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Protective Measures for Studio Stuff

SummerSummer -
edited December 2018 in Studio & Supplies
Time to share now that I've used it a few times:


On the aluminum panels made of composite material, I  cover the back and sides with Painter's Mate Green tape that sticks very well.  Less messy to cover than using the Frisket Masking fluid.  The Saran protects the easel.  The Frisket protects the sides while painting and just rubs off easily afterwards.
 
Merry Christmas folks!  Golly, another year! 

Summer
Julianna

Comments

  • First I had to look up what a 'frisket' was.

    I've been thinking about the edges of my panels.  I've been doing nothing, assuming they will be covered by frames, but now I have a floating frame here, I realize I need to do better.  Most of my panels have rough cut edges and Rustoleum showing.  I'm thinking for the sake of floating frames, I need to make the edges black.  But with what, acrylic perhaps?

    As for my easel, I like the newness of it, but being covered in paint is a certain badge of honor, so I've stopped scrubbing it clean every session.
  • I try to keep one of my easels clean for displaying pieces that are being viewed by a collector. I tidy the studio up and put the painting on the “good” easel in the centre of the room- makes it look special. I’m reminded of the scene in Mr Turner where they had the trick of making potential buyers wait in a dark ante-room so their pupils would expand then allow them in to view the paintings in a well lit room and they would be blown away by the light and colour in Turner’s paintings. He was a tricky bugger that Turner lol.
    BOB73Norquist
  • I've painted the edges of panels black with a fluid acrylic paint before and it works well. Never tried it on a ACM panle though..
    PaulB
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2018

    I am now able to seal the back of the panel and the edges completely with one width of the Painters' Mate Green tape per edge. Before, I was removing the primer and paint by scraping the edges of the acm panels with a Japanese, 3" kitchen knife, utility knife for the kitchen, Kershaw brand, stainless steel, model 9900. I only scraped at a right angle, perpendicular, with the flat edge of the blade of the knife even though it has a rounded edge near the tip. So, this is another option if you don't like the tape idea. This knife has a nice fat handle to afford an excellent grip when using it.  I tried to find it on Amazon with no luck.  It's from my old stash.  But I'm sure something similar can be found.  These two options have worked for me on cleaning up the edges and protecting the back of the panels from splashes.  :)


    PaulB
  • Will acrylic adhere permanently to the oil paint? I think I would use oil based enamel flat black from Rustoleum for when edges will be exposed. Scraping and taping seems like a lot of work. Also, I've seen floating frames where the panel is recessed so far the edges can't be seen.
    Summer
  • Folks

    Another way to achieve a disappearing edge to the ACP is to angle cut with an electric panel saw.

    Fix the panel in the floating frame with the now exposed ACP edge facing downward.

    Denis



    SummerPaulB
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2018
    Those panel saws are very expensive and take up a lot of room.  Aren't they built mostly for plywood sheets?  Probably not for acm panels because it would make the edges susceptible to nicks and dings which would be difficult to remove or correct.   My little 3 1/2"x 2 1/2" panels wouldn't stand a chance in such a device, you think?  But I see what your getting at with the inverted angle.  Despite all the drawbacks, If one really wanted an inverted angle, it might be easier to cut with a compound miter saw.  You would have to directly mount it in the floating frame to protect the edges while painting though.   
  • What happens if you use a grinding wheel to cut the panel or smooth the edge? Anyone tried a cutoff disc? Demel?
  • Summer

    The trick is to make a dozen panels @3.5x2.5 at one time with an electric panel saw rigged up with adjustable aluminium guide rails and clamps. A jigsaw or router will work as well, but slower. There are lots of simple setups on YouTube. These videos use thicker sheet metal. ACP much easier to cut.
    Adapt the method in principle.






    Denis





    WishiwaspaintingSummer
  • BOB73

    Cutoff wheels glaze over, heat up quickly and explosively self destruct on aluminium. If you don’t own a full face mask the risk is an eye loss or facial laceration.

    Denis
    BOB73
  • Is it the foam core that makes them glaze. I was thinking of a wiz-disc abrasive wheel for cutting metal and concrete. The harder the material the better they work but I have no idea what happens with compound like foam core or cardboard. Absolutely correct about the dangers of cutting discs, goggle AND face shields required. Brand new wheels explode more readily than ones that have seen a lot of use. I think it is a common manufacturing defect. Also, they don't like to cut curves... user defect. 
  • As far as I have read cutting an ACM panel with a knife is much safer and leaves a cleaner cut/edge than with a saw.
  • When I cut ACM with a knife, with no bending, I tend to get slivers of metal because the knife blade sometimes wanders out of the groove of the previous cut, if only by a fraction of a mm.

    When I cut twice and snap, it mostly comes out clean, but can sometimes leave a jagged edge or raised metal on the reverse, from the bend.

    When I use a saw with a finishing (high tooth count) blade, the results are more consistent, but sometimes jagged.

    The panels I get from the supplier are cut by some magic device that leaves the cut edges cleaner than the natural edge.  There's a better way out there, but I don't know what it is.
    edavison
  • PaulB said:
    When I cut ACM with a knife, with no bending, I tend to get slivers of metal because the knife blade sometimes wanders out of the groove of the previous cut, if only by a fraction of a mm.

    When I cut twice and snap, it mostly comes out clean, but can sometimes leave a jagged edge or raised metal on the reverse, from the bend.

    When I use a saw with a finishing (high tooth count) blade, the results are more consistent, but sometimes jagged.

    The panels I get from the supplier are cut by some magic device that leaves the cut edges cleaner than the natural edge.  There's a better way out there, but I don't know what it is.
    Are you sure they haven't sanded the edges?
  • Richard_P said:
    Are you sure they haven't sanded the edges?
    Perhaps, but the edges don't look abraded.
  • PaullB

    Aluminium and polyethylene are hot formed die extrusion sheets rolled and later combined with wheel cut edges and guillotined into 4x12 sheets as Dibond.



    You our can see the wheel cutters in this still from the video link at 1 min 25 secs and sheet cuts at 1:39.





    Denis

    PaulBWishiwaspainting
  • Thanks @dencal!  That giant stack of panels, all without their corners dinged, looks amazing.  I still don't know what the extruded part is though.  But I see a continuous sheet, much like the way aluminum guttering is made.  Interesting.
  • PaulB

    Yep. Guttering is a cold forming process. Die extrusion can be cold, but usually hot material pushed hydraulically through one or more tapering die to squeeze out a shaped product. Sausage making is extruded minced meat, if a square die instead of a round tube was used we could have four sided sausages that would cook evenly on each face and not roll off the bbq.

    The graphics above only show the secondary process of turning the rolled Aluminum and rolled polyethylene into Dibond.

    Denis

  • PaulB

    I got it wrong. Sorry!

    Al sheets are hot rolled through presses from a cast sheet. Die extrusions are used for more complicated shapes.

    Denis

    PaulB
  • dencal said:

    ... if a square die instead of a round tube was used we could have four sided sausages that would cook evenly on each face and not roll off the bbq.
    What are you waiting for, go patent that.
    dencal
  • dencaldencal -
    edited December 2018
    PaulB

    I’d better get this over with to save BOB73 the trouble.

    Yeah. But as a product will it sizzle or hit a snag ( Aus colloq for sausage)? I’ll hope for the best and fear the wurst.

    Straw poll —- give this post an LOL if you would buy a square sided sausage in preference to a round one, assuming the price and quality met your expectations.

    Denis

    PaulBBoudiccaSummer
  • @dencal, Its been a well enjoyed traditional dish here in Bonnie Scotland for many a year (though not by me as I'm a veggie).
    Square sausage, known as Lorne sausage.


    PaulBdencalSummer
  • So not only have the canny Scotts given the World (among many other things) television, telephones, colour photography, the bicycle, toasters tyres, kaleidoscopes, penicillin but also refrigerators to keep your Lorne sausage fresh  :)
  • MichaelD said:
    So not only have the canny Scotts given the World (among many other things) television, telephones, colour photography, the bicycle, toasters tyres, kaleidoscopes, penicillin but also refrigerators to keep your Lorne sausage fresh  :)
    And deep fried mars bars.. :D
    PaulBMichaelD
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 2018
    Oh God, don't get me started on deep fried ice cream.  I have to cover my eyes and groan a little when we drive past the Mexican restaurant here that makes it! 

    I could get used to square sausages.  Just for the record.
    MichaelDedavison
  • Telephone?  You mean the harmonic telegraph Bell invented in his Boston laboratory.

    Don’t forget Dolly the cloned sheep was Scottish.  Thanks for the kaleidoscopes.
    MichaelD
  • And thanks for the West Highland Terriers.


    PaulBMichaelDedavison
  • ....and highland cattle


    MichaelDSummeredavisonJulianna

  • I prefer sausage in the original wrapping; pig skin. And sausages that don't roll? Where's the fun in that. Credit where credit's due, you forgot @Julianna 's favorite four-letter word; GOLF. But Thanks for the enlightening ACM messages. No matter how you cut 'em you need to keep the bandaids handy until it's hanging on the wall: Murphy's Law.
      Love those Highland cattle, make great subjects for paintings. They look like a cross between English sheep dogs and Texas Longhorn cattle. Can you make sausages out of them?
    SummerJulianna
  • PaulB

    Brief video on the die extrusion process for aluminium profiles.



    Denis

    PaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Thanks @dencal, I love watching that stuff.
    dencal
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