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COMPLETED - Cinque Terre

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Comments

  • You're going to Austin!!!!   OMG   I do hope you are as fastidious with posting while you are there.  He is so amazing.  I'm watching all of his videos for a second time and have an even greater appreciation for his generosity and talent.  I feel I have a kindred spirit in you as I also love to have many paintings going on at a time.  It is lively and vivacious and brings me much joy.  I hope it also gives you joy and thank you for always keeping us updated with your progress - and you moved the date up!!!!!  YAY!!!!
    PaulBRenoirBOB73edavison
  • Julianna said:
    I do hope you are as fastidious with posting while you are there.
    Yes indeed, I plan on going full Derby while there, and blogging the whole experience.  Mike was smarter and went in Jan/Feb, I'm guessing it's going to be warm in July.
    I feel I have a kindred spirit in you as I also love to have many paintings going on at a time.  It is lively and vivacious and brings me much joy.
    That's how I feel too.  It's impossible to get bored, or stuck when there are many little painting projects to choose between.  I've also been able to learn something on one, and immediately apply it to another.  It's true that they don't all get finished in good time (or at all), but I don't care.  It's fun.
  • Lol taking your rigger brush... That will be a fun holiday. Are you going to do a still life or a portrait?
    It will be fun!  I was thinking neither still life nor portrait, and asking for the Sargent class.  But I really don't know, I think it's rather fluid and determined somewhat by Mark.  I'd welcome feedback on what would be the better choice.
  • This is coming along so beautifully... But I can only image what you see up close and with all that detail.
    How awesome for you to get to study with Mark! I cannot wait to read and see what you share and learn. 
    PaulB
  • Renoir said:
    But I can only image what you see up close and with all that detail.
    Up close, all I see is mistakes and cat hair.
    BOB73Renoiredavison
  • But I'm taking my rigger brush.
    PaulB

    This is no surprise to me. I suspect you carry a couple of rigger brushes in your pyjama pocket.

    Great news about Austin in July.

    Denis



    PaulB
  • Cinque Terre looks tremendous no matter how many windows are missing or how many extra bushes there are. This is going to remain an Epic project on the forum for as long as the forum exists. I'm finding the light green awning/roof surrounded by red umbrellas draws my eye even when I want to look at details on the other side of the painting. I think that would qualify as a distraction. I hope that's only because of the photo.
  • Is the photograph by Gray Malin?
  • Never mind I went back to the beginning and saw Wiken
  • Be careful where you go in Austin, you might be inspired to trade the rigger for a Ruger. Austin would probably be the least likely town in Texas for that to happen. I'm happy you are going to study with Mark and I hear he keeps the studio on the cool side which is good because the last time I was in Austin in August it was 108. At that temperature, walking on asphalt in the parking lot is like walking on freshly chewed bubble bum. Try to find a parking garage, it's worth it.
  • 108F?  That's Phoenix hot.  Luckily I don't think there will be a parking garage or car involved: paint, eat, sleep, repeat.
    BOB73
  • Frankly I'm just shocked that Bob let a perfectly good opportunity pass him by to make a comment about the heat and rigger mortis.. :o
    RenoirPaulBBoudiccaedavison
  • @Richard__P ; I used that one up with the "Rigger with vigor away but watch the spaces between the tricky brickies for rigor mortars" in response to Paul's earlier (rigger w/vigor and brick trick) remark. But thanks for being my "wingman" Richard. A person in Phoenix never gets as metabolically hot as a person in 108-110 in Austin because of the higher humidity from the gulf. Heat indexes over 160 are not uncommon and can be leathal in a relatively short time. If you can't find shelter or shade at  least, you have to eat your weight in jalapenos and chili peppers to survive.
    edavison
  • It’s like watching a construction project. Every time I drive by a new building is up. Looking amazing
    PaulBRenoiredavison
  • Just wait till Mark sees how you paint such detail! 
    I honestly don’t see how you can improve on what you’re doing. 
    A fantastic opportunity for you , though. 
    Can’t wait to hear all about it. 
    marieb
  • Hilary said:
    Just wait till Mark sees how you paint such detail!
    Thank you @Hilary that's kind, but Mark isn't going to see any of that.  I'm hopeless with a large brush, I hate canvas, and I really can't do abstractions.  That's what he'll see.  I'm there to test his teaching abilities.
    Renoir
  • The Sargent class sounds good, you will excel @PaulB
  • So happy for you and damn, I am jealous too!  I want to go back!  When you get there and take a lunch, walk straight down the hill from the studio to the main drag that leads to the capital.  Its about two blocks.  I think its just to the left about a block.  The best hat shop outside of New Orleans (where Meyer the Hatter rules) is right there.
    Oh and by the way, if you take the Sargent course, you can eat that rigger, cuz thats all the good it will do you.
    BOB73PaulB
  • MikeDerby said:
     take a lunch ... best hat shop
    You had me excited for a moment there for a lunch recommendation.  Will definitely check out the surroundings, but let's face it, coffee and sandwiches are top of the list.

    The Rigger will stir the coffee nicely.
    edavisonRenoirBOB73
  • Breathtaking! It is insightful to hear you talk about having to go back and not miss any detail. You almost have to be a project manager for your own painting! 
    PaulB
  • Plan your work and work your plan. If you can do that you can do anything. Right @PaulB ?
    PaulBRenoirmarieb
  • It's starting to look stunning! I can't imagine myself spending over 300 hours on one painting, I just don't have the patience.. :)

    I HOPE you have a proper easel/support system now. No more accidents!
    PaulB
  • Thanks @Renoir.  You're right, this thing has to be managed somewhat because of all the loose ends, missing details, blocked-in sections and wet paint.  But nothing as formal as an actual list.  As with any painting, I will be abandoning it at some point, and probably with a lot of unaddressed problems, but I think that's normal for any work of this type.

    Absolutely @BOB73.  This one required early planning to nail down the drawing and fix a few key elements in place, and later to make sure the buildings and landscape behind the organics are in place so that the latter may overlap the former. At this point though, it's mostly about not getting paint on my arms, and wrapping it all up.

    Thanks @Richard_P, it's getting there.  Think of it instead as 300 hours procrastinating doing something else.  Then again, the man that gave us a frustrating month of spreadsheet progress reports doesn't have patience?  I think not.  There are still plenty of accidents going on here, but none of the painting-to-face impact type.  So that's a plus.
    BOB73
  • This is so beautiful, I imagine walking and suddenly see your painting hung in a gallery.. starting to go closer and closer and get lost in all those details. I'm Italian and I can tell u, u painted the Italian atmosphere on aluminium. 
    PaulB
  • I had patience for 35 hours, but you have had patience for over 10 times as long! :)
    PaulB
  • Bobitaly said:
    This is so beautiful, I imagine walking and suddenly see your painting hung in a gallery.. starting to go closer and closer and get lost in all those details. I'm Italian and I can tell u, u painted the Italian atmosphere on aluminium. 
    Thank you @Bobitaly, that's very kind.  I'm feeling some of that atmosphere, and I want to go down there and have some wine and watch the boats.

    My experience with it is that as you get closer and closer I see more mistakes, and then it falls on me.
  • Looking damn fine @PaulB. Great to hear you are going to Austin. I was there in August a few years ago and damn it was hot, even by Oz standards. Be sure to check out the 'Museum of the Weird' on the main drag. Its a real hoot.
    PaulB
  • Does it have more humidity? I've been in Arizona and in Spain and it's not that humid which helps a lot.

    My experience with it is that as you get closer and closer I see more mistakes, and then it falls on me.
     =) 
    PaulB
  • Austin has much higher humidity than Arizona usually but they have dry spells too.
  • 401 hours, amazing feat it look fantastic enjoy your break @PaulB
    PaulB
  • It looks more and more amazing every time you post this.  The details are incredible but there is artsy abstraction when you zoom in especially on the brickwork.  
    PaulB
  • So beautiful! You must have engineering/architecture background? What a marvelous undertaking.
    PaulB
  • Thanks @alsart, @Wishiwaspainting.

    @Renoir thanks.  Physics and Computer Science.  The exact opposite of art.
    Julianna
  • Wow @PaulB - you are really chugging along now.  It is looking great.  Physics AND computer science - that is exactly like my husband - it is the exact opposite of right brain creative but good Lord, that man can glance at something I'm working on and spot immediately things I would never see.  

    You have the best of both worlds - left brain and you are genius enough to know when to let the right brain speak.  

    PaulB
  • You're a physics guy and you didn't know that robot vampire thingy would throw that panel at you? I'm surprised. You must have studied where they start off physics instruction with Newtonian Law. I knew that easel would dump on you because I went to a school where they start off by teaching you Murphy's Law.
    WishiwaspaintingPaulBJulianna
  • edited February 2
    Looking fabulous, @PaulB . It's really coming together now. This will be a masterpiece!

    BTW, I think I know why your painting falls. You let the wave function collapse. Many worlds seems better to me  - in some it will fall, in others not but there's never any collapse of the wave.  :)
    PaulBJulianna
  • @PaulB, @tassieguy; Quantum Mechanics is theory; Murphy's Law is real. That's why they make paint brushes with long handles, clothes with oil release and shoes with steel toes.
    tassieguymariebPaulB
  • Super progress Paul, it's great!
    PaulB
  • This is a masterpiece
    PaulB
  • What a treasure! In a culture of minimalist icons, to see this painting 'grow' is a joy; from b&w linear to color and depth. I cannot wait to watch your progress when you get into the nitty gritty detail. That's where the miracle will happen!
    PaulB
  • Superb, you mean you have detailed this far without the head gear,...my eyes woke be worn out, I wear my miners lamp almost all the time now, but I do use tiny brushes pretty much constantly 
    PaulB
  • Looks more and more awesome. A joy to watch. 
    PaulB
  • Aiming to cover the canvas by end of February, and spend March to June wearing a magnifier headset and breaking out the small brush
    I'm afraid to ask this, but how big is your small brush?
    It's looking great.
    PaulB
  • Your patience is amazing. It's looking great.
    PaulB
  • I love the water in the first photo!
    PaulB
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