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Black paint

I do not have access to Geneva paint. I use schmincke Norma professional with Mark Carders medium recipe. Or should I say have everything ready to go but yet to mix the colours. I have the mediums made but one thing that Mark Carder does not mention is how to add medium to black paint. His tutorials where made before he sold a black paint, so would expect people to blend a blue/brown black. So, I have an Ivory black, do I add normal colour medium, or add extra clove oil?

Comments

  • I'm not sure but I think Mark's black is made from UB and BU. If that is so, and if you are using ivory black instead, you should expect it to handle differently/give different results than Mark gets by adding black to a mixture. If you are going to use ivory black I guess you would just use the normal SDM. 
  • I have never used a black paint that I didn't mix myself.  Straight black is such a dead color.  I mix ultramarine blue, burnt umber, and a little alizarin crimson to make a black.  I can adjust it to be warmer or cooler depending on what is needed.  All that being said,  clove oil being added to your black would help keep it from drying out, if you find it dries to fast with the mixed medium.  @dencal will know more than I do about that.
  • Add the SDM for colors a little at a time close it and check on the texture the next day  and adjust if necessary. if it is too runny, let it stand out a few hours and see if it firms up. When I mix the sdm into the paint from the tube I always leave some in the tube.
  • As I remember, it was the burnt umber that required a different ratio of medium than the others due to the fast-drying properties of Umber.  Norma Ivory Black is PBk9 bone char.

  • I would test the ivory black without the clove oil first and see how long it takes to dry. I've found some manufacturers add driers to ivory black as some dry overnight, and others take several days. Once you know, you can add clove oil accordingly.
    geoffrey_38
  • You say that you do not have access to Geneva paints.  Which could mean that you would prefer to use them and Mark's methods if you did.  If so, you should look at his video on why Burnt Umber is an essential color.  He consistently says that the basic set of 5 colors is all you need, except for extreme effects.  

    It will be interesting to see how Mark proceeds with his business.  He might ultimately have enough demand for his paint that he will sell all kinds of paint colors as his paints have a following.  But if he does that, it might muddy his brand of 5 color painting realism, and make it seem less accessible.  But if there is a procession of new colors they are not all going to be ones that one needs to take on board in order to use his method.

    Of course if you are mixing your black for the same reasons Mark now makes it, then there are a lot of good answers so far.
  • TamDeal said:
    You say that you do not have access to Geneva paints.  Which could mean that you would prefer to use them and Mark's methods if you did.  If so, you should look at his video on why Burnt Umber is an essential color.  He consistently says that the basic set of 5 colors is all you need, except for extreme effects.  

    It will be interesting to see how Mark proceeds with his business.  He might ultimately have enough demand for his paint that he will sell all kinds of paint colors as his paints have a following.  But if he does that, it might muddy his brand of 5 color painting realism, and make it seem less accessible.  But if there is a procession of new colors they are not all going to be ones that one needs to take on board in order to use his method.

    Of course if you are mixing your black for the same reasons Mark now makes it, then there are a lot of good answers so far.
    He sells black paint. A mixture of burnt umber and french ultra marine. As they both use different mediums, well same accept for extra clove oil for burnt umber. So as a cost conscious hobbiest it is cheaper to use a black that to constantly mix a black. Which is why I asked. But since my black is ivory I was wondering what the drying time would be for that. 
  • Ivory black is slow drying. Takes forever to dry even without added medium, although from my experience it dries very matte. I've only used the Williamsburg brand for that pigment.

    You can also make black from lots of other colours too not just blue and brown - look up chromatic black mixtures.
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