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Paul's Blog

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  • Have you tried washing with soap and water after using the gamsol and seeing how the brush is the next day?
  • No, I have not tried that.  I will, it's more palatable to me than using more solvents.
  • When I use walnut oil I always wash out with soap and water. As long as the paint isn't dry it always comes out with just that.
  • @PaulB

    Just a few words about cleaning brushes.  When you are in Austin, you might look really close at Mark's brush cleaning system.  You may come away with your own ideas about types of brushes and so on, but the cleaning of brushes often was the reason I chose not to paint many many times.  You don't want this to happen to you.  It was the time spent after a painting session cleaning them when I was already tired from painting.  The deterioration that was caused rendering them no longer effective for the technique that I was using them for.  And, the replacement cost which came much too soon.  Yes, I found new uses for the old brushes but after a while cleaning them became annoying and took up too much time.  Mark has come up with the best way of handling the brush problem for serious painters.  I will never go back to the old way.  You are lucky to have this opportunity at the beginning of your career/hobby to see it first hand soon when you take his workshop.  Cleaning brushes is a real drag on the human spirit and I won't do it anymore.  Just saying.  :)

    Summer
  • @Summer, I think I already follow Mark's method on brush cleaning, namely, I don't really clean them.  At the end of every day, the brushes get wiped on a paper towel, then they get brush dip.  That's it.

    This particular problem is trying to get Gamblin varnish out of a brush using Gamblin solvent, and one would think this would work just fine, but it seems to require OMS to do it well.
    Summer
  • SummerSummer -
    edited May 16
    PaulB said:

    This particular problem is trying to get Gamblin varnish out of a brush using Gamblin solvent, and one would think this would work just fine, but it seems to require OMS to do it well.
    In the past, I have always used cheap brushes when varnishing and threw them away afterwards.  I need to varnish again soon, and will do the same.  It will be interesting to see how you solve your problem, though.  Golly, if the manufacturer of the product can't help you with this problem.... 
  • I posted in another thread that Rosemary doesn't recommend gamsol. it has a chemical effect with their ivory brushes. another brand of oms is ok. follow with soap and water. Here it  is again from R&C FAQs:::

    Brushes and Products

    • How do I look after my new natural hair brushes when they arrive?

    • Brush Cleaning for Ivory & Classic Ranges

      After extensive research in our lab, we have found that the brand ‘Gamsol’ or White Spirits are not the best way to clean our Ivory or Classic ranges. There seems to be some sort of chemical within those two particular products that can at times make those ranges ‘splay’ and or ‘curl’ at the end. If you have been using those products with those ranges and not experienced these problems, please continue as you have done in the past. We recommend alternatives which include (but are not limited to):

      Zest It Oil Paint and Dillutant

      Link: https://www.rosemaryandco.com/bits-pieces/zest-it/zest-it-dilutant-cleaner

      Info: It’s an environmentally friendly, non-flammable, non-toxic, biodegradable, alternative to ‘turps’ and white spirit, made from the zest of citrus fruit for cleaning brushes and thinning paint.

      Winsor & Newton Sansodor Low Odour Solvent

      Info: a highly refined odorless mineral spirit that is used to dilute (thin) artists’ oil paints and is also used to dilute oil media (linseed oils, alkyd media, etc).

      Sansodor

      Odorless Turpenoid

      Lavender Brush Cleaner

      Link: http://chelseaclassicalstudiofineartmaterials.com/portfolio/ccs-lavender-brush-cleaner/

      Walnut Oil

      Link: https://www.rosemaryandco.com/bits-pieces/michael-harding

      Alternatively many of the essential oils also make great brush cleaning solvents. Lavender oil is actually a stronger solvent than turpentine. Walnut oil is good for cleaning brushes while painting. Final cleaning however should be done with soap and water.


    judith

  • I like this Liquin.  It has the viscosity of Linseed oil, and a new, equally toxic, but much more pleasant smell.
  • edited May 19
    Isn't that alkyd and way more toxic than linseed oil which isn't toxic at all? Oh I see you're comapring it to another liquin nevermind
    PaulB


  • Not sure if this one is going to conquer my fear of ellipses, or round things in general.  I made a few mistakes in the curly asbestos roofing, I'll need to fix those.  I'm worried about the woodgrain in that bird-box, because it's orthogonal to saw cut marks, and looks like fabric.  I might just abstract that.
    Nikolina_
  • Fabulous. The ellipse at the bottom of the watering can doesn't match the top but the cover is domed? and shouldn't matter. The mortar in the bricks immediately to the right of the shadow of the watering can looks too dark but you already saw all that? What about the top of the bird box? Does that get squared off? The roof looks ok but where they overlap is a little too dark. The concave parts of the roofing are a little dark too. The pump is magnificent.
    PaulB
  • The subtle shading on the wall under the overhanging roof is fabulous.
    BOB73PaulB
  • I'm always at war with values.  And, I never let a single one get away from me if I can help it.  My husband thinks I'm talking to someone as I find them in their hiding places.  I see you  have a similar attitude about values and their hiding places. Route them out! 
    BOB73
  • The pump is brilliant!
    PaulB
  • ohhhhh I looooove this...
    PaulB
  • great start @PaulB the bricks look great
    PaulB
  • BOB73 said:
    Fabulous. The ellipse at the bottom of the watering can doesn't match the top but the cover is domed? and shouldn't matter. The mortar in the bricks immediately to the right of the shadow of the watering can looks too dark but you already saw all that? What about the top of the bird box? Does that get squared off? The roof looks ok but where they overlap is a little too dark. The concave parts of the roofing are a little dark too. The pump is magnificent.
    Correct, watering can ellipses don't match in the photo either, and the top is domed.  Well spotted from my poor drawing.



    Agreed also, mortar looks too dark, but...



    The top of the bird box is in shadow, so it doesn't exactly get squared off, but it does this:



    The concave roof is also quite dark, I remember it covered in lichen, but you're right, I have over-darkened it.  Thanks for spotting that.
    BOB73
  • Boudicca said:
    The subtle shading on the wall under the overhanging roof is fabulous.
    Thanks.  It's some kind of stucco wall, pebble-dashed perhaps.  I could have painted it using pointillism, but that sounded like a lot of work.  From a few feet away, this compares well to the photo.

    Summer said:
    I'm always at war with values.  And, I never let a single one get away from me if I can help it.  My husband thinks I'm talking to someone as I find them in their hiding places.  I see you  have a similar attitude about values and their hiding places. Route them out! 
    I am guilty of trying to find other spots on the canvas where I can plop a brushload of the same color.  My reference laminate looks terrible after only minutes.

    Thanks @Richard_P, @judith, @alsart.
  • @paulb Your attention to detail is commendable and the outcome is wonderful. I'm not afraid of ellipses, but they're nothing compared to all the detail, textures, values etc. Splendid, looking forward to the final.
    PaulB
  • Renoir said:
    @paulb Your attention to detail is commendable and the outcome is wonderful. I'm not afraid of ellipses, but they're nothing compared to all the detail, textures, values etc. Splendid, looking forward to the final.
    Thanks @Renoir. I see it a little differently, the details and textures are just brush strokes, and they don't even have to be in the right place.  For example, I appear to have lowered the spout on that pump, but it doesn't matter much.  Details are easy, I just keep fiddling with it, using a small brush, and sooner or later it starts to look complex.  An ellipse, on the other hand, has to be right, or it throws off the whole thing.

    I have a coil of wire to paint on the right hand side that is giving me trouble now.

    Renoirjudith
  • PaulB said:

    I have a coil of wire to paint on the right hand side that is giving me trouble now.

    I'll summon the ellipse muse to guide you.

    PaulB
  • Whaaat?? My god u are crazy! That's so well painted O.O
    PaulBjudithBOB73
  • Right, no need to put the veins on the gnats' wings. On the other hand, you needn't be so subtle with the wood grain on the pump post. It looks great as is though. The brick, mortar and stucco are outstanding (are you a mason too?
    RenoirPaulB
  • amazing work, but look at the size 45 x 45 that is huge,....
  • I don't really know..I guess it's about how much one is keen to spend on the painting.. If that is 61000 how much should be the 5 Terre? 1000000 in my opinion.. 
    BOB73
  • edited May 23
    Maybe this will inspire Paul to quit his day job

    @alsart yeah the crazy hyperrealist ones are usually big
  • So each work takes 6 - 10 months, and I see Saatchi has 73 works for sale or sold - that's some pace even at 6 months a piece he would have to have started painting at nine years of age,...just pondering the amazing skill he has, and also a nice Little earner ,....thnaks for posting @movealonghome
  • I see the bird!!!
    PaulB
  • PaulB

    I didn’t know you were so skilful with Photoshop.

    Denis

    PaulB
  • Yep definitely a critter. You'll have to hide something else now you have ruined this surprise for us!
    PaulB
  • edited May 24
    Definitely a bird, appears like it's a "barn swallow". This also appears in one your earlier posts, above. Excellent work!
    PaulB
  • Paul, You would have "seen" the bird in the hole even if he wasn't there!
    PaulB
  • BOB73 said:
    Paul, You would have "seen" the bird in the hole even if he wasn't there!
    I might, just like the sheep I can see in the top right corner, which I'm going to try and hide from you.

    This is actually the third photograph my grandfather took, in which I have now found a bird.  I think he liked critters in his pictures.
    ForgivenessBOB73
  • edited May 24
    This scene and everything in this reminds me of one of my own grandfathers who lived in the countryside and, had and maintained wonderful gardens on his property. His shed looked quite similar except wood with stones for foundation, and it was common to find barn swallows there, including their nests, 'cause no birdhouse. These were good to have around because they would help keep the air clear of insects much of the time. I always enjoyed my visits there.
    PaulB
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