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waste disposal

i havent seen a discussion on disposing of the paper towels, rags, etc to prevent fire.  I live where I can’t put them outside to dry out.

Comments

  • BOB73BOB73 -
    edited November 8
    Keep them in a metal can with a metal cover until trash pick up day. paper towels and vegetable oils  are not so likely to self combust as animal oils and cotton rags for which the recommendation/ordinance was first made. But self combustion is still possible over time. There is more the danger of fire from a spark, heat from a lamp or space heater and fugitive lit cigarettes. Alternatively but messier is to dunk the paper towels in water until trash day.
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited November 8
    @frannie04 ; What @BOB73 has just written is spot on.  This is from one of my old posts:  I purchased a small galvanized steel can with a locking wire handle and at the end of each working day, I wrap volatile items in aluminum foil, compressing all the air out.  Without oxygen, they can't ignite.  Then I toss the "cow pie" into the can and lock it with the wire handle.  I empty the can with the normal trash pickup after that several times a week.  Our trash service recycles these items.  I'll include a picture of a similar can here.  They are not hard to find and are sold on Amazon as well.  They come in 4- 5- and 6-gallon sizes.  I just have to add that I had to take a pliers and reconfigure the wire part to get it to snap into place correctly.  Summer 


  • edited November 8
    I soak mine in water, place these in a plastic bag, compress and seal it tight, throw it in the freezer until garbage pick-up day. I most often reuse the bag until completely full.
  • SummerSummer -
    edited November 9
    @BOB73 ; Speaking of fire cans, maybe you can add your expertise to something.  Years ago I was looking for a conversation piece for my garden and I came across a shop fire can that itself had been in a fire and was now rusted beyond use but was just what I was looking for.  What is your experience when one of these burns up in a fire?  Here is an image of a brand new one.  How protective are these cans?  Summer




  • This is a typical oily waste can which can now-a-days be metal or polyethylene plastic. Its only difference to yours (and mine) is that it can be opened by a foot lever AND it is self-closing by means of a spring. Oh and thanks to OSHA it only opens half way. Their reasoning (this is true BION) is that if there is already a fire inside it will only flare up and set your pants on fire but not singe your eyebrows. OK I had to paraphrase to avoid writing 6 paragraphs. I used to do this for a living (read 6 paragraphs of a regulation and reduce it to one or two sentences for clarity. I was a safety consultant. Too bad I can't seem to do the same for normal conversation.
    Summer
  • Thanks for your informative reply.  I suspect that the fire began from the inside of the can and then set the whole room ablaze because of the condition of the outside of the can.  I empty my current can several times a week and hope this never happens to me!
  • OK, I missed part of the question. My experience when they are alit... I've never known one to cause a fire but the ones that have been in fires from within the room were rendered useless. We did some experiments with numerous materials to see if we could make something self combust. The closest we came was with a worn dishcloth with silver polish on it also part of that same rag with bacon grease. both caused a minor charring effect after 3 weeks. We expect that had there been a longer duration there might have been more charring. On the other hand, I've seen several instances where greasy or oily rags have self combusted in the kitchen cabinets under the sink where cleaning supplies are kept in many households. What's under your sink?
  • How many house fires have been started by artists????
  • @BOB73 ; Thanks for the tips.  No used rags under our sinks, in our cupboards, or in our work areas like my studio, utility room, or the garage.  Sure a lot to think about to keep safe though. 
  • BOB73BOB73 -
    edited November 9
    @alsart, all of them. sorry I thought you said arsonists. Records of accidental fires don't usually include occupational information. Records on Arsonist's include almost every occupational category including clergy, physicians and even firefighters. People are more than one thing. 
    Summer
  • @BOB73 I guess my point is in a nanny state we are told to do this and that, and lots of people follow that advice,...instead of plain old common sense and assessing the actual risk but better safe than sorry - I just throw it all in my bin under the sink and in the garbage shoot / no thought and little risk. 
  • If everybody used common sense we wouldn't need regulations but the nanny state, oh don't get me started.
    Summeralsart
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