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Gesso over dry oil paint??

I have a painting I attempted years ago... with really thin layers of oil paint...like dry brush kinda stuff... I'm wondering if I can gesso over it with acrylic gesso? 

Comments

  • PaulBPaulB mod
    It won't adhere.
    BOB73
  • Boo! Haha okay thanks paul. 
  • You could try sanding it back, Jessica. But that would be difficult. I imagine you would need to remove all the oil paint and then apply new gesso. I have no idea how archival it would be, though. Alternatively, you could cover it with white oil paint and paint on top of that when dry. :)
    JessicaArt
  • CJDCJD -
    edited March 9
    I think if you're selling work through a gallery you need to make sure your paintings will all still be in perfect condition at least 30 years for now. Not worth taking risks with materials. If someone buys a painting and there are issues down the road they will complain to the gallery (heard about this happening to someone recently)

    If you decide to paint over it you can just clean it and paint over it with oils. No need to oil out or anything, but depending on the medium used in the original painting adhesion might not be very good and there might be cracking or delamination. Using more medium = higher gloss = poorer adhesion. This is why acrylic and oil grounds are always very matte :)

    There's a great article on the natural pigments site on how to clean paintings if you're gonna try that. Any dirt or dust on the painting now needs to be cleaned off because it can affect adhesion
  • I would save the canvas for practice pieces before doing a main commission.
  • you could paint over the painting with an oil ground but for a commission I agree with @CJD use new materials. 
    JessicaArt
  • SummerSummer -
    edited March 11

    Some good advice here in this thread.  Have you seen this?  http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-591612.html.

    Summer


  • edited March 21
    I like it, from what I can see.

    If you want to have less expensive canvasses try boards of one type or another.  Mona Lisa was painted on planks.

    You can remove the canvas, roll it up in case you change you mind, then re-canvas the frame.  If the surface is smooth one should be able to canvas over the canvas?  Is that a thing?

    Certainly just painting on canvas that is taped on a firm surface is a thing, then you can make up you mind later which paintings to fully mount and frame.
  • I don't think the mare and foal is done and it's been calling to you. Maybe you will sleep easier if you finish it.
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