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Limited color palette: my take on it.

This is my theory about extremely limited palette. This is a recent development and I'm not going to follow it anyway as I love colors very much. I love Mark's palette very much which I will use for another painting. However, whoever can handle phthalo blue intelligently, can do any painting with this. 



A_Time_To_PaintJuliannaMayeoliRoxyCsontvaryArtGalSummer

Comments

  • I will definitely check this out.  Thanks for posting.  I have done a few paintings with the same limited palette that Mark recommends using h the paints I already have on hand and have to say that each of those paintings were very enjoyable.  Really could mix just about any color I wanted. I believe I've heard Mark say in one of his YouTube videos that if you're painting landscapes you might want to add a Phalo green shade and there are other colors that you might need to add to his palette for higher chroma colors. 
  • I thought this was fabulous kaustav!!!   Great job.  You're becoming famous, just hope you are ready for it  :-)    You deserve every bit of accolade coming your way.

    kaustavM
  • I will definitely check this out.  Thanks for posting.  I have done a few paintings with the same limited palette that Mark recommends using h the paints I already have on hand and have to say that each of those paintings were very enjoyable.  Really could mix just about any color I wanted. I believe I've heard Mark say in one of his YouTube videos that if you're painting landscapes you might want to add a Phalo green shade and there are other colors that you might need to add to his palette for higher chroma colors. 
    @A_Time_To_Paint The thing here is that it already has high chroma colors. It's a matter of toning them down. Only area which I couldn't figure out was creating a Sap Green type color. But it can be made...I just don't know.
    Mark's palette aims at mixing all natural colors, so that is great theory. Warm cool tinters and warm-cool darks. Choosing Alizarin as mixing red color is also a great idea. using Quinac. Magenta as a mixing red is not a good option as doesn't have any warmth...so cannot produce a bright orange.
    A_Time_To_Paint
  • Julianna said:
    I thought this was fabulous kaustav!!!   Great job.  You're becoming famous, just hope you are ready for it  :-)    You deserve every bit of accolade coming your way.

     :p Just doing my bit to tell everyone that I've got a YouTube channel!  :o
  • Unlike portraits or still lifes, landscapes need a base-line green on the palette to widen the gamut; and a cool-dark like Paynes Gray to balance Burnt Umber's warm-dark.  Nature is much more neutral in chroma and value than we imagine.  I start with a neutral-ish gray of the desired value, then tint it to the correct hue. 
  • edited October 6
    @TedB yes. I use my own two color palettes to suit North Indian conditions and to save time in mixing outside. For most of the year I use a selection of Titanium White, chrome yellow hue, yellow ochre, Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna, Cobalt Blue and Ivory black. Sometimes I use sap green as my go to green. For Monsoon, I use Titanium white, Lemon yellow, yellow ochre, Burnt umber, sap green and Payne's grey/Ivory black (cobalt blue and crimson kept at hand, never used). Above palette can create all of these though but need some toning down. 
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