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COMPLETED - Cinque Terre

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Comments

  • So beautiful! You must have engineering/architecture background? What a marvelous undertaking.
    PaulB
  • Thanks @alsart, @Wishiwaspainting.

    @Renoir thanks.  Physics and Computer Science.  The exact opposite of art.
    Julianna
  • Wow @PaulB - you are really chugging along now.  It is looking great.  Physics AND computer science - that is exactly like my husband - it is the exact opposite of right brain creative but good Lord, that man can glance at something I'm working on and spot immediately things I would never see.  

    You have the best of both worlds - left brain and you are genius enough to know when to let the right brain speak.  

    PaulB
  • You're a physics guy and you didn't know that robot vampire thingy would throw that panel at you? I'm surprised. You must have studied where they start off physics instruction with Newtonian Law. I knew that easel would dump on you because I went to a school where they start off by teaching you Murphy's Law.
    WishiwaspaintingPaulBJulianna
  • edited February 2
    Looking fabulous, @PaulB . It's really coming together now. This will be a masterpiece!

    BTW, I think I know why your painting falls. You let the wave function collapse. Many worlds seems better to me  - in some it will fall, in others not but there's never any collapse of the wave.  :)
    PaulBJulianna
  • @PaulB, @tassieguy; Quantum Mechanics is theory; Murphy's Law is real. That's why they make paint brushes with long handles, clothes with oil release and shoes with steel toes.
    tassieguymariebPaulB
  • Super progress Paul, it's great!
    PaulB
  • This is a masterpiece
    PaulB
  • What a treasure! In a culture of minimalist icons, to see this painting 'grow' is a joy; from b&w linear to color and depth. I cannot wait to watch your progress when you get into the nitty gritty detail. That's where the miracle will happen!
    PaulB
  • Superb, you mean you have detailed this far without the head gear,...my eyes woke be worn out, I wear my miners lamp almost all the time now, but I do use tiny brushes pretty much constantly 
    PaulB
  • Looks more and more awesome. A joy to watch. 
    PaulB
  • Aiming to cover the canvas by end of February, and spend March to June wearing a magnifier headset and breaking out the small brush
    I'm afraid to ask this, but how big is your small brush?
    It's looking great.
    PaulB
  • Your patience is amazing. It's looking great.
    PaulB
  • I love the water in the first photo!
    PaulB
  • Riggers seem more durable than normal sable round 00's. Both of mine that size died. Barely any hairs left
    ForgivenessPaulB
  • What an undertaking!

    PaulB
  • @BOB73 - thanks for showing photos of your brushes. I tried trimming a round, but the trimmed hairs curled up and it became useless. I wonder if I should have used a sharp razor or X-acto knife to get a cleaner cut.  
    I bought a 00 round and the brush just splays. Is it more of a light dragging motion you use with such a brush?
    I am contemplating adding individual strands of thread to my painting and I'm not sure how to achieve the effect.
    BOB73PaulB
  • @Renoir, your comment and questions should have been directed to @PaulB. It's his photo of the brushes. riggers or scriptliners are better choices unless you are doing what Paul is doing. He's putting tiny specks of paint here and there. His trimmed down OO round doesn't hold enough paint for NORMAL painting applications LOL.
    PaulB
  • @Renoir it’s definitely a pulling action on the smaller brushes.  The smallest one can only paint a line about two inches long.  For the finest lines, use turpentine to get a real thin paint and apply the stroke in one action.  There is no second stroke, you have to load up the brush again and make a new line.

    For individual thread examples, look at my Boats painting, because I added a few rigging lines with that tiny brush.

    i created the small brush using a sharp knife against my palette, taking off a few bristles at a time until it was small enough.

    Practice first.  You really need to know how the thin paint and brush will behave.  Or let your painting dry and be prepared to wipe off the thin line.
    Renoirmarieb
  • Thank you Paul, that is very helpful. I'll make sure to practice first.

    @BOB73 you know I always thought it was funny how my mom would go through all of our names before she got the right one. Now that I'm a mom, I do that a lot, and even include the pet names!  I'm going to put it down as a 'mom brain' lapse.
    BOB73PaulBmarieb
  • @Renoir, Dad brain lapse too. thank goodness I only have 2 daughters but I sometimes call them by my late wife's name too.
  • Day 130 (484 hours).

    I was hoping to have the panel covered by the end of February, and it came pretty close, but it's getting a bit flddly and it's wet in all the wrong places, so I can't cover all the white at the moment.



    It's another bad photograph, the bottom right is closer to a window and looks blue, the bottom left is too dark, despite sunshine and lighting.  I think the size makes it harder to photograph.

    The harbor looks like it's full of submarines, but what I've done is mark the center lines of all the boats, with the right length, just to place them properly.  Completing the harbor will not happen until the buildings are all detailed, and most of the protein is missing, because I need to add about 290 figures. 

    I have now painted 13 flights of stairs, 68 buildings (12 left), 3 boats (77 left), but lots of details to add to all of those.



    Most of the recently covered panel has no detail, and is just a collage of colored shapes.  Adding texture and details will change the flatness above into the more realistic detailed areas as below.



    Next step: all the details on the buildings, which is really enjoyable.
    SummerRenoir
  • Holy smokes this looks good. When done you could probably turn it into posters and postcards for their tourism trade with the original going to their local museum.
    PaulB
  • If this a bad photograph i can't even imagine how good thus painting is in real life! Good work, keep on pushing through:-)
    PaulB
  • I recently added a polarizing filter to my camera and also put one on the overhead light. It’s still not perfect but it definitely cuts down on the glare. The colors also seem a bit more accurate. 
  • I recently added a polarizing filter to my camera and also put one on the overhead light. It’s still not perfect but it definitely cuts down on the glare. The colors also seem a bit more accurate. 
    Polarizers are great, but they only reduce reflected light (which is automatically polarized) or a polarized source, and they also reduce the overall light level.  While this is not a problem, it can slow the shutter speed enough to make a tripod required.

    I will really only care about a good photograph of this painting when it's complete, and I'll be hauling it outside into the sun.
  • I'll be hauling it outside into the sun.
    Oh god,noooo!
    PaulB
  • Richard_P said:
    I'll be hauling it outside into the sun.
    Oh god,noooo!
    I'll try to be careful.
  • Paul this painting is turning out great! Definitely it's one of my preferred here, it's really a lesson about the DMP method. I envy your constance to not mix up different techniques. 
    PaulB
  • Bobitaly said:
    Paul this painting is turning out great! Definitely it's one of my preferred here, it's really a lesson about the DMP method. I envy your constance to not mix up different techniques. 
    Thanks @Bobitaly.  It's mostly DMP.  I started with (what I thought was) an accurate drawing, and I mix paint the way Mark teaches us, which is going quite well these days, I feel that I waste almost none, and get my colors fairly quickly.  Sometimes I mix strings of color (buildings, trees), but sometimes not (detail work).

    The P part of DMP though, is not strictly followed.  Instead of alla prima, it's more quattrocento sessioni, with tiny brushes and layers, but I am applying what I learned about maintaining abstraction, not blending everything, and trying to do things in single brush strokes instead of several.

    So not strictly DMP, but also not even remotely possible without Mark and DMP.

    Sometimes I think I'm just painting a giant "Where's Waldo?" ("Wally" for the Brits) picture.
    Bobitaly
  • Just phenomenal , I’ve never ever seen anything like this.  A labour of love if ever there was one. 
    Have you any idea where you would like to see it hanging , Paul ? 

    Renoir
  • Is it DMP????   You drew, you mixed you painted.

    Is it novice student strict lessons FOR BEGINNERS of Mark's videos?  NO - nor should it be.  Mark states this over and over again in his videos - he invented a way for beginners to paint and not be afraid and realize they can do it too.  Look at how many people started painting because he freed up their mind and gave them confidence!!!  He states over and over again that it is for the first several paintings - most of his videos are him drawing on the fly, mixing on the fly and even painting from his head!  Is that DMP?  DMP has turned into something of a religion on this forum.  If one isn't sticking to the strict beginner lessons, then it isn't DMP in some way.

    Do you feel you have to explain when asked "is it DMP?" for drawing, mixing, painting a beautiful painting.  You are PAINTING a beautiful painting!!!   this is going to be a masterpiece!

    PaulBRenoir
  • @Julianna I dont know if u are referring to my comment above, I agree with you and it is also for this in my post sometimes I stated "not following strictly the DMP" as a kind of apologise, I even tought I was spamming the forum posting stuff painted using other tecnique in the middle. Sorry to everyone here if  I disguised new members here.

  • Bobitaly said:
    @Julianna I dont know if u are referring to my comment above, I agree with you and it is also for this in my post sometimes I stated "not following strictly the DMP" as a kind of apologise, I even tought I was spamming the forum posting stuff painted using other tecnique in the middle. Sorry to everyone here if  I disguised new members here.

    No @Bobitaly, that was for me, because I explained why it wasn't quite DMP, and @Julianna has a great point, which is that we learn from Mark and then take additional steps.  Is it DMP?  It's realism, and it's a painting, that's all that matters.

    Even if you worship the one true rigger brush.
  • Hilary said:
    Have you any idea where you would like to see it hanging , Paul ? 

    No idea.  It would certainly fix a leak in the garage roof though.

    You have a point though, the paintings are starting to pile up, and I need to start getting rid of them.  I've only gifted one so far.
  • @PaulB I am blown away by this. I could get lost in it for hours. What is so cool is that when I look at the pictures as a whole it looks amazing, but also when you take these up close detail shots (or stand up close I am sure) it maintains it's life in the details. This is just awesome.
    PaulB
  • @Bobitaly    NOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!    I had just finished a rant on another thread about DMP zealots who make people feel uncomfortable or question -  then, I looked at this thread next and saw another reference to "is it DMP method" and kept my rant going.  It has absolutely nothing to do with you!!!!!  Thank you for clarifying @PaulB !  whew    

    Even I have posted some things in the last year apologizing "this isn't strict DMP but..." and then I see the trend (not that it is my place but I find it sad that some amazing artists aren't posting here anymore) 

    After recently watching all of Mark's videos again - it hit me that all these "is it DMP though??" is bunk!  Mark encourages art and is fantastic in his gift for getting non-painters to pick up a paint brush with confidence and realize that they too, can paint.  And then, in time, paint and paint and paint.

    I think that @PaulB is a genius example of Mark's teachings - I could be mistaken, but I believe he is one of many here who first took oil paint to canvas (or aluminum :)) because of Mark's method for beginning and look at him now!!! even half way through this gorgeous painting, he was tempted to change styles a bit - he is finding his own unique style.

    I love for people to paint, to create, to explore - I am very sorry @Bobitaly = I should have been more clear, or possibly, just stopped my rant :).    Or, never started my rant.

    I just have such a desire and love and passion for anyone wanting to paint and to try and to create and give it a go - hell, most of what I do is crap but what a gift to create!!!  

    I love Mark's video when he is painting from his head that beautiful landscape and I think my favorite still life is the feathery plant stems in that vase!!! omg.  For me, that is when he is singing an opera with paint!


    RenoirPaulB
  • No @Julianna it's always good to speak and confront different opinions! I agree with you, we should feel more free to express in all the art forms. Mr Carder is a master and give me a lot of knowledge and the sparkle to handle painting which I believe is kinda of unique in internet, especially for free and without reserve. Feel relieved I didn't cause any trouble :D 
    PaulBJulianna
  • Interesting discussion on "THE" DMP method.  I guess I see DMP as a means of learning how to match value and color to paint something with enough realism so that what you are painting is easily recognizable.  My current hero, Richard Schmid, discusses finding your own style.  He suggests learning the techniques of as many masters as you can.  He sees that as just technical things to learn.  As you master more techniques you will naturally pick and choose those you like.  Finding your own style will require no actual effort to do so.  It will be found in the subject matter you favor, the colors you use and your brush strokes.   Your style will emerge and naturally evolve without you actually having to do anything to find it.  It will find you.  It will emerge as naturally as your own handwriting style emerged and it will be as recognizably yours.  As long as it looks like something others can reasonably easily recognize, it's all DMP.
    PaulB
  • Anyway, back to your painting @PaulB, WOW.  That last close up you posted could be a painting in itself.
    PaulB
  • Looks like we can see the underlying texture of the rustoleum under the paint in the last few photos. Is it smooth enough to make the painting easier, but not too smooth to stop make blending harder to do?
    Julianna
  • @Richard_P yes, there is an adjacent window and the raking light reveals the orthogonal brushstrokes I put there for texture.  It's pretty smooth though, with a few small ridges, which do not inhibit blending.

    This is white exterior household latex primer (Dulux to you) and predates my Rustoleum habit.
    Julianna
  • Oh! Are you sure it's archival??
  • Richard_P said:
    Oh! Are you sure it's archival??
    I really don't have any confirmation that it is or isn't.  It's oil on acrylic on Aluminum, the layers are very thin, and I'll wait 6 months before varnishing, so it's not likely to crack, but I have no idea.  I assume it's not archival.  It is, after all a practice painting, my 4th DMP.

    Most of the new paintings I'm doing are archival, to the best of my understanding.
    Julianna
  • Just a practice painting? Just a practice painting??! It's brilliant!!

    I think if it's exterior household latex then it should be more durable than an inside paint. :)
    PaulB
  • Is latex house paint primer archival: My house is over 40 years old and the original primer is in better condition than the wood that it's painted on. I've seen similar results on houses up to 60 years but before that it was mostly oil based.

    I have a wall where you can hang your sink terror. I think it should be in a public gallery or conspicuous place where many could look at it. I would hang magnifying glasses on strings to the frame so people could be amazed at this work as much as we have.
    PaulBRenoir
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