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Anybody up for a challenge?

The image has everything a DrawMixPaint painter should love. Or Hate.

Draw. The ear is a challenge to draw all by itself for most artists. Not only does it turn and fold on itself but some parts are opaque others translucent. This plastic ear has a lot of the qualities that a real one might. Drawing it will be a job. 

Mix. Wow this is subtle to say the least. There are areas of direct light. Transmitted light ( through the translucent bits ). Reflected lights. Then there the color. Lead white white in the wooden supports. Warm umber reflected light from the unseen floor. Even hints of violet from only god knows. A value challenge I'd say.

Paint. A subtle brush hand needed here. Open paint a must. Taking time. Standing back. Stepping in.


What do you think? Am I nuts? Am I seeing to much in this. I'm game if you are.



If you're game I'll make a 15" x 15" 180 dpi jpg available on my drop box.
ForgivenessKellyCanada

Comments

  • Its a good idea @KingstonFineArt.

    I have a very similar ear (I suppose ears are :) )  that is made of siliconeI.
    I would have considered taking up the challenge but having completed a painting a day for 30 days last month I’m not quite up to it.
    Gary_Heath
  • edited January 23
    Does anyone remember Cheech & Chong's "Earache My Eye!" Lol! Also, this is a hungry man's meal! and yeah, it's nuts, and I'm up for it! Crazy good subtleties that should offer quite a healthy challenge, an opportunity to practice & learn something new for me in oil painting. I have the whites needed for this and everything else. I have a 15"x 15" stretched canvas ready to go. Looking forward.

    KingstonFineArtGary_Heathmarieb
  • I think that would make a wonderful painting, @[email protected]. There's great subtlety there.  I'd like to give it a go but don't know when. I'm taking a break at the moment.  :)  
  • edited January 24
    I think the finger print would be the biggest challenge (Joke). I won't try it, but with the theory that all colour is relative I cannot see why it would be harder than anything else to paint. Plus with the various styles of brushwork it is up to the artist to make what that will with the how far they go into detail. You could be as tight as an airbrush or as loose as Sargent in his watercolour's. I did think of doing a quick sketch and faintly adding colour with pencils. I like how the light hits it in the photograph. Makes it look like it has a jaw line.
  • @geoffrey_38
    Workflow is the key thing here. Most folks just go right to the Paint step. Not just on the forum but everywhere. No drawing for sure. I'm not proposing this to have people go off on an individuality trip but to get a glimpse at proven workflow. 

    The DMP technique if most traditional. Mark Carder is a traditional painter. His drawings for instance are very precise.

    We find the composition and tonal shapes in the process of drawing. We transfer this found stuff to the paint surface. Mix our color/values and paint. Compare those color/values to the source material, life or photo. Another chance for change and discovery. Then we paint with confidence in our choices These three steps allow for discovery and forward planning. An efficient workflow. A workflow that ends in confidence.

    This is basically an art school exercise from foundation drawing courses. Sometimes it's good for old hands like mine to do 'exercise'. For others who may not have experienced this labor it might be really helpful.

    To quote our new fearless leader 'Cmon' man' give it a go.


  • edited January 24
    @geoffrey_38
    Workflow is the key thing here. Most folks just go right to the Paint step. Not just on the forum but everywhere. No drawing for sure. I'm not proposing this to have people go off on an individuality trip but to get a glimpse at proven workflow. 

    The DMP technique if most traditional. Mark Carder is a traditional painter. His drawings for instance are very precise.

    We find the composition and tonal shapes in the process of drawing. We transfer this found stuff to the paint surface. Mix our color/values and paint. Compare those color/values to the source material, life or photo. Another chance for change and discovery. Then we paint with confidence in our choices These three steps allow for discovery and forward planning. An efficient workflow. A workflow that ends in confidence.

    This is basically an art school exercise from foundation drawing courses. Sometimes it's good for old hands like mine to do 'exercise'. For others who may not have experienced this labor it might be really helpful.

    To quote our new fearless leader 'Cmon' man' give it a go.


    I attend a face and figure drawing and painting class once a week where we take an historical period artist as a muse (we use a clothed live model). The tutor is a art historian. Just a glimpse of some work below. We do not get lessons just an inspiration and allowed to express as we seem fit. 

    Gaugain: 60 min A2 acrylic



    Cezanne: 90min A2 acrylic


    Matisse: 20min A2 charcoal on newsprint



    No muse just a free for all.


    The model asked me how to paint skin tone. I said that there is no such colour and painted it as colourful as possible. 60min A2 acrylic.



    30 min free for all charcoal on newsprint.


    Pencil on A3, 20 min

    4 hour acrylic on  A4 paper, a lockdown bored afternoon copy from an an internet image.


    My latest DMP still life was inspired by the helmet in this Rembrandt painting:


    KellyCanada
  • edited February 3
    I'm going ahead with a value sketch, charcoal & newsprint 15"x 15" to get started. My ways in the studio are a little awkward 'cause setting up new again and a few things on the go here. So I will manage my way through with patience. I'll finish setting up my canvas with background washes, indicating the broad warm & cool areas, & let this dry overnight. I will also be considering setting up my palette and managing it.
     My schedule is real weird these days 'cause I most often work in the middle of the night and part days, I will manage through no worries.
    KingstonFineArtDustin_Cropsboy
  • Looks 3D printed.  I really like the idea of challenges like this and I enjoy seeing everyone's different take on the subject. 

    However, personally, I "don't have my act together" enough to dive into a challenge just yet.  

    Thanks for offering the challenge and I look forward to seeing the contributions. 
  • edited February 4
    This is quite nicely printed 3d! Even more interesting to have walked through the history and used some of the printers and copiers, since the 60's. I remember when color copiers & printers first came out, some were quite awful lol!, some were so much better but also more expensive. The quite awful ones were great to incorporate into pieces of artwork, in graphic design and in fine arts in the mid 80's. Fallen pieces of billboard posters were a great find on the streets and use in the studio to make art pieces with, lots of fun then! Lazer printed holograms of all sorts became the thing in the mid 80's as well.
     So now we have this 3D stuff! This is amazing. I've been wanting to use one where I live but there is often quite a long waiting line. Many of these 3D printers are very busy these days with the medical community especially at this time.
  • edited February 6
    @Forgiveness
    Mark 
    I bought a 3d printer last fall. I've done 3D illustration and animations since back in the 90s. I use 3d illustration to solve lighting and perspective problems all the time. Now that 3d print is affordable I got into it. I bought a kit PRUSA. I know 3d software. I had to learn some cad. The software is free to use. Wasn't hard but I'm a nerd.
    I did this using Bellus software on my phone. It's free. It costs .99 to export a file. A little post in Strata 3D. and 4 hours on the printer time. 

    Me



    Forgiveness
  • I'll be doing the ear next week using gouache. 
    When I was illustrating W&N made seven values of gray gouache. Now the only seem to make one. I'll limit myself to 5 gray levels.
    Forgiveness
  • @KingstonFineArt I'll give it a go Jim....Is the reference the first image ?
    Forgiveness
  • @marieb
    it up about 6 posts A link to Dropbox. 
    marieb
  • edited February 7
    5 gray levels is very good simplification for this piece as I've discovered for myself. I've been struggling with the proportions. So I was working the 15"x 15" format, my first try at this is not working for me, lol!
     I'll redo this in 14 3/4" x 12" format.
     I'm working in charcoal for this value sketch on newsprint. I'll be posting my progress soon. Lol!
  • edited February 7


    Here is my line drawing, much improvement from my 1st attempt and much easier to arrive at, lol! My camera distorted the left side lol!, it's actually straight. Now I'll fill it in using 5 values.
     Btw, for those who are following this, this is rendered from a different photograph from the one shown above here.

     I'll post my progress later today.
    Dustin_Cropsboy
  • edited February 7


    This is for composition, perspective and values and subtleties in values. This is as far as I wanted to take this charcoal sketch on old newsprint.
     I'm thinking about studying the planes of the ear next and drawing that, same size.

    KingstonFineArtBKW
  • I'll be doing this roughly 8 by 10 with gouache on smooth watercolor paper

    The red and green lines show my method of scaling. The red lines are the symmetry. In this case simple centering. The green lines are measuring points to scale up to size. I usually make my prints half size.

    All measures are relative to the ratio of the rectangle.
    Forgivenessmarieb
  • KingstonFineArt said "All measures are relative to the ratio of the rectangle."
     I was reminded of this in my 1st attempt & failed there, lol! Glad to get it good and so much faster on my 2nd attempt, now progress, lol!
  • @KingstonFineArt Jim, your red and green line method looks like a lot of work !  Do you ever just use a simple grid....just curious. My Daughter cringes when she sees me griddind up, but then she has a wonderful eye and can sight draw. B)  
  • The red lines are simple rectangle divisions based on Dynamic Symmetry to help with position of the subject based on diagonals. The green line help me scale using the proportional divider. It take about 5 minutes to make this in a  photoshop layer. The proportional divider is the key thing. As I paint I can refer to this makers. 

    In this case I'm doing an 8" x 10" painting. I could very easily use the same print out to scale up to a 16" x 20". The rectangles are the same ratio.

    I'm going to do a video on this soon.


    Below is a rendering of dividers that I've made to scale at common  intervals. 4 to 1, 3 to 1, 2.5 to 1, 2 to 1 and a couple of random intervals. Someday I may have these made for sale.
  • @KingstonFineArt,  thanks for reply....I proportional dividers too.....just might throw in a few red lines for good measure  =)
  • Ear start

    Back to earth tone. I painted watercolors in earth tones a lot for about 15 years. In 2013 I started with oils and painting in a primary secondary palette. This is fun. Not transparent watercolor but gouache. I bought a cheap set. I have a lot of W&N but thought I'd give this set a stab. 

    Very Limited palette. White for opacity Burnt Sienna kind of a magic color in some cases. Raw umber lovely when tinted with blue. Ultramarine a versatile blue. Yellow ochre. Hot dog 


    Watercolor paper with a gesso stain to toughen the paper. A quick drawing with ebony pencil. 10 x 8.
    The gesso is a bottle of gesso colored to DMP brown tinted with Ultramarine acrylic. A good base for tinting. A quick spray of Workable Fixative an I'm off the the races. Washing color on first.



    Forgiveness
  • This is looking very good! I'm inspired to try this in watercolor, w&n, I'll give it a try.
  • I'm break-in' out the airbrush on this one.

    Forgiveness

  • The cheap gouache is crap very transparent. Ok when using W&N white for opacity. 
    Forgiveness
  • The W&N titanium white gouache is excellent and lasts for a great many years. This should be interesting. Are you painting freehand, with stencils, or both? It is quite possible to do it entirely freehand.
    Is this an Iwata airbrush? I still have my 3 airbrushes, one Iwata HP-SB & 2x Paasche, one is the VL #1&2, & the Paasche AB Turbo, these are excellent, but no air compressor at this time. I may possibly sell them. The AB Turbo and Iwata airbrushes still look new and work like new, from the early 90's. The Paasche VL#1&2 are from 1980. These 2 Paasche airbrushes are suitable for oil painting as well, no plastic or rubber parts in them.
     When I was last airbrushing in my current place, it would make all the lights in the building blink and go funny with the automatic functions, Lol! so I stopped this activity, Lol! Old household wiring in an older building? Lol! I didn't feel safe in this practice.
  • @Forgiveness
    That Paasche Turbo is worth a bit today. Back in the day I was a stencil airbrush guy. You know I don't know what kind of bush this is I bought this set up just before I left NYC after my my old compressor blew a seal and the oil leaked out. I ve only used it a few timed in 9 years.

    A couple of stencil jobs and a B&W wash on an old mailer 





    ArtGalForgivenessmarieb
  • Yes the AB Turbo is worth a bit today indeed, originally made to order. I new I wanted one in 1980 but no budget for it at that time, @ approx. $400.00 average. I saw one in San Francisco in 1984 @ $299.00 USD again no budget. By 1987-88 I purchased it @ $600.00 CDN, by the early 90's it was selling for $800.00-$899.00 CDN, the left handed ones are much more expensive & less popular. Mine is the right handed model, still looks new and works like new, the handle is unmarked with a beautiful polish, no damage to the chrome finish, many of needles provided remain and I have extra new parts for it including new color cup and needle bearing still in the package, and its original storage box like new. What a beautiful airbrush to work with, I was fascinated by making hair thin lines perfectly even, no stencils necessary, amazing for very detailed work. Ha,ha the turbine it makes it sound quite similar to a dentist's drill, I always got a kick out of that, lol! Great sense of control is had in this airbrush, needle speed, airflow & pressure, and controlled & skilled finger leverage, very powerful, a real beauty to handle & lightweight. I learned how to service it completely and reassemble it no worries, same with my air compressors. I have yet to determine a reasonable selling price for it.
  • @geoffrey_38
    Very nice. Why acrylic? Is it you main medium?
  • @geoffrey_38
    Very nice. Why acrylic? Is it you main medium?
    It is cheap, dries fast, and perfect for study painting. No way in hell I'd use oils on someone else's composition. But thankyou for the challenge. I like acrylics. You can blend, scumble, dry brush, wash. impasto, etc.  So as a painting medium I have found it great to learn techniques and to not care about cost. 
  • Have you ever tried using acrylic as watercolor. Makes for very nice layering.
  • Yes, glazed watery layers in painting above. Especially on the wooden block. However, I don't enjoy water colors or acrylic's used as water color. I tend to use acrylics like oil paint. Painting dark to light, with glazing, and dry brush effects. I have an art teacher whom keeps trying to convince me to paint light to dark, in layers. I find it frustrating as you don't get the image on the canvas quick enough. 
  • I love acrylic but it seems the more opaque the more the color dries off for me. 
    I do like using it as watercolor on absorbent paper. 
    This is one of a series that was painted in that manner from 2002. I do really like acrylic but I have to keep myself focused on oils so much more can be achieved. Some day they may make an acrylic that doesn't dry off color. The Golden flat color doesn't but it's flat.

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