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Painting on white canvas

edited May 17 in Painting
So i havent done this...like ever. But for rhis painting i am going with an all white blank background.  So i decided to try to just paint on an unstained canvas... (hang on...heres the pics then ill post from my computer. Cant type on this phone!)f
PaulBRenoir[Deleted User]KaustavJiashenjudith

Comments

  • okay, so I am finding that I kinda like being able to use that white canvas to my advantage, like for instance in the boots, I mixed a blue black and then wiped out some highlights, same fo his hair and the highlights behind his ear... This has me intrigued... anyone have any experience or reasons as to why this would be a bad idea on other painitngs? 
    p.s. the painting is a little rough right now... but I think I am liking the "abstraction". I put that in quotes because I'm hesitant to even call it that... i've never been quite adept at keeping the abstraction and having good results. 
  • A little rough? oh yeah... like silk pajamas. OK, this is not a water color on paper and I don't know that there are any hard and fast rules. So with no more education on this matter than the man in the moon I  think there is something wrong with the scenario. What IS covering the white blank part of the canvas? Will it stay white? Will the whole canvas be varnished and will canvas impart unwanted qualities to the varnish? I'd want to know more about it before getting in too deep. I hope it's OK and our more learned friends weigh in  and say "not to worry".
    JessicaArtjudith
  • @BOB73 sorry, forgot to mention... the white part of the canvas is painted with Titanium white oil paint. So there won't be any just plain old gesso with no paint on it... the jockeys are being painted on plain unprimed canvas, I went around my drawing with the white paint before I started. 
    I have to wait to paint the background white on the bottom because I am almost empty on my Geneva white, so Im going to avoid that area until my shipment comes and I can paint it white like I did the top. 
    BOB73
  • I'm liking it.  I think it's neat!
    JessicaArtRenoir
  • JessicaArt

    Sorry, not for me. Looks like a jockey cut out, pasted on.

    What is this? I’d say it is a realistic representation of a camera deficiency. Not something I want in a painting, nor would I want to buy such a painting.

    Denis

    JessicaArt
  • Not to worry (about the white background) Denis is right about painting from photos, you have to spot the differences between what the human eye perceives and what the camera records then apply a little judicious artistic license to make it human/natural. Sometime adding detail where the camera doesn't see it and some times leaving out things the camera sees but shouldn't.
    ArtistMartin1
  • Whoa...tell me how you REALLY feel @dencal! Haha well to each his own. I myself like it, like where its going and think it will be a nice final painting. 
    judithArtistMartin1
  • OH Brother, another wishy-washy woman. 
    judithmichalisJessicaArt
  • The white is very dramatic!  Probably will sell well too!
    JessicaArt
  • @JessicaArt this is certainly very well done! I would only request you to blur the all the left edges of the lower head and from lower back to the boots. Use a more muted lighter colors than the object that you painted - May be two values higher but muted. All the upper sections of the right hand sections of the body don't need any touch-up. Frankly I don't care about the body that much but the boots need some blurring.
    JessicaArt
  • Hi @JessicaArt,
    when you say you are painting the jockeys on “plain unprimed canvas” if that is true, there could be a problem. Oil paint will rot unprimed canvas and paint crack and flake off.

    As to the white background- you do you. Expanding and experimenting is what makes art exciting.
    Leo2015JessicaArt
  • I agree with @Boudicca about problems with an unprimed canvas.  That begs the question: Is it possible to prime those unprimed areas once the painting is in progress?  I've never head of such a thing.  Maybe someone else here has.  Hmm.   
  • edited May 21
    I don't think there's anything objectionable about painting on a stark white canvas provided the plan is to cover it all up with paint. So far it looks great. 
    JessicaArt
  • Kaustav said:
    @JessicaArt this is certainly very well done! I would only request you to blur the all the left edges of the lower head and from lower back to the boots. Use a more muted lighter colors than the object that you painted - May be two values higher but muted. All the upper sections of the right hand sections of the body don't need any touch-up. Frankly I don't care about the body that much but the boots need some blurring.
    @Kaustav...could you tell me why to blur the left edges? is it because it is further away than the right?
  • how can there be anything wrong with white background...it is personal style....Mark's ideas about neutral background are about ease of painting...your painting skills are so good
    JessicaArtArtistMartin1
  • edited May 21
    judith said:
    Kaustav said:
    @JessicaArt this is certainly very well done! I would only request you to blur the all the left edges of the lower head and from lower back to the boots. Use a more muted lighter colors than the object that you painted - May be two values higher but muted. All the upper sections of the right hand sections of the body don't need any touch-up. Frankly I don't care about the body that much but the boots need some blurring.
    @Kaustav...could you tell me why to blur the left edges? is it because it is further away than the right?
    It is, but the main reason is that when light directly hits a plain it produces the sharpest edges (sharp edge) and gradually as the surface plane moves away from light, the edges get a reflected light reflected from other adjoining areas (soft edges), depending upon what amount of light adjoining areas are getting. Otherwise, they look like paper cutouts. Soft edges work differently from the main mass of the object. They are slightly lighter but muted.

    This is what I wrote in a post of mine a long time ago
    http://forum.drawmixpaint.com/discussion/6703/study-of-portraits/p1

    This is by Jeremy Lipking. I made an analysts of the edges. Lipking mostly paints the effects of reflected light.
    httpsusv-cdnnet5020129uploadseditor3k2zlui7jvp78njpg





    JessicaArtjudith
  • Thanks everyone!! So, I think my original post was a bit confusing- wishy washy as @BOB73 put it lol (if you were here i'd smack ya. lol) So this canvas is gessoed... normally I stain the canvas in some fashion... either the geneva brown stain, or a more of a burnt sienna type wash... with this painting in particular because of the all white background I intend, I didn't give it a stain..just worked straight on the gesso. My question was meant to target weather or not painting directly on the gesso without a stain was a good idea, but I think it got misinterpreted (because my husband read it the same way a lot of you did- my bad-oops) as to if the white background was a good idea. That I have no question on... I have a "vision" lol just questioning on painting without a stain... @Boudicca yeah, I used the wrong terminology. haha it is gessoed. sorry about that! 
    So to sum it up I REALLY screwed up this post with my rambling and not making sense! haha 
    @Kaustav great advice! Thanks! I will try to fix those things! :)

    PaulBjudith
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    I have painted with a significantly warm-tinted Rustoleum red/brown, and it means that lightest areas sometimes need two coats.  I've painted on white primer and it sometimes means the darkest areas need two coats.

    If you're color matching, it is independent of the stain, and the stain doesn't have any influence, unless you're not getting good coverage.  If instead you're mixing on the canvas, or trying this color and that to see how it looks, then the stain will have a significant influence.

    So I think a neutral mid-range stain is the best choice, but I've learned that my painting will look terrible until the end anyway, and I don't make adjustments based on how it looks, so I no longer care what the stain is - it's all about the texture that I like painting on.
    JessicaArtSummerBOB73
  • good advice @PaulB Im starting my big commission I told you about, so I am thinking it's not a time to break the mold, since the mold has been working in my favor! haha So for this commission Im going to go geneva brown stain, just to be safe. :) 
    SummerBOB73judith
  • You're anything but wishy-washy it was meant as a tongue in cheek complimentary reference because you were standing your ground about what you wanted to paint. 
    JessicaArt
  • ahhh!!! I get it now! I may not be wishy washy but I am slllllow to the joke. LOL Even if you did mean it the way I took it, I took it as a charming knock. Made me snicker in an "oh...bob... " type of way. haha 
    BOB73
  • NO ONE would ever be interested in a painting with a plain white background!


    judithJessicaArt
  • Here is my so far, and it's been put on the back burner until probably July or August (maybe even September if Justify wins the Triple Crown)  as I have two other commitments to start. I can't wait to get back to this though! 
    PaulBBOB73
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