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Classical artist or modern artist?

Which style best describes your art? My definition of a "classical artist" is one who follows in the footsteps of the old masters. Someone who spends time studying and copying their work in order to create his or her own work along the same kind of lines. It usually involves painting timeless and traditional subjects such as: still life, portraiture, landscape, figure painting, religious, historical, and, mythological scenes. 
On the other hand, a modern painter is one who isn't much interested in the art of the past, but instead seeks to learn modern methods and styles of painting that reflect modern life and appeal to modern sensibilities in subject, color, and design. Perhaps "commercial artist" might be a better term for this kind of painter. 
Summer

Comments

  • Related to your question is that “Realism” was originally a term applied to artists that painted real life as opposed to classical and mythological works.  I think the first painting it was applied to was of a couple stone cutters.

    Leo2015
  • GTO said:
    Related to your question is that “Realism” was originally a term applied to artists that painted real life as opposed to classical and mythological works.  I think the first painting it was applied to was of a couple stone cutters.

    I think a painter like Ingres combined both rather successfully. 
    Forgiveness
  • I tend to be classical as trained, a bit commercial which I try to stay away from for the most part. And I also find myself more a modern painter in most recent years, especially with the new cameras available including phone cameras which I work with.
     I always return to the classical approach as my root and build up from this. In the environment there seems to be a strong current flowing and a strong pull in the direction of modern art, surrealism and fantasy seem to be favored most where I live. I used to paint as the great surrealists  including dark looking stuff, based on training in realism, and I've recently returned to strictly learn more about realism since 2012 when I began viewing Mark's videos on YT. I find that I have recommitted to realism and everything related that I feel is quite satisfying and choose to remain so for now, but I also like to surprise myself once in a while with something else, maybe. I really like the nuts & bolts, constructions and wisdom including excellence based in the classical approach.
    Leo2015
  • I hear you. I'm not classically trained but I have always liked the old masters. I've read a good number of books dealing with classical art styles such as those by Harold Speed and Joseph Shepherd, among others, but as you know, you can't really learn to pant from books. I mean, you can get a lot of good information from books, but if you want to paint well you have to pick up the brushes and get full of paint. Watching art instruction DVD's have made it possible to learn painting from some of the best artists out there and that's what attracted me to this site. I haven't yet attempted Mark's methods, but I do watch his videos and take notes when he talks on painting methods and styles. 
    Forgivenessmichaelellsworthart
  • There's no meaning in calling someone classical artist unless someone does historic subjects such as Greek, Roman, Egyptian themes. Classical themes are mostly academic in nature. But a lot of classically trained artists went beyond academic methods.
    Forgivenessmichaelellsworthart
  • edited March 13
    Yes @Leo2015 I also agree about the videos available by other great artists.

     @kaustavM said,
     "But a lot of classically trained artists went beyond academic methods."

     I love this statement because it inspired me to surrealism when I was a much younger student in realism and this satisfied me. Sometimes some of us get bored of the fundamentals in realism, like being in a rut.
     But the act of manipulating and distorting realism, the creating of illusions and new contexts, and exaggerating & stretching the truth became very interesting and much fun! and developed into another way to communicate. I like playing on the fine line of what is realism and what is surrealism, I create illusions from this basic point of view. This is similar to what the great early surrealists did in their work, whom I have studied quite well.
     I have not tried my hand in oil paint and surrealism, now it's a good time to try, once in a while.


    kaustavM
  • @Forgiveness yeah now is a good time to to try ... things are getting pretty surreal these days.
    Forgiveness
  • kaustavM said:
    There's no meaning in calling someone classical artist unless someone does historic subjects such as Greek, Roman, Egyptian themes. Classical themes are mostly academic in nature. But a lot of classically trained artists went beyond academic methods.
    I use the term "classical" in a broad sense, meaning any painter who works using traditional methods in painting, and who specialize in traditional subjects such as those I mentioned above. That may not be a proper use of the word, but that's how I've used it here. 
  • I guess still life describe my art.
    I have not done any portraits or landscape, that may change, but I am happy with what I am doing.

    Some of my style has a kind of modern pop to it, and by that I mean the image jumping out, if that makes sense and thats paintings of objects.

    But others, such as the flowers I think have an older style about them, I suppose flowers are timeless.

    I guess I do a mixture.

    Leo2015
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