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Paul's Blog

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  • Not sure if this one is going to conquer my fear of ellipses, or round things in general.  I made a few mistakes in the curly asbestos roofing, I'll need to fix those.  I'm worried about the woodgrain in that bird-box, because it's orthogonal to saw cut marks, and looks like fabric.  I might just abstract that.
    Nikolina_marieb
  • Fabulous. The ellipse at the bottom of the watering can doesn't match the top but the cover is domed? and shouldn't matter. The mortar in the bricks immediately to the right of the shadow of the watering can looks too dark but you already saw all that? What about the top of the bird box? Does that get squared off? The roof looks ok but where they overlap is a little too dark. The concave parts of the roofing are a little dark too. The pump is magnificent.
    PaulB
  • The subtle shading on the wall under the overhanging roof is fabulous.
    BOB73PaulB
  • SummerSummer -
    edited June 2
    I'm always at war with values.  And, I never let a single one get away from me if I can help it.  My husband thinks I'm talking to someone as I find them in their hiding places.  I see you have a similar attitude about values and their hiding places. Route them out! 
    BOB73
  • The pump is brilliant!
    PaulB
  • ohhhhh I looooove this...
    PaulB
  • great start @PaulB the bricks look great
    PaulB
  • BOB73 said:
    Fabulous. The ellipse at the bottom of the watering can doesn't match the top but the cover is domed? and shouldn't matter. The mortar in the bricks immediately to the right of the shadow of the watering can looks too dark but you already saw all that? What about the top of the bird box? Does that get squared off? The roof looks ok but where they overlap is a little too dark. The concave parts of the roofing are a little dark too. The pump is magnificent.
    Correct, watering can ellipses don't match in the photo either, and the top is domed.  Well spotted from my poor drawing.



    Agreed also, mortar looks too dark, but...



    The top of the bird box is in shadow, so it doesn't exactly get squared off, but it does this:



    The concave roof is also quite dark, I remember it covered in lichen, but you're right, I have over-darkened it.  Thanks for spotting that.
    BOB73
  • Boudicca said:
    The subtle shading on the wall under the overhanging roof is fabulous.
    Thanks.  It's some kind of stucco wall, pebble-dashed perhaps.  I could have painted it using pointillism, but that sounded like a lot of work.  From a few feet away, this compares well to the photo.

    Summer said:
    I'm always at war with values.  And, I never let a single one get away from me if I can help it.  My husband thinks I'm talking to someone as I find them in their hiding places.  I see you  have a similar attitude about values and their hiding places. Route them out! 
    I am guilty of trying to find other spots on the canvas where I can plop a brushload of the same color.  My reference laminate looks terrible after only minutes.

    Thanks @Richard_P, @judith, @alsart.
  • @paulb Your attention to detail is commendable and the outcome is wonderful. I'm not afraid of ellipses, but they're nothing compared to all the detail, textures, values etc. Splendid, looking forward to the final.
    PaulB
  • Renoir said:
    @paulb Your attention to detail is commendable and the outcome is wonderful. I'm not afraid of ellipses, but they're nothing compared to all the detail, textures, values etc. Splendid, looking forward to the final.
    Thanks @Renoir. I see it a little differently, the details and textures are just brush strokes, and they don't even have to be in the right place.  For example, I appear to have lowered the spout on that pump, but it doesn't matter much.  Details are easy, I just keep fiddling with it, using a small brush, and sooner or later it starts to look complex.  An ellipse, on the other hand, has to be right, or it throws off the whole thing.

    I have a coil of wire to paint on the right hand side that is giving me trouble now.

    Renoirjudith
  • PaulB said:

    I have a coil of wire to paint on the right hand side that is giving me trouble now.

    I'll summon the ellipse muse to guide you.

    PaulB
  • Whaaat?? My god u are crazy! That's so well painted O.O
    PaulBjudithBOB73
  • Right, no need to put the veins on the gnats' wings. On the other hand, you needn't be so subtle with the wood grain on the pump post. It looks great as is though. The brick, mortar and stucco are outstanding (are you a mason too?
    RenoirPaulB
  • amazing work, but look at the size 45 x 45 that is huge,....
  • I don't really know..I guess it's about how much one is keen to spend on the painting.. If that is 61000 how much should be the 5 Terre? 1000000 in my opinion.. 
    BOB73
  • So each work takes 6 - 10 months, and I see Saatchi has 73 works for sale or sold - that's some pace even at 6 months a piece he would have to have started painting at nine years of age,...just pondering the amazing skill he has, and also a nice Little earner ,....thnaks for posting @movealonghome
  • I see the bird!!!
    PaulB
  • PaulB

    I didn’t know you were so skilful with Photoshop.

    Denis

    PaulB
  • Yep definitely a critter. You'll have to hide something else now you have ruined this surprise for us!
    PaulB
  • edited May 24
    Definitely a bird, appears like it's a "barn swallow". This also appears in one your earlier posts, above. Excellent work!
    PaulB
  • Paul, You would have "seen" the bird in the hole even if he wasn't there!
    PaulB
  • BOB73 said:
    Paul, You would have "seen" the bird in the hole even if he wasn't there!
    I might, just like the sheep I can see in the top right corner, which I'm going to try and hide from you.

    This is actually the third photograph my grandfather took, in which I have now found a bird.  I think he liked critters in his pictures.
    ForgivenessBOB73
  • edited May 24
    This scene and everything in this reminds me of one of my own grandfathers who lived in the countryside and, had and maintained wonderful gardens on his property. His shed looked quite similar except wood with stones for foundation, and it was common to find barn swallows there, including their nests, 'cause no birdhouse. These were good to have around because they would help keep the air clear of insects much of the time. I always enjoyed my visits there.
    PaulB


  • One item remains.  I'm quite pleased with this one.

    Renoir
  • Wow! Stunning @PaulB

    The bottom of the watering can appears to have a sharp edge compared to the soft edges of the trough and soil underneath so it appears to be floating a bit. Maybe that edge needs softening a bit?
    PaulB
  • It is floating; supported by the two rails. Wow the texture in this really grabs you, there's no way to escape the 3D effect of it. 
    PaulBRenoir
  • Thanks guys, there is definitely some edge work needed at the bottom of the can.  I've been unable to touch that, because I've made so many attempts to fix the ellipse and the paint is thick and wet there.
  • Another beautiful painting.  How many hours/days did this one take.  Its practically photo real.
    I have a question about liquin.  I never leave it in a brush overnight, even with brush dip.  Have you had difficulty at all with them hardening after some time?  This worry prevents me from using any alkyd at all.  Like Summer, i don't like to clean brushes.  When i do clean them, i use linseed oil soap.  Other store bought soaps have harsh stuff in them or lotions etc which i don't think are good for the brushes.  I just dab with brush dip, wipe, dip once more and leave them.
    PaulBBOB73
  • Another great piece!
    PaulB
  • You really have no idea how good your work is, do you?
    This composition is excellent: balanced, not contrived, there is an equilibrium which brings peace, aside from the pleasant emotions evoked in the subjects painted.
    PaulB
  • Thanks @alsart, @JessicaArt!

    @MikeDerby Thanks, this one took about 25 hours over 12 days.  It was a different approach for me, wherein I completed objects one at a time, rather than my usual haphazard way of finding all the spots that needed the color that was currently on my brush.  This was quicker and more satisfying because the first object completed looked okay and gave me hope.

    Liquin: I use it occasionally, but not every day.  I dislike the smell, but the "detail" variant is a whole lot better, although it still has that "chemistry class" smell.  I never clean my brushes.  But at the end of a session, I do wipe them on paper towels, then one dunk in the brush dip.  I've never had Liquin harden in the brush, but it sure does solidify on my palette in two days.

    I used to clean the brushes in OMS once a week or so, but I stopped because it just doesn't seem to be necessary, and I don't want the fumes, odorless or not.  My last rigger brush survived a year with this treatment, not bad for $5.  Oh, and I just use one brush for all colors, a paper towel being the only way I remove color.  The idea of having four of them in my hand seems silly to me, and if my black isn't black enough, I towel it off, and "clean" it in the fresh black paint.  That's one of Mark's suggestions.

    @Renoir thank you so much.  Believe me, I am aware that this one doesn't suck.

    The composition is just the photo below cropped so it matched the aspect ratio of a piece of Dibond I had sitting around.  This was just outside my grandfather's potting shed, and as a boy I played with that pump, that watering can, and that grey tub on the right, which was filled with water.  A mysterious dark liquid, and when I put my arm in there, I couldn't see my fingers.  I have the same feeling about this scene - peace and good memories.

    My Mother on the other hand, did not.  As a young girl she got dragged along on walks with her father in nearby fields.  He made her carry a burlap sack, and fill it with sheep dung.  When home, the sack was emptied into that tub with the water, as fertilizer for his impressive garden.  No wonder she wasn't happy with me playing in that water. 

    I'm going to frame it and give it to a cousin, who I suspect also played in that water, and now has that pump installed in the garden.


    RenoirdencalSummer
  • OMG! This stupefying. I think it is safe to say that you've conquered the ellipses here. This is a painterly rendering in realism as opposed to a photo realistic painting. Will this go to the gallery too?  
    PaulBRenoir
  • A clear case where the painting is better than the photo! Did you ever decide to add the bird in? Any new news on the gallery? When is the show opening? I just can't wait to hear how you fair! 
    PaulB
  • Thanks @movealonghome, I put the speed of this one down to a more disciplined approach, namely finishing one little section completely before moving on.  I think the "I'll get to that later" approach doesn't work well for me, because the list gets too long, and the painting suffers.  I also like the fact that each section is finished with one layer of paint, so the fat-over-lean principle doesn't apply, and any corrections are made wet-in-wet.

    Thanks @BOB73.  I really struggled with the ellipses, but I think I prevailed.  It's not going to any gallery, I don't have gallery representation, just that one-off exhibition.  Need a portfolio first.

    Thanks @JessicaArt.  I decided to leave out the bird, I think it would make the whole thing too precious and contrived.  Show opened exactly a week ago.  No news or contact.  Formal reception in one week.  When I visited last week, the labels were not all put up, but of the ones that were up, I had the highest price, so that doesn't bode well.  We'll see.
    SummerRenoirBOB73
  • @PaulB sure it bodes well!  You deserve that price and people will understand that. You get what you pay for! One thing I have learned about the art market is that the people who buy this stuff are on a WHOLE other level than us... a couple grand is nothing and they are looking for things to spend their money on! Just hope that they look our way! I couldn't believe the prices they listed my stuff at! Time will tell if it SELLS at those prices... but again... whole other world. Im gonna go clip my coupons and find out whats on sale at the deli this week. LOL that's MY world. haha. 
    PaulBBOB73
  • "Liquin: I use it occasionally, but not every day.  I dislike the smell, but the "detail" variant is a whole lot better, although it still has that "chemistry class" smell.  I never clean my brushes.  But at the end of a session, I do wipe them on paper towels, then one dunk in the brush dip.  I've never had Liquin harden in the brush, but it sure does solidify on my palette in two days."

    Just a little detail that occurred to me while I was reading this passage.  Mark says that we don't have to dip the brush for the first day if we leave the paint on the brush after use and don't wipe it off before putting it away for the night.  I do this regularly and it works fine.  I wipe the brush and dip if it is going to be more than one day though. 

    Since you are using Liquin, occasionally, I can see a need to wipe and dip on that first day--as you are doing.

    Is this the case?  Am I reading this right?  Do I understand what is happening here correctly?  Thanks.

    Summer
    PaulB
  • @Summer, I think that's right.  Brush dip and Geneva paint are all about slowing the drying time, so there's no rush.

    Liquin, on the other hand, needs to be wiped off a brush or it will harden.  Liquin cannot be removed from a painting, unlike varnish, and so I assume that if liquin dries on a brush, game over.
  • We need an experiment: Someone with a lot of brushes (*cough* Summer *cough*) perhaps could let Liquin dry on a brush, then try to revive it.  For science.
    RenoirSummer
  • I'll consider it.
  • People have probably already tried this on WetCanvas
  • SummerSummer -
    edited May 31

    Which Liquin product would you like me to test with--I have the Original, Fine Detail, Oleopasto, Impasto.  I don't have the Light Gel but I'm ordering it now from Amazon.  Need to give that product a try.

    Summer
  • Oh it was only a suggestion, but I would say Liquin Original, with that familiar “what is that stench?” quality we all love.
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