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Bracing Aluminium Panels

PaulB, Summer and all ACP users.

Here is an effective bracing method for panels sent to exhibitions.
Also a good hanging solution.

Some quality double sided tape and cheap channel profile aluminium would work well.



Denis





PaulBSummerEphram

Comments

  • Would a panel like that need bracing if it was in a frame.
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 4
    BOB73 said:
    Would a panel like that need bracing if it was in a frame.
    It would need bracing if it were in a floating frame.  However, in a stiff frame that grabs all four edges, the frame itself should be enough bracing on panels that aren't extremely large.   Because I use floating frames, I am gluing support channels, called trim or c-channels, to the back of the aluminum panel for mounting to the floating frame.  The exception to this would be very very large panels.  They would need both bracing and standard framing imo.  Gotta protect those edges--haha.   

    Summer




    PaulBdencalBOB73
  • That looks good Summer! Is that frame in a kit frame or did you get it framed?
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 4

    Glad you like the looks.  We've made some further improvements to the looks on the back.  We hunted far and wide for a kit of some sort but ended up assembling everything from materials that were available at the hardware store and using online videos as a guide and modifying those to suit our needs.

    I'm so committed to aluminum and floating frames, it was worth the effort.   :)  

    Summer
    dencalPaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    @Summer, I'm copying your C-channel frame support for a floating frame I have sitting around that I'm puzzling over.  Looks like a good idea.
    Summer
  • Summer said:

    Glad you like the looks.  We've made some further improvements to the looks on the back.  We hunted far and wide for a kit of some sort but ended up assembling everything from materials that were available at the hardware store and using online videos as a guide and modifying those to suit our needs.

    I'm so committed to aluminum and floating frames, it was worth the effort.   :)  

    Summer
    Ah I'm jealous.. I have no practical skills for doing anything like that. Make the most of both of your skill sets. :)
    Summer
  • Should mention that the floater frame in the example above has a 1/8" floater.  To me it seems the most aesthetically pleasing.

    @Richard_p ; I don't know about skill set, but we sure do a lot of fumbling around trying out different ideas.  Some results seem even crude.  The thing I like the most is that we work well together and we like trying out each others ideas.  It's fun and keeps us doing things together.   :)     
  • Folks

    Here is a less elegant version using angle aluminium.
    Larson estimates the all up costs for braced aluminium at 70% of the same sized stretched linen canvas.

    https://www.bryanlarsen.com/building-and-preparing-and-aluminum-composite-panel-for-oil-painting/

    Denis

    SummerBOB73
  • Folks

    Here is a kit form bracing and framing in aluminium for canvas, but could be used for ACP.

    https://www.parkersartsupplies.com/canvas-stretchers/stretchers/museo-aluminium-stretchers.html

    Denis

    SummerBOB73
  • Folks

    This profile with a few mitre cuts and some glue would provide bracing, framing, edge & corner protection and a “T” slot for hanging suspension.



    Denis

    Summer
  • The aluminum frames look like excellent systems for very large works.  Strong, stable and lightweight.  For my smaller panels so far (up to 16 x 20) I've just epoxied a 1/2" plywood to the back offset by about  1/2" from the sides.  The sides are painted black to give it a floating look.  Then I epoxy a French cleat near the top to hang it (BigTeddy 4" cleat that I get from Amazon).  One or two 2" x 1"  pieces of wood, the same thickness as the cleat are also glued to the bottom to make sure it stays perfectly vertical.  For smaller works this is super easy, requires minimal woodworking skills and is relatively cheap.  1/2" plywood does add 1.4 lbs per square foot according to Mr. Google.




    dencal
  • dencaldencal -
    edited December 8
    Wishiwaspainting

    Good craftsman solution. Excellent on the wall.

    It looks like the plywood is primed. If not the wood will sponge up humidity and bow the whole shebang.

    Denis

    BOB73
  • edited December 8
    @dencal ; You are correct.  The plywood was primed.  

    Also, if I was to do this with a large painting I would use more than one cleat for balance.  Each cleat can hold up to 50 lbs.
  • For These smaller ones, wouldn't a sawtooth hanger work? I would epoxy the hanger to the wood. Good insight about priming the plywood backing. Both sides and edges should be primed.
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Every exhibition I've been in has mandated a frame and a wire hanger.
    BOB73
  • @BOB73 ; A sawtooth hanger would work fine.  The plywood on the back of the smaller paintings is primarily to offset it from the wall i.e. a floating mount.  It's a purely aesthetic thing.  It is the larger works that need the support.
  • SummerSummer -
    edited December 9
    Years ago, I recall not getting into an exhibition even with a hanging device already attached because the edges were too sharp and dangerous--I was told.  I painted with oils on plexiglass and glued a two-part hanging device to the back with Epoxy or some such glue.  They said they couldn't guarantee the safety of the painting or the workers hanging the exhibition.  Probably why I am over cautious now.  Hmm.
  • I've been injured a number of times with the ends of those twisted wire hangers but not any other hanging device. I hate it when the wire punctures my skin just under the finger nail.
  • BOB73 said:
    I've been injured a number of times with the ends of those twisted wire hangers but not any other hanging device. I hate it when the wire punctures my skin just under the finger nail.
    What the heck were you doing? :open_mouth:
  • Mounting frames for my wife's needle works shop. The steel, 7-strand wire is on a spool and when you thread it through the screw eyes, it bites you repeatedly until you've twisted it around the hanger length I also found out that "Acid-Free" glass breaks easier than regular window pane (pain in the glass) glass.
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    PaulB said:
    @Summer, I'm copying your C-channel frame support for a floating frame I have sitting around that I'm puzzling over.  Looks like a good idea.
    So I ordered some aluminum C-channel.  It arrived in a 9 foot (2.7m) cardboard tube.  Think about that for a moment.

    I'll bet the mailperson is still swearing at me.
    SummerDianna
  • Careful, you'll probably drop it on your foot knowing your luck.. ;)
    PaulBSummerBOB73
  • dencaldencal -
    edited 3:47AM
    Summer

    Some time back you mentioned a fruitless search for kit frames.

    Here is an outfit that has a fun “design it yourself” webpage and supplies the whole kit and kaboodle for a reasonable price. Huge range of options. upload your digital image to see what it looks like in a frame.

    https://www.frameiteasy.com/

    Denis

  • Thanks, Denis, I've bookmarked the site.  Should be interesting. 
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