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Paul's Blog

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  • Neutrals? Looks like a cold blue/violet here..
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Michael Harding Neutral Gray N2,4,6,8.  I think it's neutral in the sense that it's black/white, not carder chromatic neutral.
    Forgiveness
  • Are they Williamsburg?  I love the Neutrals - someone here turned me onto Paul Foxton and that is when I started experimenting with these beautiful true neutrals - some people think of it as a religion - I was trying to mix my own neutrals like Paul F does on his palette but then found that a Munsell group of artists convinced Williamsburg to do it for them which I think is genius for someone lazy like me.  :)  I'm addicted to my neutrals now - It helps me instantly get the value range for the painting.  there are beautiful notes of other colors added (burnt sienna, umber etc...)
    https://www.justpaint.org/williamsburgs-special-edition-neutral-grays/

    a small quote from above article:

    "But the project quickly grew as the request made its way to Rational Painting ( http://rationalpainting.org), a well-regarded forum dedicated, among other things, to a Munsell-based approach to color. Could they order as a group? How precisely could we match the colors? Could the spectrophotometer be set to Illuminant C with a 2 degree observer, the standard that was used when defining the original Munsell swatches? Could they use Mars Black? Or perhaps Lamp? Ship to the UK, Germany, Australia? Who should sign off on the samples before going forward? And so it went, the questions at once helping to define the project while also expanding its reach. In the end the group settled on four Munsell values (N2, N4, N6, N8) ground in alkali-refined linseed oil and using a combination of Titanium White, Lamp Black, and small touches of various iron oxides (Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna, Raw Sienna) to pull the otherwise too-cool mixtures back towards neutral. It was a balancing act that required great finesse on the part of the Lab, with the goal to always track as tightly as possible the spectral curves generated from an official, newly minted set of Munsell Grays.

     

    Williamsburg Neutral Grays

    As one can see below, the matches between the Munsell and Williamsburg Grays are nearly flawless as they stretch out across the spectrum, the slightest undulations animating the otherwise flat uneventful lines. The fact that any attempt at Munsell equivalents are constantly compared to such an exacting, universal model is one of the things that sets these colors apart. There is absolutely no wiggle room or poetic license here. Rather, the Munsell Grays are meant to form an objective and known scale that any other color can be measured against. Incorporated as a part of one’s palette, or system of mixing, they can allow a painter to adjust a color’s chroma in a repeatable and precise way that is simply not attainable otherwise."


    I ended up getting down a rabbit hole of Munsell books and experimental paintings and charts - even clipping out chips onto my color checker to get the exact value and color mixture...…  

    Not surprisingly, it didn't suit my crazy personality so I bought the Williamsburg N s and in a matter of 2 minutes I have N2 - N9 at the top of my palette for reference (copying PaulF)….   PaulB  - I think you were the one who turned me onto PaulF?  


    Anyway, I need to be diligent like this PaulB and really see where these can take me.  Lately, I'm using N8 plus or minus as my go- to lights like on white tablecloths etc...  I feel like I am cheating.



    PaulBRenoir
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Williamsburg, yes, I misspoke earlier.
  • PaulB said:
    Williamsburg, yes, I misspoke earlier.
    I like correcting people.  :)

    For all I knew, Michael Harding came out with it too!!!  They would make a fortune!  Williamsburg has cornered that market.
  • @Julianna and neutrals? sounds like an oxymoron unless fuchsia and cad-orange are neutrals.
    Julianna
  • @BOB73 ; shhhh    that's my secret to my obnoxious colors being obnoxious  :)  @PaulB has naturally beautiful and subtle colors so I imagine that his neutrals are just making those more beautiful and luscious.  
    These true neutrals are amazing to me.  
    Renoir
  • You better not have let any chickens near your beautiful painting!
    PaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Richard_P said:
    You better not have let any chickens near your beautiful painting!
    No, no.  The rats keep them away.
    Bancroft414
  • You're cat asleep on the job?  Juried sink terror into a new show that is really grand. It absolutely fits the theme of visual feast. Any good prizes to win? Since we have dozens of new members it would be nice of you to re-post a photo of it.
    Bancroft414
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    BOB73 said:
    Since we have dozens of new members it would be nice of you to re-post a photo of it.
    That wastes CDN resources.  Just add a comment to the old thread to bring it to the top.
  • Can you add a varnish over the easel?
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Richard_P said:
    Can you add a varnish over the easel?
    Perhaps, yes.  An easier solution is to not care about damaging the finish.
  • Hmm.. Aren't you a perfectionist? :)
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Richard_P said:
    Hmm.. Aren't you a perfectionist? :)
    Not even close.  Perfectionist is a synonym for unhappy.
  • This Strada easel looks nice!

    Let's hope it doesn't close on your fingers.. :)
    PaulB
  • I think there's nothing to worry about as I'm sure Sraddle was talking about pure clove oil especially as used for cleaning. the miniscule amounts in Geneva and brush dip probably won't tear it up too bad unless Murphy get's too close.
  • I can't think of anything that would make those stradda easels worth their cost. They aren't waterproof, light-weight or adaptable without extra accessories. There are lots of better alternatives out there at 1/4 of the cost. 
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    BOB73 said:
    There are lots of better alternatives out there at 1/4 of the cost. 
    The Strada Mid is $280.  I doubt a $70 setup would cut it, all I found were ones that people rated as junk.  I took advice from someone who knows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUCxhkKnqZU

    BOB73 said:
    I can't think of anything that would make those stradda easels worth their cost.
    High quality and durability, highly rated, good customer service, made in the US.  What more could you want, tolerance for clove oil?  :)

    Julianna
  • I don't doubt the tough construction and quality. I just think for what it could cost to make them, they should sell for less. I like those boxes on the large size. SoHo makes a nice one that holds everything you need except the tripod including brush holders, extra space for panels and a paper towel roll holder. It would be easy to replace the wood pallet with a glass one. But you're right, if Murphy is around, my choice could end up in splinters or just fall apart spontaneously.
  • PaulB

    Next step is to draw a few squiggles with the brush to place things.

    Denis

    PaulBRenoirBancroft414
  • edited April 12
    is there any way to connect that left light notan value with  the rest of the notan light value on the right?  Even if just a sliver?   Those two buds are just begging to be the connection  (8 o'clock position if it was a dial) - connecting the lights and darks in some way is what I am learning is so important.  Not that I know anything.  :)   P.S. that was funny about your wild rabbit.  You do know you will have to paint a wild rabbit in all of it's glory soon.  :)

    the darks are already connected easily - just imagine walking along that light notan side and needing a path - there is just one little gap to connect the light notan.

    *(if you believe in the power of notans) :)

    PaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    dencal said:
    Next step is to draw a few squiggles with the brush to place things.
    Absolutely!  I've done two paintings that way now, the first one was a bit off, but you'd never know if I didn't show the setup.

    The painting above needed ome accuracy I felt, because I want things to align just so.
    dencalRenoir
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Julianna said:
    is there any way to connect that left light notan value with  the rest of the notan light value on the right?  Even if just a sliver?   Those two buds are just begging to be the connection  (8 o'clock position if it was a dial) - connecting the lights and darks in some way is what I am learning is so important.  Not that I know anything.  :)   P.S. that was funny about your wild rabbit.  You do know you will have to paint a wild rabbit in all of it's glory soon.  :)

    the darks are already connected easily - just imagine walking along that light notan side and needing a path - there is just one little gap to connect the light notan.

    *(if you believe in the power of notans) :)

    The right side is not really light, it's just not black.  It's a deep red/brown.  The rabbit ears and carrots are orchid leaves and a saturated dark green.  In other words, this isn't the full notan.  I'll post it when it's finished, which should be tonight.

    I do agree that notan shapes are important parts of the composition.
  • dencal said:
    PaulB

    Next step is to draw a few squiggles with the brush to place things.

    Denis

    That's when you jump over a great chasm of self-doubt, clinging yet to a flatland way of thinking. For some reason, this made me think of, well, how we think, and how we need to challenge our perspectives. It's a leap of faith into a completely different dimension.

    A notable quote: “True,” said the Sphere; “it appears to you a Plane, because you are not accustomed to light and shade and perspective; just as in Flatland a Hexagon would appear a Straight Line to one who has not the Art of Sight Recognition. But in reality it is a Solid, as you shall learn by the sense of Feeling.”  
    ― Edwin A. Abbott, Flatland
    PaulBBOB73Bancroft414
  • Renoir

    I think Obi-Wan Kenobi said it better in 1977 “ Use the Force Luke”.

    Denis

    PaulBRenoirBancroft414
  • Legs? Hell, look at those teeth. He's probably wearing wolf's skin gloves. 
  • Very good news - been wondering about that thing for a while - I knew it would sell 
    any news you care to share on the new home (general terms) 



    JuliannaPaulB
  • I can't believe it lasted this long!   Congratulations.  It is a beautiful painting.
    PaulBRenoir
  • Congratulations!!!!!!!
    PaulB
  • edited April 30
    Fantastic news, Paul.  It was so good I'd have been very surprised if it hadn't sold.  :)
    PaulB
  • Congratulations!!

    Hope you got a good price for it! :)
    PaulBedavison
  • Congratulations! I hope you got more out of it than what you put into it, after all your hard work.
    PaulBBancroft414
  • PaulBPaulB mod

    Panel Prep

    I've hit upon the right combination of roller pressure (very little), coat count (1), and amount of Rustoleum (minimal) to achieve the right texture (for me) on my favorite substrate (6mm CompBond panel), and I'm very happy with the results.  No more blemishes, lumps and ridges.



    Gamvar Beading

    Now I have Gamvar beading. I knew something was amiss as I was brushing on Gamvar Gloss, and it was like putting water on a freshly waxed car.  It would not stick, and kept pooling.  It's odd to have a varnish that won't stick to the painting.

    Following Gamblin's recommendations, I added a little Gamsol and scrubbed the painting with the varnish brush.  It did not completely solve it, but reduced it to unnoticeable.  This morning I touched the bald spots (on the painting) with a little more Gamvar and it seems to have solved it.

    Not happy with this. I'm wondering why this is the first time I see it, having varnished about 85 other paintings. This was easily the coldest day I varnished (50F, 10C), could it be that?
    dencalMichaelDSummer
  • PaulB

    Yep. Ten is too cool for good varnishing, solvents slow to dry, resins thicken and make it difficult to evenly disperse.

    Panel looks perfect.

    Denis

    RenoirPaulBSummerBOB73
  • Delighted to hear some lucky family will enjoy your Cinque Terre! It really was an amazing experience that you shared with us, we are the lucky ones  <3
    PaulB
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    Thanks @dencal, I'm going to keep track of the temperature for varnishing, to see where I get good coating.

    Thanks @Renoir, it was nice to see it go to someone appreciative, elevating it from educational project to actual product.  Glad I made prints though.
    RenoirBOB73
  • Thanks for sharing your Gamvar experience, Paul.  I have found that humidity is also a factor to consider when varnishing.  It can cause cloudiness.  Summer 
  • @PaulB
    I too am a previous sufferer of GBT (Gamvar Beading Trauma)

    I feel your pain

  • What are the differences you find between the 6mm and the 3mm?

    My favourite aspect of the aluminum panels is having a bunch prepped and being able to cut it down in just a couple minutes and start drawing and painting on it right away. It's really amazing after being used to stretching individual canvases at specific sizes and priming them which took a couple days
  • PaulBPaulB mod
    The difference between the 3mm and 6mm is enormous. It feels more than twice as heavy, but has a solidity to it that I really like. A little mass helps keep things stable on the easel. What I like most is that it has the feel of a higher quality product.  It does mandate a circular saw to cut though, no score and snap with the big stuff.  The cost is surprising, I paid:

    3mm DiBond, double-sided, 48" x 96", US$174.09
    6mm CompBond, double-sided, 48" x 96", US$127.45

    So the thicker panel is cheaper, no idea why.  Yes, they mix imperial and metric units.

    @Summer, you have experience with this thickness also, how are you liking it?

    I agree, I like having ACM panels ready to paint on. I have 29 of them right now, in various sizes, generally trending larger. I have 12" x 9", 12" x 12", 12" x 16" and now 12" x 18". The latter being a convenient size to cut from my stock, without waste. I have been advised to go bigger by several people who know better than I.
  • SummerSummer -
    edited May 16
    PaulB,

    I have many brands of aluminum panels in odd sizes and thicknesses to use up.  I'm working on six of these smaller and thinner panels now.  But I'm planning a long-term project which will use up my stash of 6mm aluminum panels in 3 sizes: 22" x 24", 24" x 24", and 22" x 28".  These do not need to be braced with aluminum channels like we did with some of the thinner panels.  But, I found that they do need some sort of attachment device to the floating frames we're building.  With the thinner panels, threaded inserts were attached to the channel braces we glued to the backs of the panels.   With the thicker panels, 6mm, the inserts are threaded directly into the plastic that is in between the aluminum sheets.  A lot less work.  The panels attach perfectly to the frames when we are done.

    I'm planning to paint a series of autumn canyon trail views with 6-8 of the largest aluminum panels over the next 16 months.  I will have WhiteWall make up each reference photo.  I grid the photo with LibreOffice Draw and Affinity before I upload it to WhiteWall and they laminate and print.  I was happy with the last photo they did for me in this way.  Though they were curious about the grid in between the photo and the lamination.  What was I doing to ruin a perfectly good photo.  HA-HA 

    I guess this means that I am a fan of aluminum substrates--in all sizes and thicknesses. 

    Summer

       
    PaulB
  • Interesting.. I haven't found 6mm thickness ACM panels here, but I can get the 3mm ones cheaper at A3 and A4 sized :)
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