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Mark's latest landscape painting...

edited July 12 in Painting
Mark posted a new landscape and I feel his results came out rather nicely. Here is a link to the video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaY74lvvcJU&index=2&t=0s&list=LLm4nf9dlxDU3OBsURBiDdmw

Here is a link to another video... Someone on YT questioned Mark's holding of the brush and I just had to reply to his negative comment. If Monet held his brush the same way as Mark does; while painting an Impressionistic painting, then it is good enough for me too! 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJE4QUNgaeg 
manitou

Comments

  • @HwyStar You are right! There are many brush holding grips not just one. Not many people are aware that result is directly linked to the process of painting and in painting and music, there are many processes to achieve different goals. There is no right or wrong if the desired result is achived.

    The gripsI use:
    1. middle of the brush: totally impressionism. I saw this grip in movies 'Lust for Life' and BBC drama-series 'Impressionists'. I use this grip for dabs, scrubbing, stippling.
    2. Holding the brush like a sword: to cover large areas.
    3. End of the Brush grip: regular brush holding grip; all purpose one
    4. Rolling: I use it to achieve abstraction.
    These serve my purpose.
  • dencaldencal -
    edited July 12
    HwyStar

    That is an awesome landscape by Mark.

    The different brush grips/holds along with different brushes, combined with different loading and stroke motion are what we use to create texture, interest, variety, motion, depth and the subtle qualities in light and shadow.

    The hold Mark is using predominantly is all about maintaining the abstraction. This hold means we are using the shoulder to draw and paint not the fingers and wrist.


    Denis

  • Thanks guys. All very informative. All I know is if I wore a white smock like his while painting it would look like leopard spots before long.   Sometimes I hold the brush like a pencil and close to the ferrule for detail work but that is a tiring grip. I watched @Kaustav 's video of him painting and I've tried to emulate some of that. I'd post the link but can't find it. Must have been over a year ago. Thanks again for the video and comments.
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