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It's Here - The Very First MJS Painting Challenge

dencaldencal -
edited July 20 in Painting
Folks

interesting challenge just launched by Michael James Smith.

Students can enter. Everyone can vote.



Comments

  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 20
    I find this contest extremely thought-provoking in terms of the type of realism I will/should be doing in the future.  Photorealism?  Impressionism?  Another type of abstraction?  Judging from the DMP gallery selection, we do love our paintings to look excellent close up.  Gotta work on that.  I was just reading about how many of Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings just failed the close-up inspection by one gallerist in particular whose article I just finished reading.  Something to consider if entering this contest.  MJS paints a particular king of realism that looks realistic close up.  I'm realizing more and more how we should probably be very selective about which contests we enter.  Sometimes it takes a little digging to get the information we need to make that decision. 
    dencal
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Correction:  Paid subscribers can enter, everyone can vote.
    dencal
  • Folks

    A couple dozen entries are in already.

    Clearly color value and temperature control are the biggest difficulties.

    https://michaeljamessmith.com/mjs-oil-painting-awards/

    Denis

    PaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    dencal said:
    Folks

    A couple dozen entries are in already.

    Clearly color value and temperature control are the biggest difficulties.

    https://michaeljamessmith.com/mjs-oil-painting-awards/

    Denis

    I'm entering that competition.  I just resumed working on the painting, but it's not finished yet.  Deadline is the 17th.
    dencaltassieguyJuliannaBOB73
  • Heating up the rigger already @PaulB ?
    PaulB
  • SummerSummer -
    edited August 10
    No reason why you can't win this one, @PaulB!
  • boo hiss. it was rigged. @PaulB wasn't in the top ten. Doesn't MJS know Paul is a Brit.
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    That’s right Bob, there were a great many better entries.  The public voting turned into a Facebook popularity contest, although the guy who won that is great, so it kinda worked out.  The MJS choice was highly deserving.

    i diverted my entry to a gallery, so there is still hope for it.
    dencalBOB73
  • There was a particular part of the painting that was ambiguous--the embankment on the left, about half way from the bottom, a narrow opening that lead somewhere, or did it?   I couldn't tell what it was.  The winner actually made it make sense.  imho
  • I'm trying to imagine a VVG painting in this contest.  I just discovered something today that I don't remember anyone ever mentioning about vvg.  I'm sure Vincent used the handle of his brushes to make some of his marks a lot more than I have ever realized.  Probably scraping away to expose the previous layer.  He painted normally, as well.  I have tried copying his marks, and the handle of my brush worked best when I did.  Rambling again, sorry!  Hmm. 
  • I'm not a big fan of the winner. Too harsh and unnatural looking. The trees also look very weird... and lack depth and actual realistic looking shape.
  • dencaldencal -
    edited September 8
    Summer

    According to discussion on vvg techniques at WetCanvas:  thick stiff tube paint was applied directly to the canvas on occasions and both the back of the brush and lengths of bamboo (I imagine in the manner of paint shapers) were used. Lead white seems to be a big part of the technique.

    Stanford has done a formal research paper on vvg brushstrokes. But so limited the stroke types to be analysed to exclude sgrafitto, or scratch and knife marks.

    Denis

    Summer
  • edited September 8
    I like the way Rob (tassieguy) does his trees because there is such a variety of shapes, details and values. But in those (British trees) I'm not a fan of trying to paint every leaf, and would prefer a more abstracted version.
  • I agree, @Richard_P. And unless we're doing a close up like in the tree trunks I painted in Dappled Gums we can make it look as if every leaf has been painted even though they rarely are.  When we take a close look at the trees of great landscape painters like, say, Constable or Shishkin,  we find that for the most part foliage is just suggested. They "maintain the abstraction" as Mark puts it.

     In my last one that's what I tried to do -   except in a few key areas such as the closest brightest leaves where I put in just a few flecks of highlight and in the foreground grass. But even in the close clumps of grass it's mostly just smudges of value with a few more defined strokes to indicate individual blades. :)
    BOB73
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