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A herring for Summer 6x8 alla prima

edited September 23 in Post Your Paintings
A 6x8 study of a small herring requested by Summer. I think it turned out well, though i would like to rework some of the highlights. I think they are a bit too flat and smooth. Might go back in and practice dry brush and see if i can push them a little bit more. When its dry enough and after varnishing I will try and take a professional photo of it to use for prints. Looking for any critiques as always thanks.
anweshaSummerBobitalyBOB73FlattyKaustavtassieguyRonnaRoxyJuliannajeff

Comments

  • What a nice surprise @waltwalt.  I just finished a double serving less than a half hour ago--me and the dog.  I think it looks perfect the way it is but I understand your need to see how far you can push your ideas for it.  A good photograph and prints are good ideas as well.  A TIFF image will preserve your image from degrading in the future if copies are needed.  You are on a roll!  Summer
  • good work again on the fish. I think the brushwork on the background follows the outline of the fish too closely but everything else is great. 
  • Thank you Summer and Bob. I see what you mean about the brush strokes. will change those up tomorrow
  • does clove oil help with the fish smell in the studio

  • Superb! You see value and colour very well and you sure know how to push paint around.  :)
  • edited September 24
    Thank you guys! though i love the smell of clove oil I dont use it currently. I usually just leave windows open and a fan on when i have a fish in studio. Heres updated pictures from second day of painting . My goal for this painting was to see how much color and thick paint i could get away with while still having a quality of realism.
  • @waltwalt ; Beautiful!  I like what you have done with it--the changes.  I think it is perfect and done!  Summer
  • Maybe soften the black shadow line on the underside of the fish?
  • Thank you summer! So glad you like it. Richard, do you mean where the shadow meets the fish or where it meets the table?
  • The pectoral fin is better in your painting than life. 
  • Where it meets the fish.
  • edited September 24
    Thanks for suggestion Richard, will think on it. I made it hard because it looked that way and the fish body was so thin there it was almost like a leaf. And thank you Bob!
  • @waltwalt ; Looking forward to hearing from you when the prints are available for purchase for the 6 x 8 study of a small herring.  No hurry.  :)  Summer
  • @Summer Hopefully soon, I may oil it out and do my photos for it though right now I'm reading up on how to take a professional picture of it from Mark's guide. Will be sure to let you know when ready
  • waltwalt said:
    @Summer Hopefully soon, I may oil it out and do my photos for it though right now I'm reading up on how to take a professional picture of it from Mark's guide. Will be sure to let you know when ready
    Okay!  Great!

    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited October 1

    Just thought I'd mention that even though a good photo can be gotten, I'm not a fan of oiling out to take a professional looking photograph because it adds another layer of oil that will darken the painting prematurely--even if you wipe it off afterwards.  It's impossible to get all of that layer of oil out of the cracks and crevices of the brush strokes so when the varnish is applied months later, it becomes permanent.  The painting will look like it needs to be cleaned and varnish replaced a lot sooner in the future and even then, the results will not be optimal because the cleaning cannot remove all of the oil that was used in the oiling out stage.  I think it does permanent damage in this respect even though I know a lot of people do it.  The exception for oiling out is when we are oiling out a section of a painting that we are going to paint over that day.  If you need to oil out to take the photograph it is fine with me because the upside is that it will look good no matter what it's age appears to be.  As it darkens, it will appear more and more like an antique.  I guess this topic is controversial.  Hmm.

    Summer 
  • edited October 1
    Thanks for the input Summer, will take that into consideration. What do you think about retouch varnish? I asked the artist Marc Dalessio how he gets his paintings into gallery shows so quickly after painting and he says he uses it, though I dont understand too much about it.
  • I think this is awesome!  Your brushwork really captures the scales.  Thank you for sharing.
  • waltwalt said:
    I asked the artist Marc Dalessio how he gets his paintings into gallery shows so quickly after painting and he says he uses it, though I dont understand too much about it.
    Retouch varnish is regular varnish with a lot more solvent.  This means you can spread it thinner, and it dries leaving a shine, and is also breathable, meaning that it lets oxygen through, to allow the paint beneath to cure over the next 6 months.

    Wait until the paint is touch-dry, which means you cannot push your fingernail into it, before applying the thinnest possible coat of retouch varnish.
  • waltwalt said:
    What do you think about retouch varnish? I asked the artist Marc Dalessio how he gets his paintings into gallery shows so quickly after painting and he says he uses it, though I dont understand too much about it.
    I think it is another controversial topic.  Many artists and patrons alike don't care if a painting is archival or not.  The conservators say they cannot clean a painting if varnish is mixed in with the paint and this is what retouch varnish does.  Archival means that a varnish has to be put on in layers so it can be removed in layers for cleaning and that can only be done if the painting is dry when the varnish was applied.  The painting does not have to be thoroughly dry to use retouch varnish.  Retouch varnish protects the painting as it is drying because it can continue drying through the layer of retouch varnish therefore paintings can be sold much earlier than ones that had non-permanent  varnish applied.  It depends on how long you would like your paintings to last and whether you are going to clean them or have them cleaned in the future.  I think it affects price as well.  I would not pay a lot of money for a painting where retouch varnish was used.  So, what type of varnish is used depends on asking price, objectives you have for your work, and under what conditions your paintings will be displayed.  I think this is the gist of it, anyway. 

    Summer 
  • Thanks Julianna! And thanks Paul and Summer. I think I may just wait the 6 months to do a final varnish with gamvar.
  • From the Gamblin website
    I varnish with this once my paintings are touch dry. I definitely don’t wait 6 months.

    Gamvar Picture Varnish

    GAMVAR | The perfect picture varnish.™

    Gamvar Picture Varnish saturates colors in your painting and gives your work a unified and protective surface. Developed in collaboration with the National Gallery of Art, Gamvar goes on water-clear, stays water-clear and can be easily and safely removed with Gamsol. Gamvar is virtually odorless and ready to apply. Brush apply. Do not spray. All Gamvar can be applied when the thickest areas of your painting are thoroughly dry and firm to the touch.


  • That is really nice. I want it.
  • Thank you @Mio ! Ill be doing some prints of it in the future after varnishing if you are interested.
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