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Geneva Paints

Artists, 
    I can't wait to put in an order for the Geneva oil paints. I have always used student paints and decided that it was time to upgrade. However, my main objective with buying the Geneva oil paints is not just the high pigment load, but the leveling surface which I often have trouble with... I always end up having too much glare because i use non-leveling paint. Even though I add linseed oil and turp... some how the glare is blinding... I have so much medium and student grade paint by Winsor... does anyone out there know how I can create that same leveling effect with my student grade paints. Also, does the high pigment load really show? I saw many videos online that state it doesn't make much of a difference and instead if you are on a budget you should invest most of your money in a good linen canvas. Thanks!

Mark A 

Comments

  • At the top of the DMP website on the same line as you choose the "Artists' Forum" is "Supply List" click on that and there is a link to a page for paints and mediums for people who can not get Geneva.
     here are the  recipes. there is also a link to a video that shows how to mix the medium with the paint to get the proper consistency for leveling and the other Geneva Characteristics. Note that it calls for venetian turpentine which is hard to find but Mark has said that you can substitute with imitation Venice turpentine.

    recipe for slow-dry medium (for all colors except titanium white):

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits (any artist-grade odorless mineral spirits will do)
    • 5 parts stand oil or linseed stand oil (this is viscous like honey and is not the same as refined linseed oil)
    • 1 part refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *
    • 2 parts oil of cloves

    For burnt umber, you will need extra clove oil. Please watch this video for instructions on how to incorporate the extra clove oil into burnt umber: youtu.be/lpU9egKu-kM

    recipe for slow-dry medium for titanium white:

    • 10 parts odorless mineral spirits
    • 1 part stand oil or linseed stand oil
    • 5 parts refined linseed oil
    • 5 parts Venice turpentine *

    Summerpaultorrescom
  • @Bob73 thank you for your reply. I thought Geneva didn't have any turpentine in it? Do you think the high pigment load really makes a difference to the final product of your painting? I can't wait to try the Geneva limited palette and Im also going to get the stain ground paint and his new glass palette. 
    paultorrescom
  • edited May 31
    @Bob73 thank you for your reply. I thought Geneva didn't have any turpentine in it? Do you think the high pigment load really makes a difference to the final product of your painting? I can't wait to try the Geneva limited palette and Im also going to get the stain ground paint and his new glass palette. 
    I think Venice turpentine is simply tree sap.  My dad raises Horses (still going strong at 68) and we always put that on hooves.  That being said, I don't think the stuff we put on the horses is what I would call 'artist grade' (edit: but for the life of me I don't see that it would matter if it was pure but I found it on Blick https://www.dickblick.com/products/sennelier-venice-turpentine/ .  
    paultorrescom
  • @Markalex777 I think the high pigment load is one of the things that makes Geneva stand out. The colors I have been able to get with Geneva are unparalleled to the Windson Newton Artist Grade I was using before. I also love the flow of Geneva. Just understand though, that geneva paints do produce a pretty glossy surface... in fact when I had my last painting captured professionally for prints, they thought I had already varnished it because it was so shiny. But that said, if you set your studio up as Mark Suggests then the glare won't be an issue as you paint and the final product is a supple gorgeous surface! 
    paultorrescom
  • Yes @Markalex777, as @tyrohne said, the Venice turpentine is larch sap



    paultorrescom
  • The beauty of Geneva isn't just in the finished painting it's in how it performs on your palette and on your brush as you apply it. Also the high pigment load makes them last a long time compared to other brands because of the superior coverage and strong tinting characteristics.  The Venice turpentine is very different from other turps, not nearly as volatile. Otherwise they'd be putting turps on horse hooves and not the expensive "larch tree sap".
    paultorrescom
  • I've been using Mark Carder Geneva oil paints for about a year I have to say that my work has improved a great deal the paints are amazing , colors are the best pigment quality I've used,  paint and brush handling and  paint leveling is  unsurpassed, I can come back the next day, and a few more days, and i can keep on painting, I keep my pallete covered with a plastic container so that it stays wet for about 2 weeks or longer, and I also follow his brush dip method, thanks Mark! 
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