Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

You can send an email to [email protected] if you have questions about how to use this forum.

Voting has opened!

A special someone from the forum has a lovely painting in the mix.  I just voted for his beautiful painting.  His is just as good or better than all the rest in my opinion.  He could win some cool prizes (he does not know that I am soliciting for him) :)

https://michaeljamessmith.com/mjs-oil-painting-awards/?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=61722
PaulBSummer

Comments

  • Voted, it was good to see all of the different approaches to the same subject. Thanks for bring this to our attention. Interesting
  • Oh, @Julianna, that's kind.  But I must say, there are many better paintings there.  By all means vote, but not for that one.

    You might consider an entry by our own @mchewett, another example of a much better painting:

    https://michaeljamessmith.com/mjs-oil-painting-awards/?contest=photo-detail&photo_id=62278
  • I think your is up there with the best, @PaulB. I haven't looked through then all but to me yours looks comfortable among the top 10 I did look at. :)
  • Wow! You're quite the student! Mark then MJS! Way to go Paul and your painting IS among the best! Did you like the class? Seems like a totally diff painting style from mark. Both with grand results! Which do you favor? Certainly you get to use your rigger with MJS! Haha 
  • Did you like the class? Seems like a totally diff painting style from mark. Both with grand results! Which do you favor? Certainly you get to use your rigger with MJS! Haha 
    Good question.

    This boils down to two different approaches.  DMP is alla prima, the other three-layered (block-in, texture, detail).  For realism, both focus on values.  Having painted in both ways, I prefer alla prima and think it's faster, but there are definitely times when the layered, detailed approach works well.  For example, here is a public teaser video, featuring some kind of large animal you might appreciate, painted in layers:



    Both approaches have abstractions.  I tend to do a bit of both, and there is definitely room for a rigger brush in alla prima, just not for the whole painting, it just isn't worth the time.

    But it's more than two styles. I have been enjoying long-format videos from a lot of artists.  The ones I enjoy most are Richard Schmidt, Andrew Tischler and Mark Boedges.  If you haven't seen Mark Boedges paint, particularly the "Mountain Lake", which is 7 hours of almost non-stop talk and painting, part plein air, part studio work, you're missing out.  Listening to his discussion of composition and color is fascinating.

    I love the way Schmidt paints only what is necessary, not to mention he seems like a guy you'd like to have a beer with.  I love the way Tischler is self-critical and fixes composition mistakes on the fly, and is focused on getting it right.
  • Wow cool! I will check out those artists/vids thanks for the info!
Sign In or Register to comment.