more heavy on the left side. Good job. I tend to have to stop myself from over blending.  I think it's hard not to do that with skin
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