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Newbie Question: What is the benefit of SDM vs plain linseed oil?

I wonder if I am getting carried away making paint with SDM per the YouTube before even trying oil painting. I do want to do it like the masters. But it also seems like a lot of effort. Plus there is solvent.  I don't really know what I'm doing and am waffling on this.

Comments

  • mhqoil

    Slow Dry Medium:

    = Longer open time on pigments from a few days to a week depending on temperature and humidity.
    = A buttery viscosity, easily modified to manipulate brushstroke.
    = A more elastic, less brittle dried surface quality.
    = Glossier surface, therefore more saturated colour.
    = SDM paint keeps in sealed containers for years without hardening or skinning.
    = Painting sessions spread over several days uses the same palette colours.
    = SDM acts as a paint extender, allowing expensive pigment to go much further.
    = Brushes and workspace easier to clean up with SDM paint.
    = Brushstroke levelling.
    = SDM is a prerequisite for premixing values.
    = SDM cuts down paint gone to waste on the palette.


    Denis 
    mhqoilBOB73JerryW
  • dencal said:
    mhqoil

    Slow Dry Medium:

    = Longer open time on pigments from a few days to a week depending on temperature and humidity.
    = A buttery viscosity, easily modified to manipulate brushstroke.
    = A more elastic, less brittle dried surface quality.
    = Glossier surface, therefore more saturated colour.
    = SDM paint keeps in sealed containers for years without hardening or skinning.
    = Painting sessions spread over several days uses the same palette colours.
    = SDM acts as a paint extender, allowing expensive pigment to go much further.
    = Brushes and workspace easier to clean up with SDM paint.
    = Brushstroke levelling.
    = SDM is a prerequisite for premixing values.
    = SDM cuts down paint gone to waste on the palette.


    Denis 
    Awesome Denis, I'm almost sold. Thanks! What about not being able to throw away the brush dip after a session? It all needs to be disposed of separately. Is that correct? Thanks again!
  • mhqoil

    I keep a small amount of walnut oil and 2% clove as a brush dip (about a cup) in a sealed jar, opened only during a session to immerse brushes. Over the last five years probably changed oil twice, otherwise it is just topped up to a cup quantity and more clove added from time to time.

    Pigment settles in the jar, the clear oil can be decanted to another jar and go ‘round again. No disposal problem with walnut oil as SDM.

    Denis

  • Thanks, I was actually leaning towards walnut oil or safflower oil. At least until I get my own place. It is interesting to know you prefer walnut oil. Apparently it produces a better sheen, so I will probably go with the recipe you suggest.

    Pigment settles in the jar! Even better. Never would have thought.

    Thanks for answering this newbs question!!! Very excited by all this.
  • edited May 9
    The only real advantage of SDM is that, as it's name implies, it slows drying. This is due to the clove oil it contains.  Slow drying paint can be advantageous if you like to blend a lot or if you are a very slow painter and don't want to waste paint by having it dry on the palette. 
    Levelling and luster can be achieved just by using pure walnut oil which dries slower and without the yellowing problems of oils such as linseed. But Mark's paints contain SDM  and so they can be used straight from the tube without having to add medium which can simplfy things for beginners in realism. 
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