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#3 Challenge...No Blending Piece of Work...May 1-June 1

edited May 2013 in General Discussion
Shirley Seput came up with the great idea of our #3 challenge!
Under Mark's advise...absolutely NO blending...:-)

The challenge will start on May 1st...and end June 1st....any subject matter, size etc...just no blending!

Myself...I'm really excited to try this because I'm a "big time" blender....so this will truly be a challenge..fun, fun, fun!

Who's interested...post your name here if you will participate...Savannah, TJS, Sue, Maria, Martin, Grandma, Cynthia, Cin D, Ronna, Shirley S, Marie B, RGR, Elena, Amrit, Gary, Gary
tjscynthiagwilsonCin_DRonnaelenabilljmavis_swt
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Comments

  • Can I try .... but do not assure the results! :(
    I'm worse than Savannah! :-S
    Maria
  • I'm in. It sounds like a great way to instill a new habit. I often find myself blending without thought.
  • This would be the biggest challenge I think I've ever faced, at least when it comes to painting. I have to say, okay, I'm going to ruin this canvas, waste this paint and I'm going to waste my time. I will consider it a learning exercise and secretly hope the whole time that it somehow works. But I just can't commit to it yet. I can't believe I'm being such a weenie about this but it is a big deal for me to do this.
    cynthiagwilsonmarieb
  • You won't ruin it Sue :) Just do a small painting. Use the slow dry medium. It's only one painting.
  • Mark...thanks for your input...this should be very interesting!! [-O<

    Maria...if I can do it I know you can too....this will be a great learning experience :-&

    Sue...this isn't like you...come on...you can do it...no pressure...just a new project X_X

    TJS...so glad your joining us... :x
  • Ok...I am in. Need to finish a study first though.
    Amrit
  • Does it count if we use a palette knife?
  • Grandma...I think we should stick to brushes on this one...perhaps in the future that would be another great challenge...palette knife only??
  • edited April 2013
    Sue...you are making me hysterical... :)) so glad your doing this!

    I think we will all be pleasantly surprised with our results. It's not about who has the most beautiful painting...its rather a challenge to push ourselves outside of the "box" and challenge our comfort zones......who knows...we may find a new way to paint... 8-|
  • I'm already having a panic attack. Save me from myself. I'm going to take up yoga. I'm going to learn how to grow a vegetable garden. Crochet. Swim. Book a flight to a south seas island. Take vitamins. I'm going to finish my call with the maharishi. Then I'm going to start.
    HarrellcynthiagwilsonmariebMerritt
  • I'm going to learn how to grow a vegetable garden.

    No juicers or smoothies.

    GarycynthiagwilsonKarenmarieb
  • I'm thinking ... I want to make this an enjoyable challange exercise does not a terrible nightmare!
    The choice of the subject is difficult as the challange ... in the end everyone will love you so much Shirley! :-*
    Joke but in fact it will be really interesting for me! :P
    Maria
  • I am with you, studioania, on the difficulty of subject choice. For myself I am thinking of an landscape with segmented colored rock layers- no blending there even in nature. Or just anything that by its nature is divided into layers or strips of color. This seems more like punishment than challenge, but I know that's a poor attitude. It's like those drawing exercises where you had to do it with your left hand if you were right handed.
    marieb
  • No. You already went fishing.
    marieb
  • I've been busy with my new job. I'll do if I have time :)
  • If only Mark would let us know what he thinks about blending. :D
    Garysue_deutschermarieb[Deleted User]
  • More interested in why he doesn't like blending and glazing.
  • Grandma

    Blending destroys the modeling effect gained by the nuances in value.
    In effect a portrait with nine values when blended could be reduced to four or five values. The result is a very plastic looking person. Blending seems also to work in favor of the warmer values at the expense of the essential cooler skin values.

    Depth and dimension is the whole visual illusion that creates powerful paintings.
    The value string is what conveys the illusion of solidity and depth to the viewer.

    As I remember Mark suggests that blending is as minimal as possible except where you are trying to render a smooth (ie ceramic) surface.

    I don't recall Mark saying anything about glazing. It is evident though that he does not use the glazing technique.

    Denis
    tjsCastillo
  • Blending, when done poorly, certainly does not produce a first class painting. Blending when well done is just another tool in a painter's tool box; as is glazing, underpainting, different brush strokes, the use of different types of brushes, and other techniques such as sgraffito, scumbling, imprimatur, tonking, etc. The museums are full of examples of myriad tools/techniques that artists use and use for realistically painted subjects.

    It isn't unusual to find a painting that has blending used in one part and not used in another section. Just as every painting has every part of it glazed, and not every painting has an underpainting, and even those that do use under painting do not always under paint every part of the painting. The ideal is to pick and choose wisely the tool that best suits the artist's need for the job at hand.

    I just wondered WHY Mark is against blending and glazing since he has never said that I heard in his video or read on this forum. I wonder if he is against other tools also? I would expect not, but he is the teacher, but only teaches in the videos and they don't seem to cover this subject. Perhaps this new video on landscapes will cover the use of different brushes and brushstrokes since so many landscape effects can be achieved that way, also sgaffito and tonking. However, I am expecting the video to only cover the effects that apply to the painting he is demonstrating. I am looking forward to seeing that video.
  • Its really blending before you lay in all of your colors on an object, i.e., "fixing," especially when you're starting out on your first couple of paintings, and blending beyond the minimum to soften the transition between two steps (edges).
  • Hi Savannah,
    I'm in. This should be fun. 8-> :-SS ~O) :)
  • Thanks Savannah and Shirley,

    This challenge will be a great learning opportunity! So, I'm going to crush my fear of being a loser L-) and give it a try!

    I'm really excited to start. \:D/
  • Grandma

    Blending, sgraffito and tonking are easy to achieve tricks.

    Mark is showing us how to execute representative realism in a practical and straightforward way.

    The DMP Forum is about the Carder Method. It is not everything you wanted to know about ART. You will have to buy a few books or go back to art school if you want comprehensive tuition in art.

    Gimme a break. What do you expect for $20?

    Denis

    cynthiagwilsonedwardGaryVangie
  • Great explanation, Martin. thank you.
  • edited April 2013
    Grandma said:

    Blending, when done poorly, certainly does not produce a first class painting. Blending when well done is just another tool in a painter's tool box; as is glazing, underpainting, different brush strokes, the use of different types of brushes, and other techniques such as sgraffito, scumbling, imprimatur, tonking, etc. The museums are full of examples of myriad tools/techniques that artists use and use for realistically painted subjects.

    It isn't unusual to find a painting that has blending used in one part and not used in another section. Just as every painting has every part of it glazed, and not every painting has an underpainting, and even those that do use under painting do not always under paint every part of the painting. The ideal is to pick and choose wisely the tool that best suits the artist's need for the job at hand.

    I just wondered WHY Mark is against blending and glazing since he has never said that I heard in his video or read on this forum. I wonder if he is against other tools also? I would expect not, but he is the teacher, but only teaches in the videos and they don't seem to cover this subject. Perhaps this new video on landscapes will cover the use of different brushes and brushstrokes since so many landscape effects can be achieved that way, also sgaffito and tonking. However, I am expecting the video to only cover the effects that apply to the painting he is demonstrating. I am looking forward to seeing that video.

    Hi Grandma,
    I agree with you on the techniques above. But, this forum was created to teach a beginner to intermediate to mostly see, without so many technical sides involved. Once you've done his method in 3-5 stills and learn to see, draw, mix, and paint. Pretty much you venture off into your own thing.

    Truthfully, I don't feel Mark is against any of techniques you've described in your post. You've also stated that as well. I just think Mark won't hit those areas because he wants to keep it simple to this technique.

    But, this is just my view. You can always PM him or David about it.
    Cyn. ~O) ;;)
    tjsGary
  • This is grown out of all proportions to my question about just blending and glazing. Forgive me, Forum, for bringing up the subject.

    I had just expected Mark to express some "why" when he said "Also I may suggest no one worry one bit about their painting looking horrible, but just make damn sure your values and color are right.

    If you blend one stroke, you are defeating the purpose of this challenge in my opinion.

    I would love to see a bunch of horrible paintings where the colors and values are right, even if everything looks all wonky and crooked and "horrible"."

    I added the query about glazing just because I have always wondered about that.
    tjs
  • Grandma...you remind me so much of myself...I'm a "questioner".....I must drive my husband crazy because I constantly want to know "why" about everything...

    When I first watched Mark's original video...he mentions to not over blend...(I think it creates mud)...and we lose the vibrancy of our values and colors...but says to just simply lay your colors down and do as little blending as necessary....

    He also has mentioned several times about a first time student that did an entire painting (his first ever) without blending and I have to tell you....it is a fantastic piece of art work...I wish I could find the painting to post..

    Anyway...you will find that when you lay your colors down...some will automatically blend because you can't help but over lap them...and it will have a "kinda" blended affect...anyway...have fun with it...looking forward to see what you design...so glad your on this forum!
  • tjstjs -
    edited April 2013
    Grandma this is just the way I keep it straight in my head. It might help? :)

    I look at this way. When it come to oil painting there are basically two approaches - indirect method and direct method.

    Indirect - starts with an underpaint followed by layers of heavier paint applications (fat over lean). This can include lots of techniques like glazing, scrumbling and so on. Slowly building up layers and correcting along the way until it looks right.

    Direct (Mark's method) - paint it once and that's it. Learn to get the values and colors right to begin with to eliminate all that layering. That's why it's called Draw, MIx, Paint :) Concentrate on one aspect at a time and get each one correct.

    dencaledwardGaryCin_D
  • dencal said:



    Blending, sgraffito and tonking are easy to achieve tricks.

    Tricks? That's a little, okay... a lot incorrect. Blending, at least, is a technique requiring a bit of practice and skill to use properly. A trick is something like Squinting at your work to open the pupil so the value changes are easier to see. A trick is something anybody can pick up within a minute of trying. So, I'll have to strongly disagree that blending is a trick.

    Now, some people may have an easy time learning to blend properly. But I've taught people who, even after a semester of drawing classes, could not blend pencil to achieve a value change. And I've taught painters who could not blend paint to achieve a convincing form.

    As for sgraffito and tonking: They weren't taught as techniques in school. They were just something picked up from reading about or watching other artists at work. I've seen them used badly, I've seen them used well. A "trick" would imply everybody can use it passibly well because it is so easy.

    Other than that, I have no comment.
    dencalAZPainter
  • dencaldencal -
    edited April 2013
    Karen

    Thank you. Your experience and advice helps us all to grow as artists.

    Denis
  • I may have mis-understood, but I took this challenge as an learning exercise rather than a "technique" for great painting. I recently did a painting using only phthalocyanine blue, burnt umber, and titanium white -- not because those are the best colors to use for a still life, but because using such a constrained palette forced me to make decisions differently and (I guess) and I was supposed to learn something from it (which I'm sure I must have).

    I think taking away a common tool, like blending, forces us to use other tools to compensate, like mixing way more intermediate color on the palette and placing color on the canvass with greater precision in smaller spots. (And I guess also painting into wet paint, which I don't think is the same as "blending" as a technique. My novice definition of painting into wet paint is just applying wet paint into other wet paint in a normal stroke rather than mixing two colors on the canvass, or softening brush strokes.)

    Once the tool is returned, we'll potentially use it differently having had to do without it and make up for it's utility with other tools in this exercise.

    Funnily enough, I have a painting that I think would meed the challenge criteria, not because I took up the challenge, but because it was my first ever attempt at a still life and I honestly didn't know how to blend. :p

    I don't think that would be in the spirit of the challenge though, which I think is to intentionally take away a tool we rely on to force us to find another tool or two to compensate. In my first painting, I just didn't have the tool yet.
    [Deleted User]
  • edited April 2013
    Tjs,
    That painting, and the one Emily Carder did for her first, drew me to this method. I couldn't believe this painting was not blended. Still stands in Gorgeous Category for me.

    Thanks for finding this piece. >:D< :x :)>-
    tjs
  • TJS, I liked what you said about direct and indirect painting. Both have their advantages an neither can be called the right or wrong way to paint. They are simply different styles or techniques of painting.

    Personally I am somewhere in the middle. I make a sketch, sort of a map, if you will, for scale and almost always from a B&W sketch of my composition, but scale taken from the objects being painted. I lay a wash on to tone the canvas and then lay on this "map" I just described. Sometimes I might do a monochromatic wash painting if large and somewhat complex. This is very much, if not in some cases, exactly what Schmid and others do and what makes this work so well is we already have a plan worked out and a clear vision of what we want to achieve and how to do it before wetting a brush. One of several workshops I have taken from Schmid, he said (should "he" be capitalized in his case? :D ), and I think may have mentioned in one of his books, likely "Alla Prima".
    " Ideally, one should be able to look at a scene and see it as a mosiac. If you start in any corner and lay down each color, value, shape, size absolutely accurately what you will have is a perfect reproduction in paint of that scene. " Sounds simple at first and watching him do a demo is pretty close to this. In actuality this is incredibly difficult, if not impossible for 98% of us, but he is correct when you think about it. If everything is exactly correct, the drawing , colors and everything else will be perfect without one bit of blending other than the little that happens when one color overlaps another in a single stroke of the brush. Schmids ability to come so close to this is what makes him so special, like his work or not. His changes in a scene is also his ability to see what is not needed. Often we see many if not most of this paintings what many of us might think as unfinished. Not true. He knows any more added to the painting will take away from what he was trying to accomplish than add to it. He is also a master of "indicating detail with nothing really being done to paint that object. Watching him paint is a real treat most will never forget. He is a little dramatic with some of his flourishes of the brush, but I think this is to keep the audiences attention and be a little more entertaining. I have been fortunate to watch from start to finish a couple of portraits and a couple of landscapes and a still life. All were incredible. I was able to photograph one and would have paid four times retail for a digital movie cam. :D

    BTW, I really like this painting TJS. Well done.
    elena
  • Thanks TJS...this is the painting I was referring too....love this one!
    tjs
  • I likewise was drawn to the method by the two paintings mentioned and a desire to get a more realistic finish to my paintings. Taylors painting is just fantastic and when I read that he had just started painting I looked into Mark's method. I actually first heard of Mark during the riff on wet canvass.
    AZ, I first became a fan of Schmid about 20 years ago. I would love to have been able to go to a workshop of his. I knew I never could and that is how and why I went to one with Cassey Baugh. He was mentoring with Schmid at the time. I appreciate all of the time you put into sharing your knowledge on the forum because it does not produce income for you. I would love to see a couple progress picks of your painting process if you inclined to do so. I am amazed at the speed that you obviously paint with the production you have mentioned. :)
  • I am so glad to see such possitive response to this challenge... I firmly believe this will be the most difficult challenge I have ever attempted... My thought is to do something fairly simple and not too large.
    Remember the goal is to lay the paint on and leave it alone... absolutely NO BLENDING!!
    Good luck everyone!!!
    Cin_Dtjscynthiagwilson
  • You and me both Shirley! I think I will need to print out a sign No Blending :) This is going to be hard for me.

    I already picked out what I'm gonna do. I am excited about it and might have to start before May 1st. I'm going to do a WIP so Mark can see where I'm messing up in the process. I just have a feeling this is going to look like crap. Oh well :((
    cynthiagwilson
  • Have any of you seen Stefan Baumann on PBS? He has a series of videos called The Grand View. You can see trailers of these videos on YouTube. As nearly as I can tell by watching the trailers he does not blend, but a trailer only shows so much. Close up of his canvases show the brush strokes with out blending. If I'm right about his not blending, then he does wonderful landscapes with no blending. Please, if someone has information about him, please share it.
    tjs
  • RGR, Gfish and Karen...does this mean your joining us for the challenge?
  • OK ....here goes ! having a glass of Red, and prob making a decision I will regret,as I haven't painted anything using Mark's method yet ! Great big boot up the backside for me to get me going ! #-o :))
    tjsGary
  • Marieb it's the best place to start - this challenge! I am so glad you will be joining :)
    marieb
  • I am afraid I am a maybe at this point. Have had some health issues since returning from FL and have not been to my studio to paint once. It is amazing how health issues can take over your life and everything else becomes secondary. Hopefully seeing a light on the tunnel at this point
    studioania
  • Certainly hope this is a temporary problem that won't ever reoccur. If you can't make this challenge, the next one seems to be more fun; just get well.
    tjs
  • gfish, hope you get well soon, I know its seems to take more out of you than when younger. i just got over bronchial pneumonia a few weeks ago and i seem to tire so easy.
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