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A water based primer for aluminium panels

Folks
On Summer’s WIP for the Landscape Challenge thread I began describing my search for a less noxious primer for aluminium composite laminates. While Rustoleum is a fine product for bare metal surfaces is pretty heavy on the VOCs. When I spotted a household primer for metal that is water based it was time for a test.
Yes! I bought a litre of Dulux Precision Maximum Strength Adhesion Primer (DPMSAP).
The shop was reluctant to tint a primer with anything other than a black pigment to arrive at a middish grey. The reasoning was that a brown pigment would only arrive at a light brown. To push it to a mid brown would need so much pigment the primer’s qualities would be compromised. So they shot in 2Y of Black, about 140 mls for the1000 Ml tin.

About to decant into my screwtop jar with built in brush and apply to a brushed aluminium panel.
Photos and description to follow in the morning.
Here is the product, available in Aust. UK and through PPG in US.








The primer surface is a smooth, mat appearance, not unlike a chalk board. Slick to apply and easy to smooth out brush strokes. Best of all NO ODOR AND A WATER CLEAN UP.

This needs a few days to cure. I expect a great drawing surface, unlike an oil toned surface. There should be no sinking as gesso is not needed. 

BTW there are quite a few artists painting directly on bare aluminium. Scott Naismith for one.

I’ll continue the story as it evolves.

Denis
BoudiccaSummer

Comments

  • @dencal ; Denis.  Really helpful information.  I'm so appreciative that you have saved me from having to do this experiment.  I will definitely be using this product.  Please let us know if you think another coat of Dulux is necessary or optional.  Thank you.

    Summer 
    dencal
  • Summer

    Thank you. From all appearances one generous coat seemed to ‘fill the bill’.
    However, a loose brush hair and an untidy edge called for a second, opposite direction coating.
    I subsequently measured the lux rating at eight feet from my light source i.e. where the above photos were taken. Gesso’d panel 1,719 lux. Primed panel 517 lux. I interpret these values as working in adequate light without glare.

    Denis
    alsartSummer
  • There is also a water based white primer for metal here called Bullseye 1-2-3 (you can get it in grey as well). I've tried it and it works very well:

    http://zinsseruk.com/product/bulls-eye-1-2-3/
    Summerdencal
  • RoxyRoxy -
    edited July 8
    Thanks @dencal. I had a small panel prepped with artists acrylic primer. Just as an experiment I started abusing the surface with a palette knife and my fingernail. I was easily able to scrape it all off back to bare metal, which worried me. The only rustoleum I could find was online and outrageously expensive - none of our local paint/automotive stores seem to carry it, so this product sounds promising. Keep us posted.

    [Edit] The panel I used was exactly the same as the one in your photo. I used the brushed side, but scuffed it up even more with some sandpaper to try and give it even more tooth.
    Summerdencal
  • dencaldencal -
    edited July 9
    Roxy

    Getting any brush applied coating to stick to a bare metal surface is a miracle. Have you ever tried to glue metal parts? A palette knife and fingernails is pretty harsh treatment for a paint coating. I doubt the Dulux primer would survive this punishment. I would be happy if over time there was no wrinkling, cracking or delamination under normal painting conditions.

    The next step up in strength of coating products is the epoxy paint and the etching primers, but these are solvent based.

    Two other techniques worth investigating are anodising and powder coating. Extracts from the net >>>>

    Powder coating is an application of pigmented powder that once heat cured becomes a solid and tough coating that adheres to the surface of aluminium. Powder coating can be made in a multitude of colours, lustres, textures & special effects coatings, so they are popular due to the great range of colour options.

    Anodising is an electro-chemical treatment of the aluminium resulting in a hard durable finish that maintains the beauty and natural metallic lustre of aluminium while reinforcing its natural ability to withstand the elements. Anodising is an integral finish, that cannot flake, peel or blister.

    My fall back is the industrially coated aluminium panels used in architectural skins, the flammable version of this product featured in the Grenfell Tower fire. Very durable and in a rainbow of colors.

    Denis


  • Denis, I'm going to apply Geneva foundation stain onto the oil-based Rustoleum tomorrow because obviously I wasn't able to stain the aerosol product I used recently.  Next time I will try the red oxide.  I will probably be applying two coats of Geneva foundation stain over the next few days.  What do you think about the compatibility of this water-based product you are using here with  Geneva foundation stain?  I know it wouldn't work if it were acrylic based.  Seems like I'm having to compromise color of surface I will be painting on.  Too dark, too light, wrong color, wrong value.  Can I use Geneva Foundation Stain on a water-based product?   Hmm.

    Summer
  • Summer

    I understand Geneva Foundation Stain to be a lean pigment mixture. There should be no incompatibility applying GFS over a water based acrylic primer.

    Denis
    Summer
  • GFS over water-based ACRYLIC primer.  The word acrylic scares me but I will give it a try.  Thanks, Denis.
  • You can paint oil paints over an acrylic gesso or primer. It's common practice. :)
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 9
    I've never had to paint oil over acrylic, but I'm recalling now that it's putting acrylic over oil that is a no-no!  Thanks guys. 
  • Summer

    In oil paint and acrylic paint we are relying on a dispersion medium to distribute pigment evenly over the surface and to bind the particles together when they dry. The residual product is a durable polymer skin of pigment.

    In essence the water is long gone when we apply a drying oil / pigment mixture, 

    The no-no you refer to is to guard against putting a rigid acrylic over a, shrinking as it dries, oil paint. Creating cracking and wrinkling.

    Denis

    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited July 9
    This explanation will serve me well in the future.  It's similar to the fat over lean rule in principle.  Thanks, Denis. 
    dencal
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